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Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

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Old 04-03-11, 08:14 AM   #1
hotbike
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Bullitt Cargo Bikes (Long John Style)

I saw a cargo bike last year, but I forgot the name of it. Today, the first nice day of real spring weather, I saw the bike again, and I asked the rider to stop so I could write the name down: "BULLITT".

http://www.larryvsharry.com

The web address was on the frame, but the factory is located in Copenhagen.
Here is an English version:

http://www.larryvsharry.com/english/

As many of you know, I prefer cargo platforms/boxes to be on the front of my bikes. Contrary to what many people believe, the front loaded cargo bikes are easy to steer. It is NOT like a handlebar basket, which swings side-to-side with momentum, making a bike difficult to steer, when heavily loaded.
I first rode a "Long John" bike in 1987, at the IHPVA'S International Human Powered Speed Championships. It rode wonderfully well, with it's long wheelbase, although a screw shook loose while riding across some railroad tracks, and the (large) kickstand fell off. (I'm sorry about that).

Anyway, I'm thinking about buying a Bullitt Cargo Bike. Apparently, they do ship to the United States.

How many of these bikes have been imported? Does anyone here have one?
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Old 04-03-11, 10:48 AM   #2
John Lesar
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http://www.calhouncycle.com/
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Old 04-03-11, 11:04 AM   #3
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there's a crap ton of them in Portland

Look up Splendid Cycles. They have a whole showroom floor of them

R
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Originally Posted by hotbike View Post
I saw a cargo bike last year, but I forgot the name of it. Today, the first nice day of real spring weather, I saw the bike again, and I asked the rider to stop so I could write the name down: "BULLITT".

http://www.larryvsharry.com

The web address was on the frame, but the factory is located in Copenhagen.
Here is an English version:

http://www.larryvsharry.com/english/

As many of you know, I prefer cargo platforms/boxes to be on the front of my bikes. Contrary to what many people believe, the front loaded cargo bikes are easy to steer. It is NOT like a handlebar basket, which swings side-to-side with momentum, making a bike difficult to steer, when heavily loaded.
I first rode a "Long John" bike in 1987, at the IHPVA'S International Human Powered Speed Championships. It rode wonderfully well, with it's long wheelbase, although a screw shook loose while riding across some railroad tracks, and the (large) kickstand fell off. (I'm sorry about that).

Anyway, I'm thinking about buying a Bullitt Cargo Bike. Apparently, they do ship to the United States.

How many of these bikes have been imported? Does anyone here have one?
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Old 04-03-11, 09:24 PM   #4
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I just stopped by Splendid on my way to the bar today, they've got Orange, Blue, and Black in stock.
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Old 04-04-11, 12:12 PM   #5
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I rode one before I ended up getting my Cetma. I like the light weight and responsive handling, but I found that it was a little too harsh on potholes and rough pavement. I also really like to have a step through frame on a cargo bike. The LarryvsHarry is pretty speedy though.
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Old 04-04-11, 12:24 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by coldbike View Post
I rode one before I ended up getting my Cetma. I like the light weight and responsive handling, but I found that it was a little too harsh on potholes and rough pavement. I also really like to have a step through frame on a cargo bike. The LarryvsHarry is pretty speedy though.
Well, since you've ridden them both, was there anything else you didn't like about either one? And when you say speedy, do you think it would make a noticeable difference when riding it loaded? Also (last question, I promise) do you think fatter tires would have helped the Bullitt?
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Old 04-04-11, 01:06 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by coldbike View Post
I rode one before I ended up getting my Cetma. I like the light weight and responsive handling, but I found that it was a little too harsh on potholes and rough pavement. I also really like to have a step through frame on a cargo bike. The LarryvsHarry is pretty speedy though.
You busted my bubble now. I have to agree that a step through frame is important. Although the Bullitt frame looks a little more robust, and I would expect it to be a little "harsh" on potholes. Maybe the Cetma frame absorbs some of the harshness by being a little bit flexible?
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Old 04-04-11, 08:22 PM   #8
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I don't want to hijack the thread for CETMA, but I bought it based on the videos that Lane had posted at the time of his prototype bike.Yes, it has more vertical compliance than the LvsH and it does make the ride a little tamer. I didn't get to load the LvsH down as much as I regularly pack the CETMA. A load does tend to make the front end on all long john type bikes a lot less skittish.
I think fatter tires would help on the Bullit but I did not check what the clearance was. The CETMA has so much room for tires that I could probably fit my snow bike tires (3.8 inch) in it.
The deal maker for me was the huge load capacity and versatility of the CETMA. In hindsight, the CETMA has the best kickstand, the best balance of loaded/unloaded/high-speed/low-speed handling and a strong frame that I can still step through. I think the new margo shows promise as a lighter and faster version of the same.
I rode a bakfiets for nine months and I really liked it even though it was slower and heavier than my CETMA. I bought the CETMA based on the better hill climbing and better brake options.
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Old 04-05-11, 11:43 AM   #9
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.... A load does tend to make the front end on all long john type bikes a lot less skittish.
...
I am glad you said that. That is a fact. I have experienced the same phenomenon with our home built Type 9 and Type 10. With the Type 9, I often rode with about 35 pounds of sand in the front fairing, because that's what gave it the best handling. The Type 10 does not have an enclosure, but a flat platform, and I have two lead-acid batteries on it.
It makes me a lot more confident to have cargo on the front of a bike, especially when I'm riding in the "door zone". Motorists who have right-hooked me have paid for it.
I think the head tube angle is important, and the extra weight works good with a shallow head tube angle, to self-center the fork and front wheel. This is why I love front loading cargo bikes in general.
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Old 05-08-13, 10:35 AM   #10
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Yea, got video of a Bullitt in my neighborhood. That makes two now. This one is orange, the other is green.
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