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  1. #1
    Dirt-riding heretic DrPete's Avatar
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    Zipp Hand-wringing: 808 clydes or 1080's?

    So I'm planning on renting a couple pairs of Zipps this summer for a planned purchase in the fall... Finishing residency and getting my first real paycheck has its perks. I'm looking to buy a pair of non-disc wheels so I'm covered for the no-disc events, and then adding a Sub9 or 900 disc later on.

    I'm a pretty big dude, weighing in at 215 right now but hoping to hit 200 by season's end. I'm reasonably fast on the bike but not a beast. The two wheelsets I'm looking at are the Zipp 808 Clydesdale tubular and the 1080 tubular. As for recommended rider weight, Zipp says the 1080's are good up to 225 and the 808 Clydes are to 275. They also say that above 190lbs to "consider the 404 or 808 Clydesdale."

    I guess there's really no way I'm going to answer this question without riding both sets, but demo-ing 808's and 1080's isn't exactly easy or cheap. As for behavior in crosswinds I think it's kind of a wash--I'm big enough that I could probably run a front disc and be ok.

    What I can't seem to answer is the difference in lateral stiffness between an 808 clyde and a 1080. Anyone have any experience with these two wheels and care to comment?
    "Unless he was racing there was no way he could match my speed."

  2. #2
    Toughen the pluck up! wannaride's Avatar
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    Last year I got a bike with a set of Zedtech 4's and was told that I need not worry about going Clyde unless I was 225 or over. I looked at 808's and 1080's this year for my tri bike. Ideally I would have gone with a combination. However the experience of those with 808's has been very positive while there have been some issues with the 1080's. I've had my 808's now for three races and I train on them too and have been very happy with them.

    Keep the rubber side down!

  3. #3
    Dirt-riding heretic DrPete's Avatar
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    What "issues" have there been with 1080s?

    Also, the weight thing is interesting. Zipp's party line is this:

    Quote Originally Posted by zipp.com
    We generally recommend our maximum limit at 275 lbs. That is not to say that every Zipp wheel is right (or wrong) for you. We strongly believe in having the right wheel for the right application. The needs of a 220 lb sprinter are different from those of a 115 lb triathlete. If you are at or above 190 lbs, we strongly recommend you consider the Clydesdale 404 or 808. These wheels have additional spokes that offer better stiffness and cornering confidence for someone at that weight. Keep in mind - this is a guideline. There are very strong riders at 180 lbs who may prefer the Clydesdale, and very smooth-riding 225 lb riders who may prefer the standard wheel.

    Recommended maximum weight for specific wheels:
    190 lbs (86kg) for 202 and 303 tubular
    225 lbs (102kg) for Team Issue, 404, 808, and 1080
    Above 190 lbs (86kg), consider Clydesdale 404 and 808
    275 lbs (125kg): Cyclocross, Clydesdale, Track, Disc wheels
    So really, I'm in the "Consider Clydesdale" range, and I'm wondering if I should. Having come from a background of almost 100% crit racing, I love a super-stiff wheel. I guess it'll all hinge on the race I do on 1080's. We'll see how they fare.

    As a totally separate question, why would you train on 808's?
    "Unless he was racing there was no way he could match my speed."

  4. #4
    Senior Member thedutchtouch's Avatar
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    i don't know enough about the wheels to weigh in... but wouldn't buying the 1080's be a good incentive to keep fit/ get more fit? a " i have to stay in shape so i can use my wheels" goal?

    also, i'd say if they're advertised as goof for up to 225, and you're 215 or lower, they should be fine, usually manufacturers give themselved a wondow of comfort for warranty purposes- otherwise they'd be warrantying wheels every tine a 226 rider jumped on.


    another thing to consider- is that rider weight? or total weight? you may have to add in the weight of your bike? brings the total package up slightly.

  5. #5
    Dirt-riding heretic DrPete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedutchtouch View Post
    i don't know enough about the wheels to weigh in... but wouldn't buying the 1080's be a good incentive to keep fit/ get more fit? a " i have to stay in shape so i can use my wheels" goal?

    also, i'd say if they're advertised as goof for up to 225, and you're 215 or lower, they should be fine, usually manufacturers give themselved a wondow of comfort for warranty purposes- otherwise they'd be warrantying wheels every tine a 226 rider jumped on.


    another thing to consider- is that rider weight? or total weight? you may have to add in the weight of your bike? brings the total package up slightly.
    It's rider weight.

    The problem is I raced 404 Clydes at 200-205#, and until you've sprinted out of a turn with a pair of Zipp clydes, you won't know what all the fuss is about. Hence Zipp's recommendation to "consider" them above 190 lbs. As I mentioned, Zipp says max weight is 275 but recommends other weight ranges based on stiffness and ride characteristics. The rim on the Clydesdale wheels, for instance, is the same as the non-clydes, just a higher spoke count.
    "Unless he was racing there was no way he could match my speed."

  6. #6
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    But really, you aren't "sprinting" so much with a 1080 on the back, at least not really. I run a 1080 back/808 front combo, which I really like, but to me it's less about getting up to speed than it is maintaining speed.

    I'd run a 900 if I didn't live in Charleston, and do mainly "coastal" triathlons with what I perceive to be windier-than-normal conditions. Also, to respond to a comment from above, I'm currently doing a bit of my training with these wheels on the tri bike for two reasons:
    1. Too lazy to switch out cassette/brake bads/wheels regularly
    2. Want to train to control the wheels, which is difficult (or at least, different enough from normal situations) in crosswind conditions.

    After my Half IM this month, I'll switch back to some 40mm deep clinchers for training purposes.

  7. #7
    Dirt-riding heretic DrPete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K-S2 View Post
    But really, you aren't "sprinting" so much with a 1080 on the back, at least not really. I run a 1080 back/808 front combo, which I really like, but to me it's less about getting up to speed than it is maintaining speed.

    I'd run a 900 if I didn't live in Charleston, and do mainly "coastal" triathlons with what I perceive to be windier-than-normal conditions. Also, to respond to a comment from above, I'm currently doing a bit of my training with these wheels on the tri bike for two reasons:
    1. Too lazy to switch out cassette/brake bads/wheels regularly
    2. Want to train to control the wheels, which is difficult (or at least, different enough from normal situations) in crosswind conditions.

    After my Half IM this month, I'll switch back to some 40mm deep clinchers for training purposes.
    How much do you weigh? Being over 200#, I found that even 100mm rims were pretty crosswind-friendly.
    "Unless he was racing there was no way he could match my speed."

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPete View Post
    How much do you weigh? Being over 200#, I found that even 100mm rims were pretty crosswind-friendly.
    And that's a good point, I'm at 160 and steadily decreasing. Also, crosswinds in coastal Charleston (particularly near the beach) can get pretty nasty regardless of weight.

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