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Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

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Old 12-14-10, 10:30 AM   #1
crankers
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Bowery Lane Bicycles - Have you ridden one?

I've heard a lot of chatter both for and against these bikes, but I have not heard one peep in any review online from someone who's actually ridden one.

If you have, I want to know how you liked it, how does it stack up as a practical city bike? No speculation. If you have ridden other Worksman-made bikes feel free to share that experience also.
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Old 12-14-10, 01:24 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by crankers View Post
. If you have ridden other Worksman-made bikes feel free to share that experience also.
I own a Worksman bike w/7speed hub & a Worksman PAV trike w/3 speed hub. The whole Worksman line is designed for work and long life in a harsh factory setting. I find both my Worksman are ideal for city/urban use carrying whatever loads I place on them. No Worksman is designed for racing since they are to heavy built for that.

That said, if you want a bike that will outlast you then buy a Worksman. If you want to race then look elsewhere.
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I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 12-14-10, 08:19 PM   #3
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Its a practical city bike. You might also look into the Batavus Bub. Even BD is looking at the city bike market and its not a just hybrid with fenders and a rack slapped on.

The classic city bike is the Raleigh Sports, the finest city/utility bike ever made, period.
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Old 12-16-10, 08:48 AM   #4
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Thanks. I've considered buying a used Raleigh on CL - my one hesitation is that I like to work on my bikes and dealing with whitworth threading seems like a hassle if I want or need to replace/modify stuff.

Otherwise this thread wouldn't be here and I'd already be on a Sports.
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Old 12-16-10, 12:44 PM   #5
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A Raleigh Sports' parts seldom need to be replaced. A good bike shop can strip the threads to 24 TPI British standard if they need to be replaced.

Fortunately the Sports was built to last.
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Old 12-16-10, 05:10 PM   #6
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Thanks. I've considered buying a used Raleigh on CL - my one hesitation is that I like to work on my bikes and dealing with whitworth threading seems like a hassle if I want or need to replace/modify stuff.

Otherwise this thread wouldn't be here and I'd already be on a Sports.
Many parts can be replaced, but I don't know why. I have a several Raleighs, my old faithful is a 38 year old Raleigh Sports Standard that has somewhere well past 30,000 miles on it and is still ticking along. It has currently been re-purposed as my beer bike.

I will be interested to see how many of the current crop of bikes are still rolling 25+ years from now.

Aaron

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"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
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"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
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Old 12-18-10, 03:09 PM   #7
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I will be interested to see how many of the current crop of bikes are still rolling 25+ years from now.

Aaron

Yes, I agree. The oldie goldies like your bike are steel whereas the frames today are Aluminum. I can just see vast piles of decayed corroded aluminum bikes now!!
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My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 12-19-10, 08:15 AM   #8
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Yes, I agree. The oldie goldies like your bike are steel whereas the frames today are Aluminum. I can just see vast piles of decayed corroded aluminum bikes now!!
Not if I get MY hands on them, they head straight to the recycling center...last time I took a bunch in they were averaging almost $10 a frame scrap value.

Aaron
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Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
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Old 03-05-12, 02:33 PM   #9
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I have a Bowery Lane bike and love it. It's not a light bike and is pretty simple, but I knew that going in (it's a steel frame) and I like that it's no tech.. On the plus side, it'll last forever. They have a new lighter model now- looks like a skinnier frame..

BTW- I don't think they use Worksman's factory anymore, I heard they wanted a better quality bike than what Worksman's could make. The two are not the same company as far as I know.
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