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  1. #1
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    Question New here, introduction and questions

    Hi folks,
    I'm new here and new to utility cycling, so new in fact that I haven't actually even picked up my bike yet (6 days until that baby comes home with me!). Anyway, I'm getting a Yuba Mundo and I'm really stoked about it! I do however have a few questions and was hoping for some advice.

    1. I live in a community surrounded by goat heads and I really don't want to be fixing flats on every trip. Are the Mundo tires pretty tough on thorns or am I going to need a little help? Whats an inexpensive way to fix the problem?
    2. I will be cycling with my 20 month old and the thought of fixing a flat while keeping an eye on the toddler kind of stresses me out. Anyone have any insight or a tip on dealing with that? I get the feeling tethering him to a nearby fence or street sign might be frowned upon.
    3. I won't be leaving my bike out at night but whats a decent but not too expensive lock? Do I really have to spend close to a hundred bucks on this?
    4. The baby seat that specifically is sold by Yuba is not in stock until the end of feb, what are the alternative seats if any that would work with the mundo?

    Ok, I think that's it for now. Thank you!!

  2. #2
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    I don't own a Yuba, but I just read a review in this forum. You should check it out.

    1.No: You may want to check out big apple tires. If you can't get them yet. I've used platic strips that go between the tire and innertube.

    2. no clue

    3. Get a good u lock (bulldog?) and a good cable lock. Use them both. Someone that wants to steal your bike will need two different types of tools to steal it.

    4. I don't know, but the ones for the xtracycle might work. Hopefully someone else will chime in.

    Welcome by the way.

  3. #3
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    Thank you Jankdc looking up tires now!

  4. #4
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    Albuquerque is about as bad as it gets for goatheads. I ordered some big apples for my Mundo this morning. I am also going to try the flybikes cobra tubes, which allow changing a tube without removing the wheel.
    Cars made me fat. Now cars want to make me flat.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
    Albuquerque is about as bad as it gets for goatheads. I ordered some big apples for my Mundo this morning. I am also going to try the flybikes cobra tubes, which allow changing a tube without removing the wheel.
    Those cobra tubes are pretty slick. I'm impressed.

  6. #6
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    what do you guys think is the cheapest option for thorn protection...seriously every penny counts for me Thanks

  7. #7
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    I used to bike in New Mexico and there were goatheads everywhere. I used tire liners/puncture strips/aka tube protectors. They were less than $10 for a two pack. They worked well enough, I needed to periodically pull the thorns out of the tires and if one got the sidewall, I'd still get a flat.

    Mr. Tuffy is one brand, Stop flats is another. I'd go to your local lbs and see what they have.

    Quote Originally Posted by Youaintgotjack View Post
    what do you guys think is the cheapest option for thorn protection...seriously every penny counts for me Thanks

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jankdc View Post
    I used to bike in New Mexico and there were goatheads everywhere. I used tire liners/puncture strips/aka tube protectors. They were less than $10 for a two pack. They worked well enough, I needed to periodically pull the thorns out of the tires and if one got the sidewall, I'd still get a flat.

    Mr. Tuffy is one brand, Stop flats is another. I'd go to your local lbs and see what they have.
    Slime and Panaracer also has some.

  9. #9
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    Awesome - thank you - that's a fix I can afford lol

  10. #10
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    Changing tires on the Yuba is a pain. Especially the back one. Which is the only one that ever goes flat.

    When I bought my bike last summer, I had horrible luck with flats. The original tube went flat, I found a gash on the inside but nothing on the rim that seemed suspicious. I added a NOS tire liner that was in my garage. I think it was Slime brand. I could not get the tire to seat with a new tube. The bead would not seat all the way around. I tried seating it four times, gave up and went to the LBS. The mechanic really struggled with it. I think he tried three times before it seated. Yay! Tire popped in my hand before I got out of the store! So the mechanic had to start again with a new tire. Re-lined the rim, installed new tube with tire liner, struggled a lot and success I was out the door.

    One week later, I stop at a garage sale. When I get back on the bike, the rear tire is completely flat. WTF? Get it back home, take it apart, look for leaks and find nothing. The tube doesn't even blow bubbles in water. I find nothing stuck in the tire or rim. OK, get another new tube and here we go again. Struggle to get the tire seated. For whatever reason, the tire needs lube like WD-40 to seat. Lube and lots of working this way and that way. I have not had a flat since.

    The moral of the story is you do not want to change flats on the Yuba. You have to remove the go-getters to get to brakes and axle nuts, not to mention being able to maneuver the wheel out and in. The bike is heavy which does not make it easy to get the wheel in and lined up for you to tighten the axle nuts. You can get the wheel out with the bike standing on the tail, but you'll notice the bike moves a little once you loosen the axle nuts. So you can't get the wheel all the way home when the bike is on the tail which means you have to get it sort of aligned, then get the bike on the ground without letting the wheel fall out. None of this is any fun on the side of the road with a 20 month old. It really wasn't that fun in my garage.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ioverholt View Post
    Changing tires on the Yuba is a pain. Especially the back one. Which is the only one that ever goes flat.

    When I bought my bike last summer, I had horrible luck with flats. The original tube went flat, I found a gash on the inside but nothing on the rim that seemed suspicious. I added a NOS tire liner that was in my garage. I think it was Slime brand. I could not get the tire to seat with a new tube. The bead would not seat all the way around. I tried seating it four times, gave up and went to the LBS. The mechanic really struggled with it. I think he tried three times before it seated. Yay! Tire popped in my hand before I got out of the store! So the mechanic had to start again with a new tire. Re-lined the rim, installed new tube with tire liner, struggled a lot and success I was out the door.

    One week later, I stop at a garage sale. When I get back on the bike, the rear tire is completely flat. WTF? Get it back home, take it apart, look for leaks and find nothing. The tube doesn't even blow bubbles in water. I find nothing stuck in the tire or rim. OK, get another new tube and here we go again. Struggle to get the tire seated. For whatever reason, the tire needs lube like WD-40 to seat. Lube and lots of working this way and that way. I have not had a flat since.

    The moral of the story is you do not want to change flats on the Yuba. You have to remove the go-getters to get to brakes and axle nuts, not to mention being able to maneuver the wheel out and in. The bike is heavy which does not make it easy to get the wheel in and lined up for you to tighten the axle nuts. You can get the wheel out with the bike standing on the tail, but you'll notice the bike moves a little once you loosen the axle nuts. So you can't get the wheel all the way home when the bike is on the tail which means you have to get it sort of aligned, then get the bike on the ground without letting the wheel fall out. None of this is any fun on the side of the road with a 20 month old. It really wasn't that fun in my garage.

    Ok so this really makes me realize I need to have as much thorn protection as possible, i mean my sister sold her bike just few months ago because she said she got a flat every single time she went out and just couldn't take it any longer....I seriously can't get flats like that!

  12. #12
    Senior Member nubcake's Avatar
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    Welcome, I hate flats just as much as everyone so on my Xtracycle where I could care less about saving weight I am running Big Apple tires (which I love) with Mr Tuffy tire liners, no flats yet and we have a good deal of goat heads and broken glass here.

    With that being said once I take off my winter tires (just old mtb tires) I plan on putting some of the very thick "thorn resistant" tubes as well filled with flat attack tire sealant. I am sure this combo will make my mountain bike feel like a carbon wonder bike when I switch back.

    As to dealing with changing flats with a toddler, luckily I have not had to deal with that yet but I use a trailer so I can keep him strapped in there and just hand him a few toys to play with. I would rather see someone strap their kid to a tree than let them run around un-supervised where there might be cars or people flying by on bicycles.

    For the lock thing, most of the big guys (on guard, kryptonite, abus) make decent U-locks, just try to avoid the ones with a circular key, most of them can be picked into with a bic pen (search youtube if currious)
    Follow me as I prepare for the 2010, wait no 2012, maybe 2013 Tour Divide, ahh hell I will do it one day...
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  13. #13
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    IME, Slime sealer and thorn resistant tubes will slow goathead leaks down enough to get by with...at least at MTB/cruiser tire pressure. You will still need to pump up your tires every few days though.

    The Mundo has plenty of space to carry a floor pump if you can't afford a frame pump at this time. Actually, most of the frame pumps on the market are pretty sad affairs, IMO. I once had a Mt. Zefal that worked really well. Some thief got it.

    Actually, I run 60F/80R psi on my commuter, and regular tubes with slime, and it seals the pinholes that goatheads leave OK, IF I can resist pulling them out when I stop. About once every couple weeks, though, something will make about a 1/8" slit in the tire. I think it is glass shards maybe...never stays in the tire. The slime will seal that in about 20', then let go again about 50' later. Basically it only allows me to choose a nicer spot to stop and fix it. When I fix those, I usually find 1-3 goathead pinholes as well. My commuter is an IGH, so painful to pull the rear wheel on that, and yes, it seems that about 90% of the time it is the rear wheel that flats rather than the front.

    If you use slime, carry some alcohol wipes to clean it off the tube, or the patches won't stick right. Also, the "no glue" patches are temporary at best. All the time is spent taking the tube out and replacing it anyway, so it only takes about 5 more minutes to do a proper job ONCE, with glue and a Rema patch...but I carry a couple of the sticker patches just in case my tube of glue is dried up when I need it.

    I carry some ropes for securing the load, and have used that a couple of times to suspend the frame from a street sign pole as an improvised work stand. Standing the bike on the seat and bars tears up your seat, hand-grips, and bar candy.

    It IS possible to patch a tube with the wheel still on the bike: Not real easy though, and I find that I am not patient enough to make a good job of it but about 75% of the time. The hardest part is trying to find the object in the tire that caused the leak. Standing the Mundo on it's butt might make that easier.

    Another thing you can do is leave a spare tube inside the rear triangle, tied up to the left stays (rack on the Mundo) so it doesn't drag on the wheel, brakes, etc. Looks like heck though, and you still have to find the thorn or whatever in the tire.

    As I said, I am going to try the Cobra tubes and see how that works. I saw a mechanic putting one in a share-bike when I was in Paris, and it was a forehead slapping moment. Took a lot of googling to track them down, as I didn't know what they were called. Too bad they don't come in 700C sizes, but maybe they don't work so well with skinny tires. They are $11 at Universal bikes.

    If you are trying to save some money, check the bike isle at Target. They seem to be have stuff on clearance frequently. Last weekend I picked up a seat wedge bag for cheap, (I forget the price) and a LED headlight for $5. Not a great light to see by, but a pretty good "be seen" item. They also had patch kits for $1.48. It had the "no glue" patches I don't like, but came with a serviceable set of tire levers.
    Last edited by kevbo; 01-17-12 at 09:52 AM.
    Cars made me fat. Now cars want to make me flat.

  14. #14
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    Once again my sense of admiration for the biking community just GROWS! Thank you nubcake and kevbo! I love my bike shop but they seem always rushed and almost faithless in my ability to go without a car. Explaining all the little details is not their forte and I'm one of those people who likes to scrutinize and research all my options. ESPECIALLY because money is tight, I have to make the right choices. Thanks again!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
    As I said, I am going to try the Cobra tubes and see how that works. I saw a mechanic putting one in a share-bike when I was in Paris, and it was a forehead slapping moment. Took a lot of googling to track them down, as I didn't know what they were called. Too bad they don't come in 700C sizes, but maybe they don't work so well with skinny tires. They are $11 at Universal bikes.

    just looked them up- seriously genius!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
    Albuquerque is about as bad as it gets for goatheads. I ordered some big apples for my Mundo this morning. I am also going to try the flybikes cobra tubes, which allow changing a tube without removing the wheel.
    I am re-animating this zomby thread for an update: the big apple tires have greatly reduced flats, but the odd thorn still sneaks into the tube.

    The Cobra tubes make swapping in a tube fairly painless, but you still have to locate and remove the offending thorn from the tire.

    That said, I can't recommend the cobra tubes. I have had thee fail at the end joint after 3-800 miles. Patches are iffy at this location. I have tried binding the end with thread, but the tube tore at the edge of the thread after about 150 miles. I am a Clyde and have been running the 2" big apples at 45/55psi F/R.

    When the first two failed I thought perhaps it was the slime I had installed, maybe the fibre in the slime wedging into the end seam and stressing it, so I installed replacement tube dry, and now one of this has suffered an identical failure: tiny slit , about 1/8" right at the seam
    Cars made me fat. Now cars want to make me flat.

  17. #17
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    As far as the tire puncture issues are concerned. I personally on my Yuba am running 26 inch size "Bontrager Hard Case Ultimate" tires in their H# or LT# series tires with "Stop Flats 2" liners and then Slime brand 5x tough extra thick pre-slime-filled tubes.

    Triple layers of protection, I ride through anything and everything including but not limited too:
    ----- highway shoulder edges littered with broken bottle glass and other sharps
    ----- giant chuck holes and drain grates and over sharp curve edges that normally could cause snakebite pinch flats
    ----- through sharp flint rock outcroppings
    ----- through and over prickly pear cactus patches
    ----- through assorted non-specific thistle and thorn bush patches
    ----- and yes the occasional goat head thorns

    I rarely if ever have to fix a flat and even if I actually do get a puncture, provided I only pump the tire back up to 40-psi or so and not more the slime will slow down the leak enough to get me where I'm going and back again so I can fix it in the comfort of my own shop.

    I like Hookworm and Big Apple tires as well along with a few others. But be aware that not all puncture resistant tires are created equal, way too many of them have only a very narrow strip of puncture protection down their very middle and no side-wall protection whatsoever or even bottom edge of the tread protection. That is what makes the Hookworms and Big Apple tires a better choice even though they are not technically a design specific puncture resistant tire. Since they have a bead to bead wrap around tread pattern without conventional thin and weak sidewalls to them you get extra side wall protection beyond a normal tire. The "Bontrager Hard Case Ultimate" series of tires and a few other brands series of puncture resistant tires have wrap around full puncture resistance from bead to bead protecting the sidewall from punctures as well. BUT MOST SO CALLED PUNCTURE RESISTANT TIRES DO NOT !!! They only have puncture protection on the bottom of the tread in a narrow strip down the middle, I find that insufficient at best. I'll take a hookworm or a big apple even though not technically a puncture resistant tire over one of them any day, but even better is a true puncture resistant tire with full wrap around protection.

  18. #18
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    1) I have Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires on both my commute bike and my utility bike - between the two bikes I have 25,000 miles and 2 flats.
    2) Teach the toddler to change tubes . If you have good tires, you probably won't ever get to watch Jr changing a tire.
    3) Personal preference, but for heavy bikes (and all my bikes are heavy), I like frame locks like the ABUS with an attaching chain. Easy to carry, always there,
    4) Can't help you on that - I'm a trailer guy, and my trailer converts between cargo and kid modes.

  19. #19
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    I swear by Mr. Tuffy. They are in every bike at this house. Ok, sidewalls are still at risk. But, the main tread area is heavily armored. Worth every penny.

  20. #20
    Senior Member rdlange's Avatar
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    not the original poster but this thread has been very helpful. thanks all.

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