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Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

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Old 01-13-08, 08:18 AM   #1
EGreen
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Transporting a Pizza?

I am not crazy about the pizza places that deliver in my part of town. There are some great pizzerias that I can easily and quickly get to by bike, but am not talented or creative enough to figure out how to safely get home with the box.

Is there any easy and removable adaptation to my bike (my utility/beater/commuter bike being a single speed 80's Motobecane) or a special technique I can employ? Mind you, I am in a dense urban area so hands free riding is not an option.

Any help on this would be much appreciated!

Last edited by EGreen; 01-22-08 at 05:14 AM.
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Old 01-13-08, 08:20 AM   #2
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I carry mine bungied to my rear rack. Or " in my tummie."
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Old 01-13-08, 10:25 AM   #3
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Flat on the rear rack.
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Old 01-13-08, 10:34 AM   #4
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It might be worth it to get an inexpensive pizza bag and then put that on the rear rack

http://www.ultimatepizzabag.com/two_compartment_bag.htm

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Old 01-13-08, 10:47 AM   #5
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Thanks for that link. The place I like frequently has carryout only coupons.

I'm slightly alarmed, though. The bags are made of "imitation nylon"?
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Old 01-13-08, 10:52 AM   #6
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I once carried a pie (a homemade Bakewell Tart) on my rack for 5 miles. Not a huge success. If I did it again I would attach a board to the rack as a platform, probably zip-tie or tightly tie that down (through strategically drilled holes) rather than simply bungie it. The board would have a lip around its perimeter to stop the pizza box sliding off. Lightly bungie the box onto the platform, or use elastic net that motorcyclists use to hold down helmets. Not forgetting plastic bag for rain protection.

Scrap bubble wrap under box for extra olive retention.

Sounds stupid, but if you have the bits and are serious about pizza transportation, it could be made in 5 mins, would be easy to remove, and would work.

You do have a rack, don't you? If not a cheap seatpost rack would be sufficient, and could even be dedicated to the purpose.
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Old 01-13-08, 11:35 AM   #7
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Thanks for that link. The place I like frequently has carryout only coupons.

I'm slightly alarmed, though. The bags are made of "imitation nylon"?
I believe they have to say that to distinguish the material from cordura, which is far stronger, but much more expensive. These do the job, though...I see the local pizza guys using the four pizza box variety.
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Old 01-13-08, 12:11 PM   #8
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Is there any easy and removable adaptation to my bike (my utility/beater/commuter bike being a single speed 80's Motobecane) or a special technique I can employ?
I just built a front rack based loosely on the CETMA racks. http://www.cetmaracks.com/

mine cost about $13 in parts but I bought all new stuff, if you could find some scrap steel it could be built for about $3 in parts. I do own a conduit bender and a welder and drill press, but I think a completely "bolt together" version could be easily made with more basic hand tools. (Every guy should own a welder though... best. tool. ever.)

I just made it so I have not had time to post a separate thread about it but if you have questions about how I built mine, or how I would build one if I couldn't weld it together just let me know.


What it looks like on the bike.


1/2" conduit and 3/4"x1/8" steel, welded.


You can see how I set the rack high enough that it does not interfere with the headlight.
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Old 01-13-08, 01:01 PM   #9
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I just built a front rack based loosely on the CETMA racks. http://www.cetmaracks.com/

mine cost about $13 in parts but I bought all new stuff, if you could find some scrap steel it could be built for about $3 in parts. I do own a conduit bender and a welder and drill press, but I think a completely "bolt together" version could be easily made with more basic hand tools. (Every guy should own a welder though... best. tool. ever.)

I just made it so I have not had time to post a separate thread about it but if you have questions about how I built mine, or how I would build one if I couldn't weld it together just let me know.
A lot of good ideas here. The bag is a good idea - want to keep it hot, of course! And this CETMA type rack is a winner. The typical rack doesn't have enough platform for stable transport.
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Old 01-13-08, 01:25 PM   #10
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http://worksmancycles.com/shopsite_s.../indbikes.html

Scroll down to the bottom and you'll find a Pizza Bike ready-made for the occasion.
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Old 01-13-08, 04:00 PM   #11
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I just built a front rack based loosely on the CETMA racks. ...
You can see how I set the rack high enough that it does not interfere with the headlight.
Nice rack indeed. Although one has to be careful about the effects on handling that a heavy load may have on the bike. As with everything, a lot depends on front end geometry of that specific bike.

As for the original poster, if he has a rear rack, I would suggest adding such a platform (removable or not) on top of his rear rack.
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Old 01-16-08, 12:45 AM   #12
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I was riding along the Shining Sea Bike Path between Falmouth and Woods Hole, MA when a pizza delivery man passed me riding a bicycle. What was unusual about this was that he was holding the pizza in his arms in from him, his arms and legs not touching the handlebars. His bicycle had no front rack. How did he avoid falling over?
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Old 01-16-08, 01:56 AM   #13
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^^^

I can ride with no hands for miles. He likely had to balance the pizza with one hand while starting and stopping, though I once rode a bike for like 3 miles with no handlebars or stem. It's a long story.
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Old 01-16-08, 08:01 AM   #14
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Now this is a serious pizza hauler.

Delivery bicycle equipped with awesome steadycam-like gantry. These are used in Tokyo for pizza delivery - the device swings to keep your cargo level through corners, and is fitted with suspension to limit the bumpiness.

http://james.architectureburger.com/cargo/cargo.html
Attached Images
File Type: jpg cargo1.jpg (49.0 KB, 81 views)
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Old 01-16-08, 09:07 PM   #15
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I have a folding Wald basket on one of my bikes. The top is the same level as the back rack. A pair of them, one on each side would fold out to make a nice size platform and would also be useful for other things. Folded up they don't add much width to your bike.
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Old 01-17-08, 06:14 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michel Gagnon View Post
As for the original poster, if he has a rear rack, I would suggest adding such a platform (removable or not) on top of his rear rack.
Maybe, you're right. All other suggestions (not excluding this one) are creative and useful but too involved for the occasional pizza pick up. I guess this basic set up and some trial and error will evolve into a practicable way to get an intact pizza home.

Thanks all!
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Old 01-17-08, 06:22 AM   #17
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...will evolve into a practicable way to get an intact pizza home.
J/k, i do hope you can figure something out. If you already have a rear rack, I can think of a million ways to make a platform onto it that could have a pizza box bungee'd to it. This would be the cheap/easiest way but it would not justify buying a new bike so it's no good.
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Old 01-17-08, 12:11 PM   #18
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Maybe, you're right. All other suggestions (not excluding this one) are creative and useful but too involved for the occasional pizza pick up. I guess this basic set up and some trial and error will evolve into a practicable way to get an intact pizza home.

Thanks all!
Frame pump and a piece of yardstick/dowel under the box, cargo net over? I've got the same problem- it has to be something that can be kept on the bike, since you just don't know when you're gonna have to get a pie on the way home...
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Old 01-21-08, 01:25 PM   #19
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Bikes at Work's book PEDDLING FOR PROFIT discusses using a bicycle for pizza delivery; I haven't the book here, though, so I can't describe their solution.
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Old 01-21-08, 03:34 PM   #20
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. (Every guy should own a welder though... best. tool. ever.)
.
off topic...sort of What type.....any ideas on a easy light duty one?

thx
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Old 01-21-08, 06:28 PM   #21
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off topic...sort of What type.....any ideas on a easy light duty one?
I use a 110V flux core wire feed welder.

Pro's-
• I can plug it right into the wall in my garage (no need to wire a dedicated 220V plug)
• easy to learn
• relatively inexpensive (units start around $200 and moving north from there)

Con's
• messy welds, lots of spatter
• can't weld anything but steel (no aluminum, copper, brass, etc.)
• limited thickness of materials that can be safely welded

For a home hobbiest who just wants to play in his garage this is about the best thing you can get. It will allow you to fabricate or repair stuff around the house without the cost or inconvenience of larger setups. For 22 years I never needed to weld anything but in the couple months since i got the welder, I've used it at least a couple times every week. Amazing what you can do what you have enough tools.

I HIGHLY recommend an auto-darkening helmet ($50 at Harbor Freight or Northern Tool) makes welding so easy anyone can do it. PM me if you want more info about the setup I'm using.
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Old 01-22-08, 07:17 PM   #22
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You folks want to spend HOW MUCH on a pizza bag? My 20 x 20" one cost a whole $2.99. See the link I started about the Therm-A-Snap. When I go out for pizza, I U-bolt on an oven rack, take my bag with a couple of bungies, and go. Takes me less than a minute to switch my rig from baskets to racks.
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Old 01-22-08, 07:40 PM   #23
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You folks want to spend HOW MUCH on a pizza bag? My 20 x 20" one cost a whole $2.99. See the link I started about the Therm-A-Snap. When I go out for pizza, I U-bolt on an oven rack, take my bag with a couple of bungies, and go. Takes me less than a minute to switch my rig from baskets to racks.
I don't know where you are from (you didn't say), but here in New York , a Pizza Pie is 24" inches in diameter.
20" inches would be too small.
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Old 01-22-08, 07:43 PM   #24
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"I don't know where you are from (you didn't say), but here in New York , a Pizza Pie is 24" inches in diameter.
20" inches would be too small."

Well, 16" is about as big as they get around here. Are you sure you aren't from texas and not NY?
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Old 01-23-08, 12:24 AM   #25
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I am not crazy about the pizza places that deliver in my part of town. There are some great pizzerias that I can easily and quickly get to by bike, but am not talented or creative enough to figure out how to safely get home with the box.

Is there any easy and removable adaptation to my bike (my utility/beater/commuter bike being a single speed 80's Motobecane) or a special technique I can employ? Mind you, I am in a dense urban area so hands free riding is not an option.

Any help on this would be much appreciated!
Are you dedicated to the idea of eating your pizza at home? I've tried bungie-ing the box to the rack a few times, with limited success (the toppings end up on the box lid, usually). I've tried riding home with one hand on the handle bars and one hand holding the box, with tragi-comic results (I survived the fall, the pizza did not). I've even tried putting individual slices into Tupperware containers before putting them into a pannier (stupidest idea ever conceived since the invasion of Iraq). What I do now is this: I ride to my favorite local pizza place, which does not deliver, I sit down, I enjoy my pizza with a few beers, and then I ride home. Except for the beer, it costs the same, the pizza is nice and hot, the toppings are where God intended them to be, and I don't have to worry about anything.
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