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Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

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Old 03-22-07, 06:14 PM   #101
I-Like-To-Bike
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I picked up two Columbia's at local garage sales, $5 each. Both are equipped with S-A AW 3 speed hubs. The yellow one was bought specifically for the purpose of being a flower basket holder in the back yard. The brown one I dunno, there was room in my garage, so why not. It is a garage mate for my wife's 1960 AMF Hercules,also with a S-A AW hub, also $5 at a garage sale.
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Old 03-22-07, 06:17 PM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wahoonc
...the hub was frozen solid and was a mass of rust. Not worth the effort on an AW, considering I have probably 1/2 dozen or so NOS.
Probably would have required two squirts of oil rather than one.
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Old 03-23-07, 10:58 AM   #103
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Modern British threespeeds in North America: In addition to the mentioned Breezer Citizen and Freedom and Electra Amsterdam Classic and Sport, KHS offers the basic but bargin priced Urban Green, and Dahon has the Curve D3. Swobo's Otis is expensive and lacks fenders, racks and lights. Trek and RaleighUSA offer cruiser style three speeds (a different kind of bike).

Modern takes on the same idea include the Jamis Commuter 3.0, Bianchi Milano, Specialized Globe City 3.1, Cannondale Street Premium, Novara Fusion, Breezeer Uptown, Dahon MuXL & Ciao and Rocky Mountain Metropolis, all with 8 speed Nexus or Alfine hubs. Some have generator front hubs. Some have classic upright ergos, while others are more like flat bar road bikes.

If somebody just can't abide hub gears, the KHS Urban X and Diamondback Transporter are similar but with derailer gearing.

The recent North American Handbuilt Bicycle Show was chock full of city bikes:
http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech/2007...ults/nahmbs071

TCS
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Old 03-23-07, 11:21 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by tcs
Modern British threespeeds in North America: In addition to the mentioned Breezer Citizen and Freedom and Electra Amsterdam Classic and Sport, KHS offers the basic but bargin priced Urban Green, and Dahon has the Curve D3. Swobo's Otis is expensive and lacks fenders, racks and lights. Trek and RaleighUSA offer cruiser style three speeds (a different kind of bike).

Modern takes on the same idea include the Jamis Commuter 3.0, Bianchi Milano, Specialized Globe City 3.1, Cannondale Street Premium, Novara Fusion, Breezeer Uptown, Dahon MuXL & Ciao and Rocky Mountain Metropolis, all with 8 speed Nexus or Alfine hubs. Some have generator front hubs. Some have classic upright ergos, while others are more like flat bar road bikes.

If somebody just can't abide hub gears, the KHS Urban X and Diamondback Transporter are similar but with derailer gearing.

The recent North American Handbuilt Bicycle Show was chock full of city bikes:
http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech/2007...ults/nahmbs071

TCS
Wow--nice pics of some amazing commuter bikes!
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Old 03-23-07, 12:46 PM   #105
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Originally Posted by tcs
Modern British threespeeds in North America: In addition to the mentioned Breezer Citizen and Freedom and Electra Amsterdam Classic and Sport, KHS offers the basic but bargin priced Urban Green, and Dahon has the Curve D3. Swobo's Otis is expensive and lacks fenders, racks and lights. Trek and RaleighUSA offer cruiser style three speeds (a different kind of bike).

Modern takes on the same idea include the Jamis Commuter 3.0, Bianchi Milano, Specialized Globe City 3.1, Cannondale Street Premium, Novara Fusion, Breezeer Uptown, Dahon MuXL & Ciao and Rocky Mountain Metropolis, all with 8 speed Nexus or Alfine hubs. Some have generator front hubs. Some have classic upright ergos, while others are more like flat bar road bikes.

If somebody just can't abide hub gears, the KHS Urban X and Diamondback Transporter are similar but with derailer gearing.

The recent North American Handbuilt Bicycle Show was chock full of city bikes:
http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech/2007...ults/nahmbs071

TCS
What great bikes.
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Old 03-23-07, 01:07 PM   #106
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I love the ANT bikes, both the blue and the black ones.

Regarding style, which I think is key to a revival of sorts for the commuter bike, these well done racks hit the nail on the head. I love them integrated into the bike like that. To me, the rack and fenders are essentials, and the lights, too, although to a lesser extent.
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Old 03-23-07, 01:41 PM   #107
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
I picked up two Columbia's at local garage sales, $5 each. Both are equipped with S-A AW 3 speed hubs. The yellow one was bought specifically for the purpose of being a flower basket holder in the back yard. The brown one I dunno, there was room in my garage, so why not. It is a garage mate for my wife's 1960 AMF Hercules,also with a S-A AW hub, also $5 at a garage sale.
If you ever find more $5 Columbias, you can send them to me.
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Old 03-23-07, 01:41 PM   #108
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These may be suitable for a flat country like the Netherlands. . .

. . . but they would never due for West Virginia, which is not called "the Mountain State" for no reason. We have some streets here in Charleston with a greater than 19" grade. Unless one is very atheletic, a singlespeed or three-speed is just not practical here.
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Old 03-23-07, 04:34 PM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thdave
I love the ANT bikes, both the blue and the black ones.

Regarding style, which I think is key to a revival of sorts for the commuter bike, these well done racks hit the nail on the head. I love them integrated into the bike like that. To me, the rack and fenders are essentials, and the lights, too, although to a lesser extent.
My favorite was the fork mounted full thermos mount.
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Old 03-23-07, 04:47 PM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thdave
There's a whole generation of kids in North America who haven't ridden on well equipped bikes, like the English 3-speeds. They riide mountain bikes, even if they live in the plains. They don't know that a bike can be transportation.
I concur. I did not learn what a pleasure a bicycle could be until I purchased my first road bike as an adult. And I did it on a whim, not knowing how awesome it would be.
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Old 03-23-07, 08:53 PM   #111
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I remember my first bike. It was a five-speed 'motorcycle'-styled yellow one with butterfly handlebars and a banana seat, from Montgomery Ward; I was eleven (I had balance issues so didn't learn to ride a bike until later than many of my peers). When I was fourteen I replaced it with a three-speed 'English racer' type, also from Wards. That took me through HS and college. Then, for many years, I didn't bike at all, or very occasionally using a friend's machine. At 40 I started again with a Trek mountain bike I bought second hand. After it got stolen, I bought my current machine which I've been riding for about five years now, a Fuji Monterrey Hybrid, which back in February I converted to an Xtracycle.
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Old 03-23-07, 09:45 PM   #112
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I have four bikes, including a Mikado (a Canadian company, but the bike was made in Taiwan despite the Japanese name) 3 speed from the early 90s (all cromoly steel, purchased in 94 for $119 band new). It is one of the last English 3 speed style bikes made and sold before the new generation.

For some reason, I always default to that bike when riding for transportation and/or commuting around the city (Chicago). The upright position, sprung saddle, generator light, fenders, chainguard and internal gearing are just the right combination for most of my urban tansportation and also for some light recreational riding (anything under 35 miles at a pace below 16 mph). Lots of folks ask me where I got my bike and if they are still available. Unfortunately, they are no longer made. The new Breezers are beautiful, but why the thick tires and high end price for a basic transportation bike. Computers are cheaper and better than they used to be. Bicycles should be cheaper and better now too.
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Old 03-26-07, 07:49 AM   #113
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Originally Posted by chicagobent
I have four bikes, including a Mikado (a Canadian company, but the bike was made in Taiwan despite the Japanese name) 3 speed from the early 90s (all cromoly steel, purchased in 94 for $119 band new). It is one of the last English 3 speed style bikes made and sold before the new generation.

For some reason, I always default to that bike when riding for transportation and/or commuting around the city (Chicago). The upright position, sprung saddle, generator light, fenders, chainguard and internal gearing are just the right combination for most of my urban tansportation and also for some light recreational riding (anything under 35 miles at a pace below 16 mph). Lots of folks ask me where I got my bike and if they are still available. Unfortunately, they are no longer made. The new Breezers are beautiful, but why the thick tires and high end price for a basic transportation bike. Computers are cheaper and better than they used to be. Bicycles should be cheaper and better now too.
Interesting post. I strongly agree with the thought--a good, low cost basic transportation bike is called for. The Breezer is fairly high end, although they are a good value. I think you can buy the Freedom for around $325, but it doesn't have lights. Regardless-- I still hope others could beat that price.

I initially had a tough time buying the Breezer because of the 1.5" wide tires (which actually are 1.75"), so it's funny you state that. There are a couple of points the salesman made, however, that convinced me these were ok. The wheels are smaller --so a wider tire is appropriate. He said that the small wheeled recumbants run faster with wider tires than they do with narrow ones. I don't know if that's the truth or not, but I bought into it. The other thing that convinced me is that you can put 75 psi in them. That's a lot of pressure.

I got to say that I enjoy riding on these wheels more than I do on the 32's I have on my hybrid. They just handle road variations better; also, it's nice being a little closer to the ground. Note that these new generation commuter bikes are not modified English 3-speeds. They use modified mountain bike frames and if you ride those bikes, you will recognize the feel of these bikes. It is significantly sportier and more responsive than the old style Raleigh 3-speed.
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Old 03-27-07, 07:07 PM   #114
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Originally Posted by closetbiker
A store in Vancover sells those "Amsterdam" style bikes and is doing very well.

Jorg & Olif is the only company in North America to sell Dutch city bikes. Their bicycles, sourced from a small traditional factory northeast of Amsterdam, are priced from CAD 875 for a 1-speed Oma (hers) or Opa (his) version. Three and eight speed versions are also available. The company currently only ships within Canada, and operates from a gallery-like lifestyle store in Vancouver. (in downtown Vancouver, about 33 per cent of people travel by foot and bicycle, approximately 28 percent take transit, and 39 per cent drive)
Guess Napa Style wanted in on the action.
http://www.napastyle.com/store/produ...ategoryId=S001

Got their catalog today and was floored by this bike in it.
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Old 03-28-07, 07:28 AM   #115
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While I love the looks of that Opa 3 speed, I can never get over that double top bar. Why does it need it? Isn't that twice as heavy as a single bar?

Irregardless, that is a piece of transportation. No doubt about it.
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Old 03-28-07, 07:43 AM   #116
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Originally Posted by thdave
While I love the looks of that Opa 3 speed, I can never get over that double top bar. Why does it need it? Isn't that twice as heavy as a single bar?

Irregardless, that is a piece of transportation. No doubt about it.
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Old 03-28-07, 02:39 PM   #117
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I don't really get what everyone's saying about good old 3-speeds' being expensive or hard to come by. Here in beautiful Somerville, Mass., I see Raleighs, Robin Hoods, and other brands all the time - at bike shops, on craigslist, and in the trash (for several years, I had a 40-year-old 3-speed that I found in the garbage with a perfectly working hub and decent frame).

Maybe the Boston area, having strong ties to the old country and being generally a repository of old stuff, is different than the rest of the U.S.?
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Old 03-28-07, 04:34 PM   #118
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Originally Posted by Ya Tu Sabes
I don't really get what everyone's saying about good old 3-speeds' being expensive or hard to come by. Here in beautiful Somerville, Mass., I see Raleighs, Robin Hoods, and other brands all the time - at bike shops, on craigslist, and in the trash (for several years, I had a 40-year-old 3-speed that I found in the garbage with a perfectly working hub and decent frame).

Maybe the Boston area, having strong ties to the old country and being generally a repository of old stuff, is different than the rest of the U.S.?
Must be...two of mine have come out of MA We have NOTHING of any real quality in my part of the Deep South when it comes to vintage British stuff. My theory is they didn't sell very many of them down here because people couldn't afford them. The wage base and education level was much lower down here for many many years.

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Old 03-28-07, 09:58 PM   #119
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They're so expensive here in Portland because the demand is so high. Even the Chicago Schwinn electroforged bikes are quite spendy.
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Old 03-28-07, 11:57 PM   #120
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I'm always amazed at how many 3-speeds you can see on the street in lower Manhattan, or in Greenwich Village at least. And yeah, Somerville/Cambridge/Boston too.
In Honolulu the only one I've ever seen is mine (scored in Massachusetts and brought over from NY)...

location location location I guess
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Old 03-29-07, 10:00 PM   #121
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Hey! That's my bike, 'cept mine's blue. I'd rather have had the red, but that's life. Mine came with those utterly STUPID Woods valved tubes which I swapped out for schraeders at first flat time - but otherwise I love my bike!
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Old 04-01-07, 10:35 PM   #122
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[QUOTE=tcs]Modern British threespeeds in North America: In addition to the mentioned Breezer Citizen and Freedom and Electra Amsterdam Classic and Sport, KHS offers the basic but bargin priced Urban Green




Anyone know the retail price of the KHS? I was very interested in the Electra Amsterdams but now I think I prefer the geometry (no "Flat Foot technology"), front brake and overall "English" appearance of the KHS Green.
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Old 04-02-07, 02:32 AM   #123
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This is really classic and vintage fodder, but I thought some of you here might enjoy seeing a project I'm working on. It's to be a lightweight version of the classic Raleigh sports. I started with a nice old Dawes Galaxy 531 frame, with gorgeous half chrome stays and forks, and a chrome fork crown. A 40 year old Brooks, a set of lightweight Bluemels mudguards (with a chrome effect strip down the middle for more blingage), a Sturmey Archer AG (3 speed, with a generator rear hub) wheelset, bars, and shifter from a 3 speed I got from the tip for 5, a Pletscher rack I had laying about, and I'm nearly there. The rear wheel needs a spoke replacement, I've got a stuck cotter in the old cranks (going to fit cotterless), I have to transfer the chainguard from the other bike, and I need a rear light to go with the fabulous front one, but it's looking good already. There's no need to ask for new 3 speeds, when so many are already out there!

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Old 04-02-07, 06:20 AM   #124
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This is really classic and vintage fodder, but I thought some of you here might enjoy seeing a project I'm working on. It's to be a lightweight version of the classic Raleigh sports. I started with a nice old Dawes Galaxy 531 frame, with gorgeous half chrome stays and forks, and a chrome fork crown. A 40 year old Brooks, a set of lightweight Bluemels mudguards (with a chrome effect strip down the middle for more blingage), a Sturmey Archer AG (3 speed, with a generator rear hub) wheelset, bars, and shifter from a 3 speed I got from the tip for 5, a Pletscher rack I had laying about, and I'm nearly there. The rear wheel needs a spoke replacement, I've got a stuck cotter in the old cranks (going to fit cotterless), I have to transfer the chainguard from the other bike, and I need a rear light to go with the fabulous front one, but it's looking good already. There's no need to ask for new 3 speeds, when so many are already out there!

I love it! Love those old lights, and the looks of a Brooks saddle, especially one that has been worn. I love it in black.
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Old 04-02-07, 08:36 AM   #125
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Originally Posted by thdave
I love it! Love those old lights, and the looks of a Brooks saddle, especially one that has been worn. I love it in black.
Then you appreciate my old Brooks. Comfortable from Day one, better now.

The B-66 is on my current commuter. It was OEM on a 1976 Raleigh Superbe I bought in 1976. The B72 was OEM on a Raleigh Sports I bought in 1972. The rivets in the back all had to be replaced by pop rivets after breaking during years of hard use. No preservation or treatments ever applied to either saddle. Only care was to cover with plastic bags if left outside for many hours when rain could be expected. The B72 was recently retired and replaced by another B66.
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