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  1. #1
    Triathlon in my future??? flip18436572's Avatar
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    Cadence question for running

    What is a good or normal cadence range for running?

    Is it similar to biking where you want to have a faster turn over rate?
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  2. #2
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    I don't think so. Maybe some of the elite runners pay attention, but I think for mortals, you let your stride length and pace dictate your cadence. Running isn't like a bike, where you can shift gears to adjust cadence, while maintaining a constant speed. Slower cadence in running means you're going slower (or making conscious changes to your stride, which generally isn't a good thing).

  3. #3
    Senior Member Plainsman's Avatar
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    My coach has advised me to run at a higher cadence with a shorter stride. I aim at a turnover of 180 foot falls per minute, which would equate to about 90 rpm (90 strikes with each foot). I've also been learning to methodically shorten my stride. Running is my weakest discipline, but increasing my turnover and shortening my stride has helped. I actually run with my mp3 as a metronome sometimes to make sure I'm staying with the right cadence until it is automatic. One goal is to leave your feet on the ground as little as possible. I got this method from a book by Ken Meirke. I actually do mentally "shift gears" when running up hills. I pick up my cadence and shorten my stride. Don't know if that is text book, but it seems to help me. If you do a quick Google search on Pose running method or Chi running you will get a lot of food for thought.
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    Joe Friel talks about this method in his books its call Pose running. It is meant to reduce loads from foot fall impact on the knees and change the muscle groups used for running. However if you do not running like this right now expect to have to train with it for several years to get the benefits. I worked with it for 6 months and found that any time I though about what my stride and pace where then changed them there was a 10-20% increase in my HR over not think and hitting a set pace. Some follow on studies have shown that the impact loads are just redirected to the ankle and foot not eliminated.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Plainsman's Avatar
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    I think I do recall reading something about impact load transferrence. The main reason I have read for the shorter stride is to stop the "braking" effect of a foot that lands too far out front. You make a good point. It does take some getting used to. At first I felt like I was taking baby steps, and I'm not sure if one can really ever TOTALLY change their running style. I think I arrived at a hybrid that for me equated to an overall improvement (and I had lots of room for it!)
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    I'm about the same as plainsman. I didn't really totally change anything but my forward footfall is close to my body and I foucs on pushing more.

    There isn't as much of a braking action as one would think because the when your feet move under you it acts as a wheel with a series of paddles on it. Its much closer to when you foot is BDC on a bike stroke or the like. Bicycling Science books cover some of this concept.

  7. #7
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
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    you will find out when you run more. I found it useful to try several different tempos on the street; track & treadmills. I now know my comfort zone. I've had an issue with trying to increase my speed and stride too quickly and strained my achilles. I've also had minor knee surgery so I am very careful about foot placement and protecting my body by finding my fastest most durable but safe tempo. I can even run 5 strides on the treadmill at speed level 6 with my eyes closed just for fun! :-)

    I think this is all where this expression comes from: "finding your stride"
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  8. #8
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    Actually most runners can benefit form longer strides. That's why most elite runners work on lengthening strides through downhill running. But it's important to not "brake" with your feer as others have said. The best way to overcome this is lean forward going downhill with toyr torso and haed perpendicular to the ground. Most people tend to tilt their head and upper body backward in doiwnhills which promotes the braking action. The secret is literally throw your upper body twonward the bottom on the hill.

    It takes time to learn how to lengthen your stride and injures resulst if you do it too quickly. The secret to getting faster is opening your stride without decreasing your natural cadence.
    You're just trying to start an argument to show how smart you are.

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