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  1. #1
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    Looking for tips for training

    Hello,

    I'm not actually training for a triathlon but I thought you guys might have some insight on training for several events.

    I'd like to give mountain bike racing a try, the first race I'm looking at is on May 7. My wife also announced that she wants to ride a century this year, and there's a 5k race in June that I want to run in. Do you have any advice for training for mountain bike racing, a century and running a 5k or two?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Can i get a WOOT WOOT swimbikerun_boy's Avatar
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    try and find local a club. The people are usually very helpful in starting you off.

    Hope this helps

    Peace
    Tyler

  3. #3
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    mountainbike: depends on what kind of race it's gonna be: downhill, xcountry, lots of hillclimbing, and of course the length of the race

    5k run: you will obviously want to work on speed rather than endurance. training for the mountainbikerace whilst training for a 5k run isn't exactly harmonious. but in order to become a fast runner, you will have to do intervals!
    5-7 x 1000m with relatively short recoveries in between (Say 400m *slow* jogs).

    and working on technique is good! jumprope, and different kinds of technical runs in general...

    that's just a very very basic outline on things to keep note of... for specifics we would need more info...

  4. #4
    MHR
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    I will try – by the way "mountain biking is about the only sport I haven’t ruined - by entering some sort of race and turning it into some sort of competition".

    Yes - Triathletes are masters of multi-sport training, maximizing time, and being efficent in the training with the little time we do have. This year (as I did last year) will compete in between 25 to 30 races.
    Like Lance Armstrong says:
    You cannot just tell people your committed – You cannot just say you’re dedicated – You cannot simply talk about your strength, your grit, your perseverance – You have to prove it, and I do that every day with the only measure of success "trying to be a better athlete than I am right now - not what the next guy is doing". Because frankly - the other guy needs to worry about keeping up with me.
    Before I go on, I will say that YES I work more than a full time job, and no I'm no spring chicken either or a gifted athlete. I'm almost 47 and I just work hard plain and simple.

    For example here are a few of my "Key Races" this year: The year started out with the
    Walt Disney Marathon in January (My sixth Walt Disney marathon in a row - where I ran a Boston Qualifing finishing time), Currently I'm training for
    Boston Marathon Patroits Day Apr 18,2005 (my 4th in a row there),
    Bolder Boulder 10K, then
    1/2 Ironman Triathlon Orlando, Florida May 22, 2005,
    Garden of the Gods 10-mile race
    Boulder Peak Olympic Triathlon July 24, 2005,
    5430 1/2 Ironman Triathlon August 7, 2005
    Pikes Peak Assent (1/2 marathon staright up) & Marathon (back to back Saturday and Sunday) August 20 & 21, 2005
    Hopefully Back to Kona for Ironman in October
    Plus 3-other 1/2 marathons, several other 5 and 10k's as well mixed in there somewhere.

    - In Spring/early summer I compete in a Thursday night open water swim 1-mile and run a 5k race series for 10 races/weeks.

    - In Spring I also compete in a Cycle Time Trial race series of like 8 races every Wednesday night.

    I take the philosophy that I can and do, at almost any point in my season - compete in "ANYTHING" from a 5k - to - an Ironman Triathlon. I want to be in that kind of condition - so to get to your question how do you do such a thing like race 3-races, a mountain bike race, a century and a 5k??
    Well there is really no difference between what you would like to do and what I do. It's simple really, and like baking a cake - all the ingredients are basiclly the same no matter what the sport. It's more about how you put them together and how much of what - when - is the variable in question.
    I will use running as an example in training for a marathon.
    A. General aerobic runs
    B. Tempo runs - or runs where there is a warm-up, a faster pace for a distance, and a cool down.
    C. Hill work
    D. Middle Distance runs
    E. Speed Work/Intervals
    F. Long Runs
    G. Taper
    H. Race
    I. Reverse-Taper
    J. **start new cycle for new race
    You can do pretty much the same thing riding road bikes, mountain bikes or swimming the basic components/ingredients are the same - then there's technique, which is really learned through experience or short cuts (or improved efficiency) can be learned through a coach, a training group of like minded individuls or even through a forum like this - through the exchange of information and ideas.

    Fundamentals for multi-sport training
    1. Take 1-sport and use it as your "main aerobic conditioning", for me that would be running in that I log nearly 65/miles on average/week on 6 days (peaking near 90, depending on the race) - year round - I have no off season - using Sunday as an off day from running, as rest is just as important. So for you it may mean 5 - 6 days/week riding your mountain bike, a trainer or a road bike or combination of each, just so you implementing some sort of daily routine from which areobic conditioning takes place.

    2. I actually use races (minior ones) as stepping stones to larger "Key Races" as part of my training. I also use shorter races as a form of speed work. **Maybe for you the 5k's can be the fun/minor races used as part of training for the Century and Mountain bike racing.

    3. Add strength conditioning to your training, for me that means 3x/week for 1-hr, total body, high reps (15x, 3 sets, 70% of max). **For you than may mean 1 or 2 times/week.

    4. Mini bricks: by this I mean doing 2 workouts in the same day.
    For me that could mean either run/bike, run/strength swim/run run/strength train whatever. The basis is to increace your aerobic time in training and working on specific skills.
    I actually do this every day - some days I do 3 workouts ie. run 9, bike 20, strength train for 1-hr.

    5. For a marathon I do weekly long runs or lsd (long slow distance) of 15, 18, 20 or 22 - for a triathlon I do bricks. In that I add... say an 80 mile ride prior to my long run. Switching the emphsis on the cycle or run each week ie bike-80 run 15, next week bike 60 run 20. **So for you maybe you and the wife ride on saturday 20 miles on road bikes in training for the century, then run 1 - 3 miles..this is your brick. This type of training teaches your body to use fat as fuel - something that comes into play for events of longer distance or time, like a marathon or even a century ride. In longer training is also race/event prep in that you test the fuels you will use (or the ones that will be provided in the event), as well as the gear you will wear.
    You don't want any surprises in race day.

    6. Make it fun - for me on Sunday my fun day, I run to my local rec center (just 4.0 miles), swim 1600 meters as hard as I can go, and run 4.0 miles back home. I make a game of it to see how quick I can get this done.

    7. Keep a training log so you can chart your progress and note the weekly effort you have accomplished, total miles/total time. If you use an HRM, log that data too. It's a great resourse to look back at and also a daily motivation tool. **For your use you may want to mark your key event(s) - then work backwards to determine how much time you have to train, then fill in a training plan for the weeks prior.

    8. Use a Hard - Easy approach to training.

    Without designing some sort of personal training plan - this is basically it - sure there is a ton more and for some they need to buy a big book to figure this out - or maybe 3-4 books. Any way...best of luck in your racing season and above all have fun!
    Last edited by MHR; 02-07-05 at 09:31 AM.

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    @MHR: wow! great post!

    however, a lot of us out here are probably gonna feel a little intimidated and meager reading your schedule...

    i would just like to point out to chris (because i think he and his wife are on a much more novice level than you) that rest and recovery is just as important as training.
    for MHR a 5, 10k run or even a half marathon is basically booked as training, at some points i'm sure even as a "recovery" run with him going "only" 70-80% (or do you actually ALWAYS go 100%??)

  6. #6
    MHR
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    Yes, Absolutely I agree 100% rest is a key component that's why I only run 6 days/week rather than 7.

    Look the point I'm trying to make here is that it doesn’t matter if your Peter Reid or just watched an episode of how 5-others lost weight on Opera and now you have a spark of motivation. The basic ingredients are the same - diet, aerobic, anaerobic, strength training and rest. Make a plan and stick to it, and have fun doing it. Life is too frick'n short you need to make the most of it.

    See (using my cooking example) the only difference between a master chef and what the average person could do with the same ingredients is huge (mostly because of experience) and the reason why a guy like Lance Armstrong or a Peter Reid do what they do among their peers. Sure there's some natural talent involved - but in the rank of most of us age groupers the differnce is perception of one's limits and experience. If you had a chance to do step for step, working side by side, what the master chef does when say making a cake - yours may be pretty darn close. training is no differnt. Sure we are all at differnt levels - but if you imitate success - chances are that you will be successful too.

    One day at work a bunch were talking about which diet they were on and how they lost 15 lbs - Atkins - Southbeach - whatever. I just smiled - they said what's your secret?? (not knowing what I even do) I said I'm on the Kona diet...they all looked puzzled and said wow what’s that...I said it's simple...and you can eat whatever you want and as much as you want...(I now have about 15 people listening....)
    The key is all you have to do is train 4-hrs/day for Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii. I quickly lost the room - not that I had it in the first place. The problem is most people (in general) are looking for a silver bullet, a shortcut - the problem is there no shortcuts - it takes hard work plain and simple. The only shortcut is to learn from the mistakes of others or the ones you experience. On another point, there is a big differece in just signing up for a race/event doing it at a comfortable pace - or - really racing it, pushing your limits. Some people like to ride century rides pretty hard - for others it's an easy 15mph pace.

    Everyone starts somewhere - it doesn't matter if it's your first 2-mile walk, your first 5k - or your first Ironman - it really doesn't matter, as long as your doing something rather than sitting on the sofa day-in-and day-out. You surly don't need to do what I do - to be in shape or have fun doing it in a local 5k or a century ride. I have very specific goals - for me, and I'm not trying to impress anyone except me. The thing is to that some people also set artificial limits on what they are cabable of, for someone just starting out may believe a 5k is all thay can handle (and it may be true - at first), then to think of doing multiple events are just out of the question. If you ask an Ironman triathlete about limits - they will most likley just smile and say what limits? It's just a matter of perspective - see were are all actually on the same path, some may have just been down that path before, or have been out on the path a little longer.

    Combining multiple sports into a training program is something I have been doing for a very long time, and I know that "how I train" (what training methods) "the way I train" (how I apply the methods) has got me to this point. I just wanted to outline some simple components of training anyone could use for multi-sport training.

    So do I always go 100% ???
    Sure I have hard days, and most of the time 2-hard days in a row (sometimes 3) - but recovery runs/rides are important also, and the reason I train with an HRM. A perfect tool on those recovery specific training days. Thanks for asking that question as it is an important point...and I added that as #8 to list in the first post. In my haste to throw something together I missed that point.
    It is also very important not to leave your "race" in training. By that I mean most people will feel really good as a race or major event approachs (in your taper weeks) and you feel the need to go hard. If you designed you taper week(s) correctly you can keep intensity up, because the duration is much much lower.
    Last edited by MHR; 02-07-05 at 09:47 AM.

  7. #7
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    once again: wow!

    you are now officially a new rolemodel for me (right up there with laird hamilton, julie moss, the hoyts, duke kahanamoku)!

    you have heart!

  8. #8
    On Your Right ZackJones's Avatar
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    MHR: I finally figured out your forum Handle Maximum Heart Rate Awesome posts!

    Chris: I can't help with MTB. I tried it twice, crashed both times and knew then that I was meant for the road.

    Here's some general pointers that would apply to the century and 5K training.

    - Pick your events now and plan your schedule around those events. This allows you to plan your gradual build up to each event.

    - Include recovery weeks in your training. For me this is every 4th week. For 3 weeks I do progressively longer workouts. On the 4th week I cut my workout distance in half. Your body needs a break now and again and recovery weeks give it that break.

    Are you planning on doing the century with your wife and is she planning on running the 5k's?

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the advice everyone!



    Quote Originally Posted by ZackJones
    - Pick your events now and plan your schedule around those events. This allows you to plan your gradual build up to each event.
    The first mountain bike race is May 7. The 5k race I want to do is in early June, after that I don't know how much running I will be doing. Running has always been real hard for me and if this year is as unpleasant as last year it might be the only 5k I do although I will probably still run shorter distances. We haven't decided on a century yet, she is thinking later in the year so we have more time to get in shape but I don't know if we have to wait that long.


    Quote Originally Posted by ZackJones
    Are you planning on doing the century with your wife and is she planning on running the 5k's?
    The century was her idea and I'm trying to talk her into the 5ks.

  10. #10
    On Your Right ZackJones's Avatar
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    If it were me I'd concentrate on the MTB race since it's first and do a little running. After the MTB race concentate on the 5K and use off days from running to keep your legs loose.

    Tell your wife you'll do the century with her if she'll do the 5K with you. Let her know that even if she walks it that's cool

    Good Luck!

  11. #11
    Senior Member Da Godfather's Avatar
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    well my running calender is
    Monday morning 5 mile tempo at <30 min or 4 1 mile repeats at 5 min pace afternoon- 4 miles M-F
    Tuesday morning Weights and 5 miles at 7-7:30 pace
    Wednesday morning 12 400m's at 70sec w/ 100m walk (drop 1 sec per week)
    Thursday morning Weights and 5 miles at 7-7:30 pace
    Friday morning 8 miles at 7:30 pace
    Saturday off
    Sunday 10-15 mile long run at 7-7:30 pace
    Last edited by Da Godfather; 02-17-05 at 03:27 PM.
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  12. #12
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    MHR,

    You maintain an awesome work out regime...wow is right....can you give us some of your personal best times (sprint, Olympic, Marathon etc.) that this discipline has yielded you on various distances? Your training pace on the run/bike/swim.....I am about your age so just wondering what we may aspire to.....

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