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Old 02-19-10, 06:20 PM   #1
J DeLuca
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Butt pain on the trainer

Man my ass kills after an hour on the trainer. Not on the road though. Anyone have a similar problem? What kind of shorts are you wearing? I wear my regular cycling shorts. It's not chaffage buy a deep muscle soreness.
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Old 02-20-10, 10:18 PM   #2
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Are you riding the same bike on the trainer and the road? If you are - your pedal stroke may be different on the trainer vs on the road. You may be pedalling smoother on the road and working too hard on the trainer.
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Old 02-21-10, 12:15 AM   #3
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Did you lower your saddle while on a trainer? If not, your hamstings, quads and glutes would be extended by the lift of the trainer. About an inch or so. That's probably the culprit. Measure the saddle to ground on the bike off the trainer, then adjust your seat post to the same height while on a trainer. Plus, you got a sharper angle there because of the lift, but that is a smaller issue and you can deal with it by sliding your saddle a bit backwards.
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Old 02-21-10, 07:42 AM   #4
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You really need to try and explain that. How can the bike change it's geometry just because it's off the ground by a couple of inches? The distance from the saddle to the pedals remains static.

I have found that I work harder in the saddle for longer periods of time without moving or changing positions. It's just grind, grind, grind. Sometimes you have to sit up, or stretch a little while riding just as you would while you are on the road.
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Old 02-23-10, 12:23 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by EjustE View Post
Did you lower your saddle while on a trainer? If not, your hamstings, quads and glutes would be extended by the lift of the trainer. About an inch or so. That's probably the culprit. Measure the saddle to ground on the bike off the trainer, then adjust your seat post to the same height while on a trainer. Plus, you got a sharper angle there because of the lift, but that is a smaller issue and you can deal with it by sliding your saddle a bit backwards.
Yeah this isnt right.

It's most likely because you are moving around a little more on the saddle (not standing, etc) while on trainer.

I switched to Adamo saddle for my TT bike and love it.
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Old 02-23-10, 06:49 PM   #6
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You really need to try and explain that. How can the bike change it's geometry just because it's off the ground by a couple of inches? The distance from the saddle to the pedals remains static. .
It's basic trigonometry. And has to do with head angle and seat angle. The distance to the pedals does not matter. If you lift your rear wheel by 2 inches and have your front wheel where it is, you are making the ST angle sharper by a degree relative to the TT angle, which will put more pressure on the back of your legs. Another solution is to move the saddle back by about half of what the lift is.
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Old 02-23-10, 11:43 PM   #7
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Dear EjustE: When you use a trainer you should also always use a "riser" to equal the height of the front wheel with the height of the rear wheel. If you do not put anything under the front wheel you will feel like you are pedaling down hill. This puts allot of pressure on your hands/shoulders/ neck and other unpleasant riding conditions. You do not change anything on your bike when you use a trainer (except maybe a rear skewer). When you get your position dialed-in the last thing you want to do is change something just to ride a trainer.
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