Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    shifters, derailers, etc.

    I wish I understood this stuff better. Can someone refer me to some links or threads where I can become better familiar with gears set ups? (and terminology)

    I'm looking at 3 tri-bikes.

    Cervelo P2 SL Ultegra Complete Bike - 2008

    Cervelo P2 SL - 2008

    Shimano Dura-Ace, 20 Speed Triathlon Bike
    2009 Motobecane Nemesis PRO


    I guess I'm just asking for feedback on how these individual gear systems will benefit me as a rider. From what I understand the Nemesis has the best set up. But is it overkill? As a beginner triathlete, will I reap the full benefits of the upgrade?

    Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. And if I'm in the wrong forum, please advise. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Rahzel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    My Bikes
    Trek 1500 road bike, Giant Trinity Alliance tri bike
    Posts
    310
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The componentry on tri bikes is perhaps the least important consideration when buying your bike. Consider many things before worrying about 105 vs. Ultegra vs. Dura-Ace, including (more or less in order):

    - Fit
    - Price
    - Frame aerodynamics
    - Wheel spec
    - Cockpit spec

    Additionally, read the sticky concerning "which bike should I get?" Though it won't necessarily directly answer your question, it will give you some guidance about how you should be approaching your tri bike purchase.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rahzel View Post
    The componentry on tri bikes is perhaps the least important consideration when buying your bike. Consider many things before worrying about 105 vs. Ultegra vs. Dura-Ace, including (more or less in order):

    - Fit
    - Price
    - Frame aerodynamics
    - Wheel spec
    - Cockpit spec

    Additionally, read the sticky concerning "which bike should I get?" Though it won't necessarily directly answer your question, it will give you some guidance about how you should be approaching your tri bike purchase.
    Thanks, I will read that.

    The thing is, with the Nemesis the price (2nd on the list) is great. While the frame may not be as good as the Cervelo, all the frames are good from everything I've read. It's aluminum but they all are. The wheels on the Nemesis is Ritchey PRO set up, which I've heard good things about. I'd just like to know what the advantage of a Dura-Ace set up is. Is this something I'm going to want in the future?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Rahzel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    My Bikes
    Trek 1500 road bike, Giant Trinity Alliance tri bike
    Posts
    310
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "all the frames are good from everything I've read. It's aluminum but they all are."

    This is not true. Some frames are more aerodynamic (Cervelo) and others are not (Motobecane). Additionally, they have different geometries, and I'm positive that one of the two bikes will have a better geometry for you.

    I suggest you re-read my sticky post, and re-read the web pages for the bikes you're interested in. My sticky helps elucidate that geometry is very important, perhaps moreso than frame material, and the bike pages will tell you the specific geometry of each of the frames, and which one is right for you.

    The advantage of a Dura-Ace setup is, as I've said before, very minimal. In a triathlon, aerodynamics is pretty much your highest priority, and going from 105 or Ultegra to Dura-Ace is pretty much an aerodynamic wash. Save your money and buy something else, like the frame that fits you, an aero helmet, and aero wheels.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rahzel View Post
    "all the frames are good from everything I've read. It's aluminum but they all are."

    This is not true. Some frames are more aerodynamic (Cervelo) and others are not (Motobecane).
    Do you have actual data about wind tunnel results for this frame? How much time loss are we talking between a P2 and Nemesis frame?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rahzel View Post
    The advantage of a Dura-Ace setup is, as I've said before, very minimal. In a triathlon, aerodynamics is pretty much your highest priority, and going from 105 or Ultegra to Dura-Ace is pretty much an aerodynamic wash. Save your money and buy something else, like the frame that fits you, an aero helmet, and aero wheels.
    Well that's the thing. With the Nemesis I can get the dura-ace and pay less. And it seems the wheel set up is better also. Just seems I'm giving up an awful lot for a more aero frame.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Rahzel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    My Bikes
    Trek 1500 road bike, Giant Trinity Alliance tri bike
    Posts
    310
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Calminian View Post
    Do you have actual data about wind tunnel results for this frame? How much time loss are we talking between a P2 and Nemesis frame?
    Check out the Cervelo knowledge base from the Cervelo website for specifics regarding the aerodynamics of their frames. To my knowledge, the Motobecane frames have not been wind tunnel tested.

    Well that's the thing. With the Nemesis I can get the dura-ace and pay less. And it seems the wheel set up is better also. Just seems I'm giving up an awful lot for a more aero frame.
    Once again: upgrading the components gets you basically ZERO time savings. Upgrading the frame to something that is not only more aero, but will put you in a more powerful and aerodynamic position will get you lots of time savings. Unless the Motobecane is significantly cheaper than the Cervelo, I still recommend the Cervelo.

    You seem to be pretty dead-set on getting Dura-Ace. That's fine, but just know that the money you spend on Dura-Ace could be much better spent on an aero helmet and race wheels (or a frame that will save you more time than the components will).

    Note: the wheel setups are actually pretty similar. In triathlon, wheels don't really make much of a difference until you get into the 40-50mm rim depth arena. Since both bikes come with training wheels, don't base your purchase on wheel specs.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rahzel View Post
    Once again: upgrading the components gets you basically ZERO time savings. Upgrading the frame to something that is not only more aero, but will put you in a more powerful and aerodynamic position will get you lots of time savings. Unless the Motobecane is significantly cheaper than the Cervelo, I still recommend the Cervelo.
    The Nemesis is $1300 delivered. The P2 SL is $1650 delivered. That's the least expensive option I have with the Cervelo. Motobecane doesn't have anything with a 78 degree seat angle and if that's the position I'm going to be more comfortable in, it's a big consideration.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rahzel View Post
    You seem to be pretty dead-set on getting Dura-Ace. That's fine, but just know that the money you spend on Dura-Ace could be much better spent on an aero helmet and race wheels (or a frame that will save you more time than the components will).
    No no, don't get me wrong. I'm taking in everything you're telling me and very much appreciate it.

    In fact, now I'm looking at the Nemesis 2008. I can get it for $1000 delivered (no Dura-Ace, no Richy wheels). Maybe that would be the best option.

    That's $650 less than the Cervelo option. The only issue I'm concerned about is my riding angle. If I'm more comfortable at 78 degrees it's all moot. I'm not close to any decisions yet.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts
    My Bikes
    Trek 1400, Raleigh 20
    Posts
    165
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Clearly the factors that go into making a bike buying decision are manyfold--less so when you have the use narrowed down as you do, Calminian. But maybe test riding a few different setups will give you a sense of what the differences are. I don't know how accessible test riding some of the more expensive rigs is, but I'd imagine you could get on some good bikes if there's a tri outfit near you. Then, you'd have experienced backup right there.

    Especially as a beginner, perhaps doing a couple of races with any bike will set a context for you to better learn about what bikes/setups will work better as you go. I'd think it's the best way to figure out why the info in the sticky is actually in the sticky.

    I may have missed it, but what races are you anticipating doing?

    When you do get a bike definitely throw some pictures up here!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Jagee View Post
    I may have missed it, but what races are you anticipating doing?
    There's a few I'm looking at, but there's an olympic distance out of L.A. (venice beach) in September I'd really like to do. I've been training on the stationary bikes at my gym and a super swim in my pool. Obviously, I need to get a bike quick for that one.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •