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-   -   Post your utility bike thread (http://www.bikeforums.net/utility-cycling/331199-post-your-utility-bike-thread.html)

duppie 07-02-09 12:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Lesar (Post 9061821)
Here is a shot of my recently completed CETMA Cargo.


http://i370.photobucket.com/albums/o...sar/CETMA3.jpg

That is the first CETMA Cargo I see in the wild.
Do you mind talking a little about your experiences so far? Build, ride, purchase process, etc.
It appears to have an IGH with a chain tensioner? I would love to hear more about it!
Duppie

christian_piper 07-02-09 03:02 PM

Well I just recently completed my first utility bike- took my old trek hardtail 4300, put sefas drifter tires on, put a cheap used rigid fork on the front, (Green!) and got 2 wald baskets.

The rear carriers are on there all the time, the front grocery basket, I consider removable. (I am looking for some material like chain slap gaurds, clear smooth and strong, to put on the handlebars to prevent scratching when I take the basket on and off.)
Also, being a quick release bike, the front wald basket legs didn't have anyplace to mount onto, so I had to improvise, and the rear carriers mount wouldn't fit around the rear tube (designed for dual tubes in that area, and smaller) - to get that to work I had to drill 2 new holes farther apart in the wald bracket, and buy longer (stainless steel) bolts. I also threw some rubber in there so it wouldn't damage the bike. The baskets are pretty much level.

I call her multiple personality disorder, and she rides great! I also have a GPS mount you can see with the GPS on, (and off in the latest photo)

I am going to include close up shots of how I mounted the baskets.

Right after completion:
http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/4280/img0178g.th.jpg

The rear basket mount I had to fiddle with- the new holes I drilled make the bolts about half an inch wider:
http://img21.imageshack.us/img21/2979/img0174lzj.th.jpg

The front basket leg mounts- not the strongest solution, I could drill into the fork... but this is pretty good, and will support all the weight I would want to put in it:
http://img25.imageshack.us/img25/6761/img0173kwj.th.jpg

And for the last photo, today's errands. As you can see, no front basket today. Sticking up was fine, because I wasn't going very far, and the handling was pretty good. There was more in the other side balancing it all out.
(I really do need a new kickstand though... or at least slightly shorten my current one)
http://img43.imageshack.us/img43/1305/img0184y.th.jpg

Sixty Fiver 07-03-09 12:18 AM

After yesterday's parade... my diy longbike.

http://www.ravingbikefiend.com/bikep...bike09new6.jpg

John Lesar 07-03-09 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by duppie (Post 9208241)
That is the first CETMA Cargo I see in the wild.
Do you mind talking a little about your experiences so far? Build, ride, purchase process, etc.
It appears to have an IGH with a chain tensioner? I would love to hear more about it!
Duppie


So far I am very happy with the bike. I built it from a frameset since I had most of the parts to complete the build. The craftsmanship looks good with nicer welding than I have seen on other bikes. The lack of water bottle cage bosses would be my only negative so far, but you can rig something.

I am using a Shimano Alfine 8 speed IGH with a Soulcraft Convert tensioner. I like this tensioner because it doesn't rely on a spring for tension and has a feature to allow it to swing out of the way when removing the wheel. Shimano dynohub. Avid BB7 discs. Schwalbe Big Apples. Nitto Albatross bars and Periscopa stem. Brooks Champion Flyer. Since the picture was taken I have installed some Wald chromed steel fenders which have much better coverage. Everything installed without any fuss or modifications.

It does take a few miles to get used to the handling. I have no problem using it as an everyday bike. I have used it for my 20 mile RT commute to work. I haven't carried anything too heavy yet, probably less than 50 lbs so far, but it wasn't an issue for the bike or handling. I wish I could compare it with other bikes of this type but there is nothing like this in my area

Purchasing was easy through the CETMA site. I got a call from Lane within a few hours to confirm the purchase. A few days later I got my tracking number and a week or so later it was at my door.

John

YoKev 07-06-09 05:29 AM

I picked up this little number over the weekend :) I think we're going to have some fun.

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...S/IMG_6766.jpg

dwnptrl_777 07-06-09 05:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevinsubaru (Post 9225470)
I picked up this little number over the weekend :) I think we're going to have some fun.

What a score! Nice!

rtciv 07-06-09 08:15 AM

Wow, where did you get it, and how much did it cost, if you don't mind?

Do you have any pics of the gears and such?

BossCat 07-06-09 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevinsubaru (Post 9225470)
I picked up this little number over the weekend :) I think we're going to have some fun.

Nice pickup ;) Do I hear the clanking of spanners - the whiff of paint fumes, then its....

TAXI!!! :D

Regards
Tom

YoKev 07-06-09 10:06 AM

I got it from a local antique reseller who got it at an estate sale. The bike is really not that old, so don't let the rod brake fool you. I paid $150. Worse case scenario is I sell it for what I paid in better running order, or I have a great base for a trailer.

Generally it's in good shape. I'm giving it a good once over before I start riding it, but the craftsmanship is kind of lacking. It's got chinese branded parts everywhere, so I can't even read them to look it up online. Whatever:lol: Apparently, it came from a divorce that came from NYC.

It's a singlespeed drivetrain. The freewheel threads on to the rear axle just like you would on a normal bike, but there are two feet of threads to run it down. It came stock with a really junky 36t crankset, so I swapped it out for some Truvative cranks/Race Face bash guard/Blackspire 32t ring I had kicking around. I would expect it to be geared pretty ok now, but I have no idea really. As mentioned above, the front brake is a rod brake, and the rear is a ban type drum brake. It should do fine on flat ground.

I need to rustoleum some of the underbody, finish cleaning, buy a few bolts, and replace the headset bearings. Almost good to go! Once it's running, I'll have to decorate the cab and perhaps try my hand at a DIY canopy. I like the checkers idea :)

bluegoatwoods 08-07-09 01:35 PM

Here's mine......

bluegoatwoods 08-07-09 01:44 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Whooops....

I posted without including the photo.

Let me try again.......

sheba 08-11-09 08:51 PM

About a year ago I stumbled upon this bike on the web. This bike is made by Project Rwanda and has already been distributed to several thousand coffee farmers in Rwanda, hence the name. After a bunch of phone calls and unreturned e-mails, I finally found some coffee bikes in the US. I was able to get one shipped to me for a sweet deal.
The bike came fully ready to ride. Most of the parts were lower quality; I did quite a bit a work to get to the bike to where it is now. I semi-copied the extra-cycle freeloader bag system and sewed up my own bags with 1000 denier cordura nylon and heavy duty nylon webbing. The system works awesome. The bike handles great. This summer I rode it to Seattle, WA and back from my house in Eau Claire, WI; no failures.

Some pics.

Bare frame
http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/3788/bareframe.jpg

http://img43.imageshack.us/img43/4721/logomxqgfl.jpg

My homemade bags
http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/7034/emptybag.jpg

Glacier National Park
http://img38.imageshack.us/img38/677...iernatpark.jpg

Sixty Fiver 08-11-09 10:56 PM

sheba - That is simply spectacular.

I would love to get a few of these frames to build up and am guessing they are probably rock solid.

Sixty Fiver 08-11-09 11:01 PM

Nekkid pics...

http://www.ravingbikefiend.com/bikep...etch09new3.jpg

sebnukem 08-12-09 08:11 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Ah. I love posting pics of my bike as much as I love my bike. 43lbs as shown, with rain jacket, sun screen, air pump and bike lock in one pannier padlocked to the rack. The other pannier has a shoulder strap to use it as a carry-on bag.

I use it to commute, for groceries, fun and everything else. It's the only one I want to ride. http://imgur.com/yM0VC.jpg

Seb

terraskye 08-12-09 08:42 PM

Sheba~ I had to wipe the Homer Simpson drool off my laptop:) I want WANT WANT!!:)

But then again I also want 65'ers bike too which I've actually gotten to see in person.

badmother 08-13-09 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 9468086)
Nekkid pics...

Sixty, is it right that the chainstays of both the rear triangles are almost level w the ground? do not remember how mine is, must find that out.

Sixty Fiver 08-13-09 07:55 PM

Yep...my stays are almost even.

It makes for a little less pedal clearance but also drops the main frame a few inches which will even allow my little sister to ride the bike with the saddle lowered.

dwnptrl_777 08-15-09 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sheba (Post 9467338)
About a year ago I stumbled upon this bike on the web. This bike is made by Project Rwanda and has already been distributed to several thousand coffee farmers in Rwanda, hence the name. After a bunch of phone calls and unreturned e-mails, I finally found some coffee bikes in the US. I was able to get one shipped to me for a sweet deal.
The bike came fully ready to ride. Most of the parts were lower quality; I did quite a bit a work to get to the bike to where it is now. I semi-copied the extra-cycle freeloader bag system and sewed up my own bags with 1000 denier cordura nylon and heavy duty nylon webbing. The system works awesome. The bike handles great. This summer I rode it to Seattle, WA and back from my house in Eau Claire, WI; no failures.

:love:

twentysixtwo 08-16-09 05:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tyrell (Post 8236215)
Not the prettiest but it works for me!

http://lh3.ggpht.com/_eXOBm4Rp86o/SX...0/P1230529.JPG

How is the large green plastic basket attached. Doesn't it throw you off balance?









JK.


Good choice. GT bikes are bombproof.

neilfein 08-16-09 09:43 AM

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2434/...532a512a46.jpg
Taking my folding bike Little Red to the shop for a new handlebar post. they say it'll be ready on Wednesday.

Novara Randonee, pulling a Dahon Curve D3 in a Burley Nomad.

a quickr pickr post

Curious LeTour 08-21-09 01:07 AM

Hey twentysixtwo, thanks for making me laugh!

macfred 08-30-09 05:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chicbicyclist (Post 8665806)
I'm not done coating her handlebars...


Batavus Old Dutch traditional omafiet.
http://i177.photobucket.com/albums/w...elprincess.jpg

Everything is mostly stock except for the grips and the brooks.

It's considered a woman's frame but I'm comfortable enough to sport her, and I love look and the easy dismounts of loop frames.

Here`s an other dutch one called "Pastoor-Kruisframe"made by http://www.workcycles.de/lastenfahrrad/index.html

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2576/...63560808_b.jpg
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2583/...b9421196_b.jpg

andy

qmsdc15 08-30-09 01:50 PM

The pastor needs skirt guards too :) riding in his robes. I love the biblical reference of the cross in the frame. I love that bike. Thanks for posting pics. Is that Germany?

macfred 08-30-09 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by qmsdc15 (Post 9583903)
The pastor needs skirt guards too :) riding in his robes. I love the biblical reference of the cross in the frame. I love that bike. Thanks for posting pics. Is that Germany?

It`s in the Netherlands...Only a few miles out of Amsterdam.

andy


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