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Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

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Old 03-18-17, 03:50 PM   #1
Luminous
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Chainless bicycle for heavy load

My work involves using my bicycle for delivery, so I am loading huge bicycle bags on and I am on my way.

i938DOTphotobucketDOTcom/albums/ad227/monique_meijboom/061011-1328001DOTjpg
^image is a random from the internet but describes my job exactly.

I am tired with the chain problems and I was thinking of alternatives. Every one and a half or two years I need to invest for a new bicycle because the money that I will be giving for changing chain and new sprockets is overwhelmingly high! I chose to have as a second bicycle the Giant Triple X CS2 with the very wide tires. When I began having problems with the front hub (wobbling) and the front sprocket I chose the next model of Giant Triple X CS2 (the one I currently have). I am satisfied with this bicycle except that it is weak, perhaps because of the kind of job that I need it for. Both on the first and later on the latter model (the one I currently own) I had the same problems: wobbling of the front hub, and weakness at the front sprocket. I have to be very gentle when pedaling because if I simply exert my normal pedaling I will start hearing cracking noises from the front sprocket...

Each Saturday is a difficult day for me and today it was even more difficult because I had problems with my braking (coaster brakes). I guess the coaster brake needs to be cleaned because it kind was like braking 30% the whole way! Which made me exhausted, like cycling with another person on the back of the bike! :/

Some months ago I learned about the cardanas system or the dynamic shaft. Today that I visited again the pages of some of the manufacturers I saw that most of them have removed their cardanas bikes (Vogue). And others, like Brik, they added also bikes with the classic chain system, which they didn't have before. Other pages were completely blank, which made me think that perhaps the cardanas system has problems?

Do you guys have a clue? Also, what would you propose for a transporter bike?

Thanks in advance
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Old 03-20-17, 08:05 PM   #2
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Thanks in advance
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Old 03-22-17, 05:31 PM   #3
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link did not work (did swap out dots)

your bike looks like what I would guess be a common commuter/everday use bike for flatland use

it sounds like you are so overloading it beyond what it was designed to do and that is is wearing out.

maybe some thing like a Baksfiets (second picture) that is designed for more load would be better

I am not aware of any really successful shaft drive bikes, especially for heavy duty use.

the only other possible option might a be belt drive (requires specific frame and gear) the third pic is a danish butchers and bikes cargo bike with belt drive but it is over 5000 euro

here is a link to bike brands with carbon belts instead of chains Bike Brands with a Carbon Drive? System | Gates Carbon Drive?





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Old 03-23-17, 05:32 AM   #4
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Shaft drive bicycles have some engineering issues. Humans can produce a decent amount of torque, and the shaft tends to be fairly slender. Result: wind-up when pedalling hard. A sorta stretchy rubberband feel to it.
On top of that, you need two bevel gears to change the direction of rotation. Bevel gears have a lot more losses than a chain drive.


You say "money that I will be giving for changing chain and new sprockets is overwhelmingly high!"


I really don't get that. A Shimano sprocket for an IGH is like 3 EUR. A chain 7 EUR. A new crankset 15-30 EUR.


40 EUR in parts for a 650 EUR bike doesn't sound that bad. Unless you're getting overcharged for assembly. Or there are other parts needing replacing too.


Wearing out front hubs is really rare. I'd be inclined to think they weren't properly assembled/lubed/adjusted from the start.
If it was me, I'd do two things - check that they were OK when I get them, and if you're using rim brakes on the front - simply buy a new front wheel when needed. Rear wheels usually break before fronts, so used front wheels tend to be easily and cheaply available.


Coaster brakes are generally fine for casual riding, but it sounds like you're not doing casual riding.


Overall it seems like you're using your bike too hard.
That leave you with two options:
- accept more maintenance and repairs
or
- buy a bike that's better suited for the purpose. Or upgrade yours until it's good enough.


Some things you can't avoid. Even if you were to run a 1/8" chain in a fully enclosed chaincase, there will be some wear. Eventually that chain and sprocket will need to be replaced. Belts are supposedly better, but have their own drawbacks.


All brakes (so far) work by friction. Either you pick some that are known to be long lasting, like 90 mm drum brakes, or some were replacement parts are readily accessible, like disc brakes.
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Old 03-23-17, 10:23 AM   #5
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If you were to fully enclose the chain and have it damp with oil it would last a long time..
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Old 03-25-17, 11:25 PM   #6
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I am not sure what you mean by costs of chain and sprockets vs new bike. Any bike needs to be maintained. If you do not watch the chain wear, you will ruin precipitously the sprockets and potentially chainrings. Even though I mostly use my bike for commuting, I need to change the chain once a year. The cost of a chain is minor. Sprockets tend to be a bit more expensive but not a big deal either. This level of maintenance I usually do myself and if your work revolves around a bike, it would be good if you started fixing your bikes yourself. For a work bike, I would go with a steel rather than alu frame as more durable. I ponder whether a coaster brake poorly stopping a loaded bike is not accelerating the chain wear. The wobbling hub indicates that you need to change bearings. You seem to run your bikes to the ground, while a good well maintained bike might well outlive the owner.
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Old 03-26-17, 01:39 AM   #7
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Here in the USA, it is common for bike owners to also acquire the tools, and learn to do their own maintenance. Of course, not everyone, and bike shops are kept busy working on bikes. But, those that put on lots of miles (without a pro team sponsor) usually do their own maintenance.

Watch the chain, and replace every couple thousand miles as it begins to stretch.

If the front wheel is "loose", then bearings may be loose. It might be a simple adjustment. Or, if it wobbles as it spins, it either has a broken spoke, or needs truing (or both). And, periodically the bearings need to be cleaned and lubed, a pain to do, but not too hard of a task.

I've only dealt with coaster brakes on kid's bikes, and don't get heavy use. I have heard the brake shoes do eventually wear out.

It looks like the Shimano rebuild hit is only $2 more expensive than buying the complete hub.
https://www.amazon.com/Coaster-Brake.../dp/B00288N5AO
But, you could probably rebuild a hub for less than replacing a wheel...

Anyway, nothing is insurmountable. If you aren't breaking chains, then just plan on replacing them every couple thousand miles to help reduce wear throughout the drivetrain. A belt drive might be nice, although they will wear (2x the life of chains?). The upfront capital cost is higher, but it may be worth it to you. You still would have to maintain the front wheel and other parts of the bike.

Shaft drive is another option. I don't have longevity info on them. Presumably the gears will last a longtime if well maintained. But, I can't say how well the systems would hold together being used for heavy loads and lots of riding. It still might be a good experiment.
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Old 03-26-17, 06:12 AM   #8
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Drive shaft bikes have been around since at least the 30's, but never caught on because of the mechanical loss and the little advantage over fully enclosed chaincases. It's dirt, sand and rust that makes a chain wear out fast, with a full chaincase a drop of oil every year and a chain replacement every 10 years is usually enough.
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Old 03-26-17, 10:17 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
link did not work (did swap out dots)

your bike looks like what I would guess be a common commuter/everday use bike for flatland use

it sounds like you are so overloading it beyond what it was designed to do and that is is wearing out.

maybe some thing like a Baksfiets (second picture) that is designed for more load would be better

I am not aware of any really successful shaft drive bikes, especially for heavy duty use.

the only other possible option might a be belt drive (requires specific frame and gear) the third pic is a danish butchers and bikes cargo bike with belt drive but it is over 5000 euro.
Hi squirtdad. I have exactly that Giant Triple X same model, same color!
I guess I am overloading it yes, because I am working with it, delivering mail with two bicycle bags on each side of the luggage carrier. Each bag fits in 30 - 35 liters.

Bakfietsen (cargo tricycles) would be a good option but they have their disadvantages: big, heavy, one needs a place to store them to keep them safe, which I don't have.

Belt drive bicycles seem like a good alternative, except that they are expensive when it comes time to replace parts. And here in the Netherlands I have found belt drive bicycles in very reasonable prices (below 800 euros) but as for delivery bicycles with belt drive I managed to find only one, and it lacks a rear luggage carrier.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dabac
Shaft drive bicycles have some engineering issues. Humans can produce a decent amount of torque, and the shaft tends to be fairly slender. Result: wind-up when pedalling hard. A sorta stretchy rubberband feel to it.
On top of that, you need two bevel gears to change the direction of rotation. Bevel gears have a lot more losses than a chain drive.


You say "money that I will be giving for changing chain and new sprockets is overwhelmingly high!"


I really don't get that. A Shimano sprocket for an IGH is like 3 EUR. A chain 7 EUR. A new crankset 15-30 EUR.


40 EUR in parts for a 650 EUR bike doesn't sound that bad. Unless you're getting overcharged for assembly. Or there are other parts needing replacing too.


Wearing out front hubs is really rare. I'd be inclined to think they weren't properly assembled/lubed/adjusted from the start.
If it was me, I'd do two things - check that they were OK when I get them, and if you're using rim brakes on the front - simply buy a new front wheel when needed. Rear wheels usually break before fronts, so used front wheels tend to be easily and cheaply available.


Coaster brakes are generally fine for casual riding, but it sounds like you're not doing casual riding.


Overall it seems like you're using your bike too hard.
That leave you with two options:
- accept more maintenance and repairs
or
- buy a bike that's better suited for the purpose. Or upgrade yours until it's good enough.


Some things you can't avoid. Even if you were to run a 1/8" chain in a fully enclosed chaincase, there will be some wear. Eventually that chain and sprocket will need to be replaced. Belts are supposedly better, but have their own drawbacks.


All brakes (so far) work by friction. Either you pick some that are known to be long lasting, like 90 mm drum brakes, or some were replacement parts are readily accessible, like disc brakes.
Hi dabac and thanks for your suggestions (actually thank you all for your input, I appreciate). Speaking of shaft drive bicycles, the past week I was searching and searching online for alternative options for a new bicycle and I found a comparison for chain/shaft/belt but for motorcycles! So, if the shaft drive system wasn't good enough then perhaps motorcycles wouldn't invest on it furthermore? Really don't know, just trying to find out.

About the high costs that I mentioned, twice in a year I have paid 111 euros (that means 222 in one year) to change the chain, chainrings, sprockets etc. because (according to the manager that owns the business and also works there) there were teeth broken and other parts that were necessary to be replaced. And pretty much I believe him, if I judge from the heavy use of my bicycle, it seems normal. What I didn't know was the cost for each of these parts.

About front hubs, it's the second time happening in my current bicycle, it occurred in my second bicycle as well (Giant Triple X model 2010). In my first bike (a grandma bicycle from the -then new- Dutch company BSP) I must have also had the same issue with the front hub after some months, if I remember well. But for sure I had the same issue with the front hub on both of my Triple X bicycles. Btw the BSP was a sturdy bicycle for its value.

In my understanding, I had the fully enclosed chain case in a lower level than the open chain, but after some research the previous week I think I am getting it. In my mind I thought that the fully enclosed chain case was pain in the ass when it comes time for maintenance, but I didn't think of the fact that because it is indeed fully enclosed, it is protected from the rain and dust and thus it needs less maintenance than the open chain type.

Coaster brake helps me a lot because I can have free hands to pick up the mail and/or carry it on my left arm, without the need to reach for hand brakes. Brakes are a secondary factor to my case, actually I never had problems with my coaster brakes (all three of my bicycles had coaster brakes).

Quote:
Originally Posted by fietsbob
If you were to fully enclose the chain and have it damp with oil it would last a long time..
I actually did that -but my chain isn't fully enclosed- some months ago and when the repair guy saw my bicycle he expressed his disapproval, telling me that too much oil does equal damage, because it makes the chain much softer. Since then I oil with a wide paint brush (spraying the oil on the paint brush) but I have to do this at least every two weeks. Other wise the chain dries out. But in the case of my bicycle (with the open case) then I guess the excess oil would attract more dust ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2_i
I am not sure what you mean by costs of chain and sprockets vs new bike. Any bike needs to be maintained. If you do not watch the chain wear, you will ruin precipitously the sprockets and potentially chainrings. Even though I mostly use my bike for commuting, I need to change the chain once a year. The cost of a chain is minor. Sprockets tend to be a bit more expensive but not a big deal either. This level of maintenance I usually do myself and if your work revolves around a bike, it would be good if you started fixing your bikes yourself. For a work bike, I would go with a steel rather than alu frame as more durable. The wobbling hub indicates that you need to change bearings.
Hi 2_i and thanks for your reply. I must have been neglecting the appropriate maintenance of the chain, perhaps because I wasn't taking into consideration the heavy use of my bicycle, so I had in my mind a more loose period for maintenance. But because of the heavy use I should have oiled the chain more frequently. I have tried once to replace the chain myself and I finally did it, but the next time I couldn't. I ended up damaging the chain and I had to buy another chain. That discouraged me from trying to fix my own bicycle in the future-which would be the best.

Uhm... about steel/alu, I really enjoy that my current bicycle is soooo lightweight!!! Plus, I never had problems (as I had with the metal BSP grandma bicycle, which was like dancing from the extreme wobbling hehe!) A steel bicycle would be more heavier. I already have to carry the weight of the mail, so it would be too much and at the end of the day I would feel exhausted. For the same reason I chose a bicycle with fat tires/gears/kevlar tires, because without gears I would come home exhausted and the fat/kevlar protected tires makes riding so much carefree, absorbing the bumps on the street, acting as suspension without the weight of a suspension fork! The past 9 years that I am doing this job, I think I have calculated a lot of pros and cons when it comes to choosing a bicycle, the only thing I still have problems with is the parts that involve transmission and weight (wheel hubs, crankset etc.) which are too weak for me and the way I use my bicycle, as a delivery bike that is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2_i
I ponder whether a coaster brake poorly stopping a loaded bike is not accelerating the chain wear.
That's a very interesting observation! and I don't know if finally that's the case of the significant wear of chain and chain parts so quickly. I guess could only test that with a same bicycle but with hand brakes. What you mentioned seems to make sense, whenever I have to reverse the pedal/chain motion in order to brake, the chain and the parts involving the chain and the transmission must have difficult times with all that weight on the bicycle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2_i
You seem to run your bikes to the ground, while a good well maintained bike might well outlive the owner.
I'm not totally sure what you mean with "to the ground", I guess you mean that I wasn't paying attention to proper maintenance (which I already answered above^)

Quote:
Originally Posted by CliffordK
Watch the chain, and replace every couple thousand miles as it begins to stretch.

If the front wheel is "loose", then bearings may be loose. It might be a simple adjustment. Or, if it wobbles as it spins, it either has a broken spoke, or needs truing (or both). And, periodically the bearings need to be cleaned and lubed, a pain to do, but not too hard of a task.

I've only dealt with coaster brakes on kid's bikes, and don't get heavy use. I have heard the brake shoes do eventually wear out.

It looks like the Shimano rebuild hit is only $2 more expensive than buying the complete hub.

But, you could probably rebuild a hub for less than replacing a wheel...

Anyway, nothing is insurmountable. If you aren't breaking chains, then just plan on replacing them every couple thousand miles to help reduce wear throughout the drivetrain. A belt drive might be nice, although they will wear (2x the life of chains?). The upfront capital cost is higher, but it may be worth it to you. You still would have to maintain the front wheel and other parts of the bike.

Shaft drive is another option. I don't have longevity info on them. Presumably the gears will last a longtime if well maintained. But, I can't say how well the systems would hold together being used for heavy loads and lots of riding. It still might be a good experiment.
Hi pal and thanks for your input. I don't know if you talk about the rear hub, because I had/have problems only in the front hub of the wheel. 3 months ago was fixed at the repair store but again it is wobbling from one side to the other, about 0,5 cm off the vertical axis of the wheel.

As I was/am searching about belt drive and shaft drive I believe I am getting closer to their philosophy. Two times cyclists with shaft bikes (from Brik company) passed by me and I didn't have the time to ask them for feedback. Feedback from a random owner riding that bicycle is valuable, since their input doesn't involve financial profit of any kind.

You say belt drives wear twice as fast than chain?? wow! kind of surprised to read that. And if that's the case and having in mind their higher maintenance cost then it doesn't seem as a good option for a delivery bicycle and heavy duty use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stadjer
Drive shaft bikes have been around since at least the 30's, but never caught on because of the mechanical loss and the little advantage over fully enclosed chaincases. It's dirt, sand and rust that makes a chain wear out fast, with a full chaincase a drop of oil every year and a chain replacement every 10 years is usually enough.
Hi Stadjer and thanks for your input. I wrote about the shaft drive above^ reminding the ones used on motorcycles, wondering if that can get us to a closer understanding of shaft drives on bicycles.

I didn't know about the fully enclosed chain that needs that little maintenance. So, for me and my heavy duty use, let's add two drops of oil hehe!
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Old 03-26-17, 10:18 AM   #10
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Can a mode please reduce the size of the first and third image at the post of squirtdad, because I don't have that wide resolution and it was difficult when I had to reply to the posts. Reading is fine, within the limits of my screen's resolution. Thanks.

Also, I couldn't reply because the forum system treated the URLs of others as my own, and I was getting the error message that I can't post URLs because I don't have 10 posts...
I had to go and find and delete the URLs from others in the quoted text...

Last edited by Luminous; 03-26-17 at 10:40 AM. Reason: corrected that I only had problems when replying, not reading the posts
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Old 03-26-17, 10:27 AM   #11
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After research I think I have found a bicycle that suits me. Google: WorkCycles Gr8 and it is manufactured here in the Netherlands!

I read from the specifications
Quote:
Load Capacity: Total of about 200kg
wow!


Gr8 (Great) is the lightweight version of Fr8. And if that amount of money is a bit too much, then I will go for something like a Gazelle HeavyDutyNL.
third choice: Sparta Pick-Up RN3 Dames Parallel
fourth choice: Cortina Milo damesfiets
fifth choice: UNION Load
sixth choice: Gazelle Esprit C3
seventh choice: BSP Metropolis

I will try to go for that WorkCycles Gr8 or at least for the second choice.

Last edited by Luminous; 03-26-17 at 10:41 AM.
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Old 03-26-17, 10:54 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
I actually did that -but my chain isn't fully enclosed- some months ago and when the repair guy saw my bicycle he expressed his disapproval, telling me that too much oil does equal damage, because it makes the chain much softer.
I am skeptical of this. I do not believe that you damaged your chain, fully enclosed, by adding too much oil. There is no reason not to wipe off the excess, but how does it damage? The grit is on the outside.

I would look for other explanations, perhaps periodic maintenance.

Quote:
Uhm... about steel/alu, I really enjoy that my current bicycle is soooo lightweight!!! Plus, I never had problems (as I had with the metal BSP grandma bicycle, which was like dancing from the extreme wobbling hehe!) A steel bicycle would be more heavier. I already have to carry the weight of the mail, so it would be too much and at the end of the day I would feel exhausted.

Not necessarily, a steel frame might add a couple of pounds and likely not even that.

How much does your current bike weigh? How heavy are the typical loads?

Quote:
Hi pal and thanks for your input. I don't know if you talk about the rear hub, because I had/have problems only in the front hub of the wheel. 3 months ago was fixed at the repair store but again it is wobbling from one side to the other, about 0,5 cm off the vertical axis of the wheel.
To me it's kind of weird to be replacing and repairing the front hub with no problems on the rear hub. Are you sure it's not just a matter of the cones getting loose?

By coincidence, I noticed a little play on the front wheel of my commuter Friday, and looked at it yesterday. I knew that it was just the cone needing tightening, but I checked the bearings anyway since it's been more than a year, cleaned them and added fresh grease. Cones back on and adjusted, good as new and it took about 20 minutes with zero cost. I suspect that you're looking at the same situation and suggest, given that your issue is cost of maintenance and repair, that you procure a cone wrench and add this procedure to your basic maintenance regime.

Quote:
Hi Stadjer and thanks for your input. I wrote about the shaft drive above^ reminding the ones used on motorcycles, wondering if that can get us to a closer understanding of shaft drives on bicycles.
Unless the technology has improved since I looked into it, shaft drives on bicycles don't save you a whole lot of maintenance. It's a different sort of maintenance but you still have to periodically get into them, lubricate and replace worn parts, and it appears to be a much bigger hassle than with chains.

High quality belt drives can theoretically last much longer and might be maintenance free during their lifetime for all I know, but suffer from requiring either single speed or internal planetary gears which are going to rob some of your power. Also the belt drive itself, when tensioned properly, is apparently less efficient than a well maintained chain. I'm not sure that either of these options are optimal considering your requirements of both efficiency and reduced maintenance.
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Old 03-26-17, 11:30 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
About the high costs that I mentioned, twice in a year I have paid 111 euros (that means 222 in one year) to change the chain, chainrings, sprockets etc. because (according to the manager that owns the business and also works there) there were teeth broken and other parts that were necessary to be replaced.
This is a sensible price for this scope of a job, but if you changed your chain consistently with it getting worn out, you would need to change your sprockets only every 3-5 changes of chain and chainrings maybe 10-20. When you ride with a worn out chain you make 1 tooth do the work meant for 4-6 teeth. No wonder they snap. With the worn out parts your whole riding should be getting less efficient, impacting your job performance for no good reason.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
I'm not totally sure what you mean with "to the ground", I guess you mean that I wasn't paying attention to proper maintenance (which I already answered above^)
Apologies, I used a common US idiom, which stands for running something to death.
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Old 03-26-17, 02:31 PM   #14
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Hi dabac and thanks for your suggestions (actually thank you all for your input, I appreciate). Speaking of shaft drive bicycles, the past week I was searching and searching online for alternative options for a new bicycle and I found a comparison for chain/shaft/belt but for motorcycles! So, if the shaft drive system wasn't good enough then perhaps motorcycles wouldn't invest on it furthermore? Really don't know, just trying to find out.
WRT motorcycles, humans as engines are high-torque and low-rpm.
WRT motorcycles, a motorcycle engine has no objection to the feel of a fraction of one rotation disappearing into wind-up of the driveshaft.
WRT motorcycles, fitting a larger-diameter shaft more resistant to wind-up does not add significant width to the design as a whole.
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Old 03-26-17, 05:03 PM   #15
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Someone posted this a few days ago.

https://elephantbike.co.uk/

Apparently they only ship to the UK and Africa, but if you are in Europe, perhaps you could figure out a way to get one. It might be the perfect bike for your mail delivery.

And they should be built to last, although they still will need periodic maintenance.
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Old 03-27-17, 06:25 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
Hi Stadjer and thanks for your input. I wrote about the shaft drive above^ reminding the ones used on motorcycles, wondering if that can get us to a closer understanding of shaft drives on bicycles.

I didn't know about the fully enclosed chain that needs that little maintenance. So, for me and my heavy duty use, let's add two drops of oil hehe!
You could say that a motorcycle is about managing excessive power and a bicycle is about getting insufficient power through most efficiently. A drive shaft in a motorcycle is quite interesting because together with the front suspension it's making the front wheel dive countering the 'wheely-force', but I don't think that's of any relevance to bikes.

I think the drive shaft for bikes was invented as an alternative for the oil bath chaincase, which I can imagine is not easy to work on. But as I understood it there was some development in chain technology in the first half of the 20th century that made the oil bath redundant, instead a drop of oil just to lubricate the chain was enough.

Now bike manufacturers have to have something to distinquish them from other manufacturers, and when it's not weight it's got to be something else. The drive shaft looks nice and clean, and you can promote it as very low maintenance in comparison to an open chain. But it solves a problem that was already solved and creates a new one that won't get noticed easily: loss of power. The fully enclosed chaincase isn't always easy to take off, but to oil the chain you just have to open it a tiny bit and turn the chain while oiling. It's probably better to do that more than once a year, but without beeing exposed to the weather, dirt, water and salt (very bad for your bike!) it stays on the chain and stays clean. I always wonder why it needs a fresh drop at all, what's happening to the oil, does it disappear? Does it evaporate? Break down into a less oily substance?

Anyway, do regular basic maintenance yourself, notice issues with your bike before they get worse and start doing easy repairs and try more difficult repairs when you're getting more confident in your abilities. It's the labour costs that make it expensive and bringing it to the repair shop is time consuming too. But you don't need to become a fully competent home mechanic at once.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
After research I think I have found a bicycle that suits me. Google: WorkCycles Gr8 and it is manufactured here in the Netherlands!

I read from the specifications wow!


Gr8 (Great) is the lightweight version of Fr8. And if that amount of money is a bit too much, then I will go for something like a Gazelle HeavyDutyNL.
third choice: Sparta Pick-Up RN3 Dames Parallel
fourth choice: Cortina Milo damesfiets
fifth choice: UNION Load
sixth choice: Gazelle Esprit C3
seventh choice: BSP Metropolis

I will try to go for that WorkCycles Gr8 or at least for the second choice.
I don't know about the second choice. It's a good bike but it's a consumer bike, for heavy consumer duty, not for heavy professional duty.

Maybe should take a look at Azor.nl, they ar usually cheaper than workcycles, more Gazelle category. I admit I'm a fan of the company for a lot of different reasons, but you can pick and choose the parts and frame and they are all about reliability, sturdiness and durability.
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Old 03-27-17, 09:40 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
After research I think I have found a bicycle that suits me. Google: WorkCycles Gr8 and it is manufactured here in the Netherlands!

I read from the specifications wow!


Gr8 (Great) is the lightweight version of Fr8. And if that amount of money is a bit too much, then I will go for something like a Gazelle HeavyDutyNL.
third choice: Sparta Pick-Up RN3 Dames Parallel
fourth choice: Cortina Milo damesfiets
fifth choice: UNION Load
sixth choice: Gazelle Esprit C3
seventh choice: BSP Metropolis

I will try to go for that WorkCycles Gr8 or at least for the second choice.
looking at both I think you would be better off with the workcycles fr8 (link to comparison Bakfiets en Meer Workcycles Fr8 vs. Gr8: What?s the Difference?)

other than that you may with to learn more about bike maintenance and work and do you own work, which as I understand it not really the norm in the Netherlands.
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