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Old 11-11-09, 01:15 AM   #1
mfinder
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Triathlon Bike for Road Riding

Hey everyone,

I have been looking for a road bike for a long time now, but have been given a great offer on a triathlon bike. I have been reading up on triathlon bikes since the offer, but I wanted to ask some people who may have more experience with both before I made a decision. I will primarily be riding on smooth road trails, but will also use it to commute in a city over short distances (about 1 mile that is mostly straight). If anyone could reply before tomorrow, that would be greatly appreciated. The bike is in basically mint condition and is my size. If it helps, here's the bike: http://www3.cannondale.com/bikes/02/...odel-2RM2.html

Thanks!
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Old 11-11-09, 07:47 AM   #2
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If it´s your size and a great deal, go for it. You can always sell it on in the spring.

Bear in mind that model has the modern tri geometry, with a steep seat tube angle. Try it first to see that this position is comfy. You´ll have a lot of weight on the front end, this bikes are designed to be ridden in the aerobars in an aggressive, flat-backed position.

If you are planning on doing lots of group rides I would hold off and wait for a road bike though. What kind of training/racing are you planning to do? Solo or in a group?

If you´re using it for commuting make sure you have somewhere safe to put it, as that bike is extremely stealable.

Last edited by Barchettaman; 11-11-09 at 07:52 AM.
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Old 11-11-09, 07:51 AM   #3
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Take it and enjoy life on the road.
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Old 11-11-09, 09:02 AM   #4
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As Barchettaman said, make sure its comfortable for you, it very well may not be. Also the riding position on a tri bike isn't really conducive to city commuting (even in a striaght line), or places where you will need maneuverability (road trails). Its harder to shift (since you have to reach forward if you have your hands on the brakes) or harder to brake suddenly (since you will have to move your hand back to the brake if you are in the aero position).

IMO I would pass on it and get a road bike for your situation, I think you will be happier and safer.
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Old 11-11-09, 10:13 AM   #5
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I've tried commuting on my tri bike a couple of times, and didn't care for it. Here's why:

1. My bike is set up to be ultra comfortable in the aero position. When riding in traffic, I don't find many opportunities to get aero and wind up using the pursuit bars, which gets tiring after a few miles.

2. The forward seat position of a tri bike shifts your weight out over the front wheels. This makes the steering very twitchy. The bike was made to go in a straight line really fast, not to slalom through city streets. More than once I've found myself in trouble halfway through a curve when I went in too fast and the bike doesn't want to lean over to make the turn.

3. Having the shifters on the bar ends and the brakes on the pursuit bars means that when riding in traffic, you always have your hands in the wrong spot for something you need.

4. The 120 psi tire pressure I normally run in my tri bike wheels beat me to death on a pothole infested street. I probably could reduce the tire pressure to alleviate some of this.

This is not to say I don't like my tri bike. When racing or training on the open road it is an incredible machine and carries out its intended purpose very well. It just isn't the best choice for riding around traffic or in groups.

So I bought my road bike to assist my commuting needs and relegate my tri bike for training and racing. Unless you're actually interested in doing triathlons (which are a lot of fun, but not everyone's cup-o-tea) I would pass and get a bike that is designed for the style of riding you want to do.
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Old 11-11-09, 03:52 PM   #6
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As long as you are not planning on drafting, road racing, or anything that requires close proximity to many other bikes at the same time, then go for it, maybe you will get into tri's too.

If you are planning on putting on drop bars, and racing at any uci events, then keep looking, it would not be good for you
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Old 11-11-09, 04:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tundra_Man View Post
I've tried commuting on my tri bike a couple of times, and didn't care for it. Here's why:
1. My bike is set up to be ultra comfortable in the aero position. When riding in traffic, I don't find many opportunities to get aero and wind up using the pursuit bars, which gets tiring after a few miles.

2. The forward seat position of a tri bike shifts your weight out over the front wheels. This makes the steering very twitchy. The bike was made to go in a straight line really fast, not to slalom through city streets. More than once I've found myself in trouble halfway through a curve when I went in too fast and the bike doesn't want to lean over to make the turn.

3. Having the shifters on the bar ends and the brakes on the pursuit bars means that when riding in traffic, you always have your hands in the wrong spot for something you need.

4. The 120 psi tire pressure I normally run in my tri bike wheels beat me to death on a pothole infested street. I probably could reduce the tire pressure to alleviate some of this.

This is not to say I don't like my tri bike. When racing or training on the open road it is an incredible machine and carries out its intended purpose very well. It just isn't the best choice for riding around traffic or in groups.

So I bought my road bike to assist my commuting needs and relegate my tri bike for training and racing. Unless you're actually interested in doing triathlons (which are a lot of fun, but not everyone's cup-o-tea) I would pass and get a bike that is designed for the style of riding you want to do
.
What he said plus the steep seat tube angle (probably 78 degrees) makes handling different and puts more weight on the front wheel and that makes stopping different.

I would never consider commuting where I do on a tri bike just because of traffic, a lot of stop and go, and the need for sudden turns and stops. It's even hard to train near my house on a tri bike for the same reason.

Unless you plan on doing tri's or tt's, skip this bike and get a road bike.
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Old 11-11-09, 06:55 PM   #8
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most people on this page own at least two bikes. I commute on a fixed gear in the city.
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Old 11-16-09, 02:08 AM   #9
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get a road bike
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Old 11-16-09, 10:47 AM   #10
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I'd steer clear of a tri bike as a commuter, or even a bike to do group rides on. Group rides with a tri bike, if you aren't experienced in riding in a group, is difficult to brake on as well as navigate turns properly. A lot of good useful responses here so take heed.
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