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hotbike 06-23-10 04:08 PM

NFA Vehicles Type Eleven
 
NFA Vehicles Type Eleven
The Type Eleven has been constructed, after a long pause. For those of you following the progress of the NFA Vehicles "Think Tank" , you know it's been some time since Type Ten was completed. We started in 1986 with Type 1 and Type 2. Type 3 came in 1987. Type 4 was built in 1988. Type 5 and Type 6 date back to 1989. Type 7 was designed in 1992 by my Daughter Mellisa and her friend Patricia, and built the same year. Type 8 is being saved for last*. Type 9, designed by Mellisa, was built in Winter 1994-95. Type Ten has had many Variants, with the current #10 having been built in 2002.
Type Eleven comes along just in time for the 2011 model year, so I suspect there will be some confusion as to whether the "Eleven" refers to the model number or the year it was introduced?
Please search the forums if you wish to see photos of the previous "Human Powered Vehicles" which NFA Vehicles has produced.
Today, I present the NFA Vehicles Type Eleven, in Color Photographs:




http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0136.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0128.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0134.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0125.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0137.jpg







This Prototype contains NO Fiberglass, it is all Corrugated Plastic. This saved hundreds of hours of Labor. Some Steel bolts were used (quarter inch with 20 threads per inch, between 3/4 and an inch and a half long).

The Front Box Fairing is twelve inches wide and the Front surface is angled to beat the wind.

*Footnote on Type 8-Type 8 was to be "The Eightball", so I saved it for last.

Please go to the original thread, in the General Cycling Discusion , for the rest of the photographs:
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...es-Type-Eleven
I would appreciate comments from all of you in the Utility forum, since I think it went over their heads in General discusion.
What I failed to say is that this build was extremely cheap, using all recycled materials, i.e. the bike and the coroplast.

qmsdc15 06-23-10 05:29 PM

The best I've seen from you! The experience gained from previous models surely paying off. Keep up the good work.

squirtdad 06-23-10 05:57 PM

hotbike as usual I am stunned by the design of the bike and depth of the post on all levels. This reflects a simplicity that previous designs lacked

hotbike 06-24-10 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by squirtdad (Post 11009181)
hotbike as usual I am stunned by the design of the bike and depth of the post on all levels. This reflects a simplicity that previous designs lacked

Thank you for the wonderful comments, thank you, too, qmsdc15. "The experience from previous models" must be paying off, since this is the first time I managed to avoid monkeying with the brakes, or brake cables. The existing brake cables are in the clear, and did not have to be re-routed around any "sheet metal". And this frame has cantilever brakes, with cables in a "center pull" position.

I had started planning this on paper a couple of months ago (although I knocked it out in one 24 hour period) and on the sheet of paper, I wrote a note to myself, it said: "KISS", which is a little abbreviation for "Keep It Simple, Stupid". I'm glad I didn't over-complicate the design or installation.

I don't know whether to call this a basket, a box, or a fairing. I'll call the rear boxes panniers, but the front box has the simplest aerodynamic feature, a slightly slanted front panel. People in general (non-cyclists) don't even know what the words "fairing" and "panniers" mean. So I call this "Type Eleven".

I already put this bike to good use, I stuffed all my plastic grocery bags in it and took them to the supermarket for recycling.

In all, this set-up required 28 square feet of Coroplast (corrugated plastic), which was recycled/reused, from campaign signs the day after election day, 2008. I will have to hunt for more Coroplast this year, since my supply is dwindling .

I hope the photographs are clear enough for other builders to attempt their own build.

hotbike 08-04-11 07:35 AM

New REAR PANNIERS for the Type 11 are in the works. I have made a pattern in 1:6 scale (where one inch equals six inches) using 64# Bond paper. This way I have all the cuts and folds marked out, so I don't accidentally cut instead of fold, which is one thing that could ruin a sheet of Coroplast. It's kind of like the Japanese art of Origami. The sheet of coroplast is six feet by four feet, and the pattern is saying five feet six inches by two feet nine inches. I only have one shot at this. Keep your fingers crossed.

hotbike 08-04-11 02:58 PM

My earlier post was at 9:35 AM, it is now 16:41 (4:41 PM), and I have a load of photos to show you. Yours Truly has been very busy the last seven hours. But I now have a complete set of photographs to show everyone here in this class how to make your own Corrugated Plastic Panniers.

1) The Origami one sixth scale model that I made last night before going to bed:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0881.jpg

2) The Paper Model, the Plastic Board, a tape measure, and a permanent marker. (NOTE: As both the plastic and the marker are black, I had to use Blue Masking Tape to make visible marks):http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0884.jpg

3) Be careful to mark every line "FOLD" or "CUT", because if you cut when you should fold, you will ruin your sheet of Coroplast. (Thank you for crossing your fingers, I made no mistake):
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0886.jpg

4) Both the Board and the Origami original are marked with the letter "A", on the corresponding trapezoid panel, in order to obtain proper orientation:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0893.jpg

5) The Coroplast Plastic Board all marked up, ready for cutting:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0898.jpg

6) Cutting the Plastic Board with a sharp Knife:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0899.jpg

7) Be careful to ONLY CUT where intended, one mistake can ruin the project:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0901.jpg

hotbike 08-04-11 03:22 PM

Project Continued:

8) The Corrugated Plastic Board all cut out, ready for Creasing and Folding:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0902.jpg

9) Creasing the Plastic Board- Use BOTH Hands, press hard, with the FOLD Line aligned with the Wall Corner on the back of a Closet. It takes firm , even pressure to crease the Coroplast Plastic Board (I had to use my other hand to press the camera button, this photo was taken after the crease was made):
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0906.jpg

10) Fold the Pannier into its proper shape, and tack it with a piece of packing tape. Then drill holes, and start threading in some Nylon Zip-Ties. You may wish to substitute Pop-Rivets with washers. I prefer Zip-Ties as I can make an emergency repair on the road. If you carry a Pop-Rivet Tool on your Bicycle for emergency repairs, do your own thing:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0907.jpg

11) A third-hand Brake Cable Tool is useful for tightening the Zip-Ties:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0909.jpg

12) Left Side Pannier is done:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0910.jpg

13) Both Pannier Sides are done, assemblage is upside-down on the floor:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0911.jpg

14) Old Panniers on the Left, New Panniers on the right. The new Panniers are about twice the cubic volume, although two inches narrower overall. The old were 7 inches deep, the new are 12 inches deep. The old were 14 inches long, the new are 18 inches long:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0912.jpg

15) Test Fitting. I was inspired by TWO things- A motorcycle I saw last night, and a recent thread about a heel-clearance problem with rear panniers (here at bikeforums dot net). The SLANT allows for heel clearance, even with the panniers all the way forward on the rack:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0913.jpg

16) The Mounting Bolts are inserted from underneath, and large fender washers were used, to protect the Coroplast (tm) Corrugated Plastic:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0914.jpg

17) THE END:
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0916.jpg

I hope you have found this How-To Guide Useful. I wanted to say at the beginning that the set of Panniers would be made from a SINGLE SHEET of Plastic, using a method like Origami, or building a Paper-Airplane.

There are other photos at my web page, which didn't get selected for use in this How-TO Guide, if you feel like looking at them:
http://s134.photobucket.com/albums/q119/hotbike/

hotbike 08-07-11 06:08 PM

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0922.jpg
One more photo, as I forgot to give a good side view.
Hey, did you know you can write on black Coroplast with chalk, just like a blackboard?

coldfeet 08-08-11 10:44 AM

This is the first of your designs that haven't struck me as unbearably ugly. It looks quite reasonable, it also looks fairly conventional, it also looks like it could be ridden fairly easily.

Comments, the front box is very large, and if filled with heavy stuff is probably going to make the steering cumbersome. Of course, being coroplast, it probably can't take very heavy stuff anyway, good for flowers and similar light /bulky things. The bottle cages are a good idea, but if you have room, put them on the rear outer edges? Less sticking out to catch.

hotbike 08-08-11 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coldfeet (Post 13051867)
This is the first of your designs that haven't struck me as unbearably ugly. It looks quite reasonable, it also looks fairly conventional, it also looks like it could be ridden fairly easily.

Comments, the front box is very large, and if filled with heavy stuff is probably going to make the steering cumbersome. Of course, being coroplast, it probably can't take very heavy stuff anyway, good for flowers and similar light /bulky things. The bottle cages are a good idea, but if you have room, put them on the rear outer edges? Less sticking out to catch.

Thanks for those kind words. I had to write down the acronym K.I.S.S. , to remind myself to keep it simple. Your comment hit the mark- the front box can NOT hold a great weight. But it does handle bulky items. I used this bike to carry plastic grocery bags back to the supermarket for recycling, just two weeks ago. Some of those bags had "Happy Holidays" printed on them, so it was like a six month accumulation (December thru July). But ALL the bags were stuffed into the front box and the (old) panniers. Lightweight, but bulky.

As for your suggestion of mounting the bottle cages on the rear outer edges of the box, maybe I'd better show another picture (which I shot in May of 2010, right after building the box):
http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/IMG_0131.jpg
You see there is no room i that location? The box is right up against the handlebars. I have thought about moving the bottle cages to the Inside, Side edges, for better aerodynamics and to avoid snagging on things. But that would take away inside cubic volume.

I have started carrying a half gallon jug of refrigerator chilled water in the left rear pannier. The new panniers are 12 inches deep, versus seven inches for the old. So the center of gravity is lower. Now I've looked it over, and the thought came to me, "why not make the panniers even deeper?", but then I realized I need room to get to the axle QR if I need to change a tire.

This morning , I was thinking about my past attempts to build a Velomobile. I am now considering using Coroplast the whole way, making a boxy Velomobile, rather than streamlined. I think it would come-out looking more like a Jeep than a car. You remember the old Jeeps, with the canvas tops, and canvas doors? I think that would be more practical. The main purpose of such a vehicle would be riding in rain or cold weather, perhaps to get groceries , or go to the Library. No one wants to race me. I'm too old to race anyway. I don't want to do any more *stuff* strictly for aerodynamics.

In that last side-view photo, you might have noticed, I added another strip of coroplast on the top side edges of the rear panniers. I did this for stiffness, so when loaded, the sides will resist bowing out. I also wrote something in chalk on the sides- did you know that black coroplast makes a great blackboard? I can erase it whenever I want. Also, I'm going to leave the blue masking tape in place for a while.
I'm starting to ramble. Just look at the photo and you will see there is no room to put the bottle cages where you suggested.

hotbike 07-02-12 10:11 AM

I want you to see these new videos. I had to replace the supports under my Coroplast Aerodynamic Spoiler Basket, as the tire was rubbing the bottom of the basket. I used aircraft plywood and five layers of fiberglass to bond and support the structure. The thing is, the new supports can also support lower Cg Panniers on either side.



squirtdad 07-02-12 12:58 PM

Hot Bike, my hat is off to you....as always leading edge design and materials.

hotbike 07-03-12 10:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by squirtdad (Post 14432113)
Hot Bike, my hat is off to you....as always leading edge design and materials.

Thank you. I always post updates on the current status of my prototypes. I want this thread to be a valuable resource for the do-it-yourselfer.

A couple of notes about the materials; 1) Coroplast tm is a lot cheaper than Fiberglass. Coroplast comes in the form of boards, and can be folded. Whereas Fiberglass arrives in a liquid state, and requires a mold, and the mold costs as much as the finished Fairing.
2) Aircraft Plywood is much better than regular everyday lumberyard Plywood. More layers (thiner layers) and waterproof glue holding the plies together. I learnt my lesson from the Type 6 Velomobile, which was ruined after sitting outside for a couple of years, and the 1/4 inch "Luan" plywood (in the bulkheads) rotted out.

I want to note that the fiberglass on the fork, in the above video, has the first two layers wrapped around the fork blade, and joined together on the inside (the side facing the wheel) Then the next three layers wrap around the plywood on the outside, thus "sandwiching" the plywood. I want to pass this tip along as I doubt the structure would hold together otherwise.

This had to be done on account the Coroplast was bowing outwards and the tire was rubbing the bottom of the spoiler/basket. I saved a lot of money by not buying a touring fork.

For information about the 12 volt lighting system, click on the following link:
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...adlights/page2

In this case, I used Foam Board, like Poster board, from a local Office Supply store, instead of plywood or coroplast.

hotbike 04-29-13 09:47 AM

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...ps89b71a0e.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...ps90820eab.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...ps47eaa982.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...psdf16518e.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...pse133ff3c.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...psdc9e3ef2.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...ps7c0a300e.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...psde12d390.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...ps54532649.jpg

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...pse80ff439.jpg

Latest Photographs . The orange front panniers are new. The flags are also new. I came up with a method of carrying a spare tire. I have two spare tubes in the right rear pannier, and I had an old tire, which was replaced because it was half worn down, but it had no punctures. So I have a spare tire, hanging , zip-tied, on a piece of cardboard.

wahoonc 04-29-13 11:50 AM

I would "figure 8" the tire to reduce side loads from wind. But other than that...roll on!

Aaron :)

squirtdad 04-29-13 02:47 PM

Hotbike....how is it you keep improving? From from your original elegant and creative engineering to now the coordinated use of color and accessories? I think the New York fashion houses should use you for color consulting.

hotbike 08-31-13 01:22 PM


This is an Update on the Type Eleven, which will henceforth officially be known as Type 11 B (Eleven "Bravo").

This Bike is now a Real Utility Bike, as the cargo carrier is mounted to the Head Tube, without relying on the Handlebars or Fork.

It is configured like a Hand Truck , and should be able to cary any box weighing up to 70 pounds.

Any of the three Fairings can be placed on the Loading Platform. Quarter /Twenty Bolts or Bungee Cords? Hardware is simplified, Fairing can be changed out quickly. Electrical connection for the Headlights and Markers are the major complication.

hotbike 08-31-13 01:23 PM


hotbike 09-01-13 10:15 AM

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7360/9...e1c2c545ac.jpg
DSCF0948 by AviationMetalSmith, on Flickr

hotbike 09-01-13 10:28 AM

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7362/9...d938a1bb8a.jpg
DSCF0949 by AviationMetalSmith, on Flickr

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5443/9...9b5a6ddc51.jpg
DSCF0955 by AviationMetalSmith, on Flickr

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7453/9...86c3b2a43a.jpg
DSCF0952 by AviationMetalSmith, on Flickr

Some new pictures. 4 mile test ride went fine. Does Not shake , rattle... but it does roll.

One minor glitch, the Fairing, which is 12 inches wide and 16 inches long, is now too long for the bike to fit in the elevator of my building. I can make a new Fairing with the Coroplast on hand, or I could make a 12 inch cube , which would be non-aerodynamic, or a 10 inch cube. I consider the camera mount to be fairly important.
Or I could saw off the nose of the existing Fairing, and patch the hole with more Coroplast.
Or I could lift the bike and roll it on it's rear wheel, placing it in the elevator vertically. Or I could move to the cottage where I was living before, but it is too small, only 480 sq. feet. (This apt. is 720 sq. feet).

Or I could saw-off a few inches from the tail end of the rear Panniers! Or I could swop rear Panniers with this and another bike.

wphamilton 09-01-13 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hotbike (Post 16019741)
...

Or I could saw-off a few inches from the tail end of the rear Panniers!
Or I could swop rear Panniers with this and another bike.

That would be my choice, chop it just back of the rear wheel. Although the extra length is nice for a couple of reasons, those several inches seem to make a big difference. Since this is now coroplast you could extend the panniers upwards aka tailbox if you need more cargo space.

hotbike 09-01-13 11:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wphamilton (Post 16019863)
That would be my choice, chop it just back of the rear wheel. Although the extra length is nice for a couple of reasons, those several inches seem to make a big difference. Since this is now coroplast you could extend the panniers upwards aka tailbox if you need more cargo space.

I'll count your comment as a vote, "reduce length of Panniers from 24 to 20 inches".

hotbike 09-02-13 10:13 AM

Okay, it fits in the Elevator, and I didn't have to lop off either end. I figured out that the rear bulkhead of the Fairing was 3/4" thick (3 layers of Coroplast), and the new fiberglass bulkhead is 2.25" thick, which adds up to three inches...
So I cut a slot in the bottom rear of the Fairing, horizontally, and another slot in the rear vertically, and dropped the Fairing OVER the fiberglass rear bulkhead, and it looks very neat. Sorry, no pictures today, but I will post more pics.

The top rear edge of the Coroplast Fairing was also cut down to ten inches, so as to leave clearance for the handlebars. I have yet to re-install the Horn... The white LED Light-Strip had to be moved forward about two inches.

And a new Tripod was installed; a very compact Tripod , which is only ten inches high when the legs are retracted.

The actual mounting hardware is two quarter inch by one inch bolts, with Fender Washers, in the bottom.

More photographs are coming, stay tuned.


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