Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-05-12, 11:28 AM   #1
Youaintgotjack
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Bikes: Yuba Mundo (sold), Yuba Boda Boda (sold), now I ride a batavus Personal Delivery Bike
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My first flat on my Yuba Mundo- of course its the rear one!

I decided to take it into the LBS because it's due for a tune up anyway (my free one after purchase) and I need to try to avoid this from recurring as much as possible- therefore its time for some thorn proof liners and tubes.

I've heard about different tires that might be helpful for an area with goatheads- what would you folks recommend for someone on a budget? I have to avoid flats as much as possible because I can't fix them roadside with the toddler on the back- too dangerous. Can anyone recommend a website too for inexpensive tires or am I generally best going though my LBS?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bike ride 007.jpg (100.9 KB, 26 views)
Youaintgotjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 01:29 PM   #2
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Bikes:
Posts: 6,222
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 148 Post(s)
What size tires does your bike use?

In addition to tires with a Kevlar belt, two other anti-goathead measures are tire liners and putting some sealant (like Slime) inside the tubes. Sounds like you're already planning on adding liners.
prathmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 02:11 PM   #3
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 22,043
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1096 Post(s)
Thorn Resistant inner tubes.. 2x the price but 4x the rubber.
Schwalbe marathon plus tires
put the tire liner stuff under the tread , outside of the casing
inside the tire the overlap of the strip liner
moves with every rotation, and so will eventually make a hole in the tube.
fietsbob is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 02:24 PM   #4
Youaintgotjack
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Bikes: Yuba Mundo (sold), Yuba Boda Boda (sold), now I ride a batavus Personal Delivery Bike
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
What size tires does your bike use?

In addition to tires with a Kevlar belt, two other anti-goathead measures are tire liners and putting some sealant (like Slime) inside the tubes. Sounds like you're already planning on adding liners.
They are 26x2.00 tires.. thanks
Youaintgotjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 02:24 PM   #5
Youaintgotjack
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Bikes: Yuba Mundo (sold), Yuba Boda Boda (sold), now I ride a batavus Personal Delivery Bike
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Thorn Resistant inner tubes.. 2x the price but 4x the rubber.
Schwalbe marathon plus tires
put the tire liner stuff under the tread , outside of the casing
inside the tire the overlap of the strip liner
moves with every rotation, and so will eventually make a hole in the tube.
good tip- thank you!
Youaintgotjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 03:08 PM   #6
kevbo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 322
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When buying thorn resistant tubes, be sure your tires are at the low end of the size range. The tubes are only thick on the outside, so all the stretch happens on the inside. I have had a new tube split when the tire was the max size it was spec'd for.
kevbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 03:10 PM   #7
bendembroski
My legs hurt
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Farther behind you than I'd like to be
Bikes: Vaya, Brompton, '73 Schwinn Super Sport, Cresswell Fold-it, '81 Trek 610
Posts: 683
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Aside from all the thorn proofing you can do. You might want to consider picking up a 'cobra tube'. http://www.amazon.com/Flybikes-Cobra.../dp/B005U5T8FS It's basically a temporary tube you can fit without having to remove the wheel. Nothing is puncture proof, and it's good to have a backup plan. These tubes might be workable with Jack on board. Just remember to swap it back to a regular tube when you get home.

Also, it's a good idea to practice in the back yard a few times so when it happens 'on the road' you won't have to think about what to do. You can just do it! I've done puncture repair with toddler twice now. It's not fun, but it is possible if you are really quick. Not having to wrestle the rear wheel off the bike helps hugely. As does letting the wee one work the pump
bendembroski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 04:03 PM   #8
Youaintgotjack
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Bikes: Yuba Mundo (sold), Yuba Boda Boda (sold), now I ride a batavus Personal Delivery Bike
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
thanks kevbo!!
Youaintgotjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 04:04 PM   #9
Youaintgotjack
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Bikes: Yuba Mundo (sold), Yuba Boda Boda (sold), now I ride a batavus Personal Delivery Bike
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bendembroski View Post
Aside from all the thorn proofing you can do. You might want to consider picking up a 'cobra tube'. http://www.amazon.com/Flybikes-Cobra.../dp/B005U5T8FS It's basically a temporary tube you can fit without having to remove the wheel. Nothing is puncture proof, and it's good to have a backup plan. These tubes might be workable with Jack on board. Just remember to swap it back to a regular tube when you get home.

Also, it's a good idea to practice in the back yard a few times so when it happens 'on the road' you won't have to think about what to do. You can just do it! I've done puncture repair with toddler twice now. It's not fun, but it is possible if you are really quick. Not having to wrestle the rear wheel off the bike helps hugely. As does letting the wee one work the pump
I had heard of those cobra tubes last time I asked about this and yesterday I was thinking about them lol. Couldn't remember what they were called. I obviously need to buy a pump too!
Youaintgotjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 06:13 PM   #10
kevbo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 322
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I get about 5-6 rear wheel flats per front one, seems to be true on cars, bikes, and motorcycles. One theory is that nails and such lie flat on the ground, but the front wheel gives them a spin/nudge and sometimes they end up standing on end just when the back wheels pass over.

Just before I broke the frame on my commuter/utility bike I put new Schwalbe Marathons on it. I fixed all the goathead pinholes before putting the old tubes back. I had 13 in the front, and 2 in the rear. The rear has many more total patches, as I would do the pinholes whenever I got a big hole the slime couldn't seal. The last one was only a few days earlier and convinced me to go for the $chwalbes. Seems like the goatheads are equal opportunity tire pokers, but the big stuff waits for the back tire. 13 pinholes in that front tire, and the slime still had it holding air pretty well (top it off weekly). No flats on the Schwalbes, but I only rode them less than two weeks before the frame gave out. Surly Cross Check frame is due tomorrow, so I can continue my tire test.

Lindsay, if you decide to try the flybike cobra tubes, ebikestop had the best price I could find. Also carry some rope, cord, zipties or old shoe lace, so you can tie the old tube up to the left side of the rack out of the way...you won't be able to remove it without cutting it, or pulling the wheel, so just tie it up and patch it when you get home. You can patch a tube without removing the wheel from the bike, but it isn't really much easier, IME.
kevbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 10:40 PM   #11
Youaintgotjack
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Bikes: Yuba Mundo (sold), Yuba Boda Boda (sold), now I ride a batavus Personal Delivery Bike
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
I get about 5-6 rear wheel flats per front one, seems to be true on cars, bikes, and motorcycles. One theory is that nails and such lie flat on the ground, but the front wheel gives them a spin/nudge and sometimes they end up standing on end just when the back wheels pass over.

Just before I broke the frame on my commuter/utility bike I put new Schwalbe Marathons on it. I fixed all the goathead pinholes before putting the old tubes back. I had 13 in the front, and 2 in the rear. The rear has many more total patches, as I would do the pinholes whenever I got a big hole the slime couldn't seal. The last one was only a few days earlier and convinced me to go for the $chwalbes. Seems like the goatheads are equal opportunity tire pokers, but the big stuff waits for the back tire. 13 pinholes in that front tire, and the slime still had it holding air pretty well (top it off weekly). No flats on the Schwalbes, but I only rode them less than two weeks before the frame gave out. Surly Cross Check frame is due tomorrow, so I can continue my tire test.

Lindsay, if you decide to try the flybike cobra tubes, ebikestop had the best price I could find. Also carry some rope, cord, zipties or old shoe lace, so you can tie the old tube up to the left side of the rack out of the way...you won't be able to remove it without cutting it, or pulling the wheel, so just tie it up and patch it when you get home. You can patch a tube without removing the wheel from the bike, but it isn't really much easier, IME.
Thank you Kevbo- always so much good info from you! cheers!
Youaintgotjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-12, 10:41 PM   #12
Ranko Kohime
Senior Member
 
Ranko Kohime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Bikes:
Posts: 108
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, I guess I'll be the first to suggest an airless tire.

Air Free Tires

There are probably other brands and places to buy them, if you look around.
Ranko Kohime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-12, 06:10 PM   #13
kevbo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 322
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I get about 5-6 rear wheel flats per front one, seems to be true on cars, bikes, and motorcycles. One theory is that nails and such lie flat on the ground, but the front wheel gives them a spin/nudge and sometimes they end up standing on end just when the back wheels pass over.

Just before I broke the frame on my commuter/utility bike I put new Schwalbe Marathons on it. I fixed all the goathead pinholes before putting the old tubes back. I had 13 in the front, and 2 in the rear. The rear has many more total patches, as I would do the pinholes whenever I got a big hole the slime couldn't seal. The last one was only a few days earlier and convinced me to go for the $chwalbes. Seems like the goatheads are equal opportunity tire pokers, but the big stuff waits for the back tire. 13 pinholes in that front tire, and the slime still had it holding air pretty well (top it off weekly). No flats on the Schwalbes, but I only rode them less than two weeks before the frame gave out. Surly Cross Check frame is due tomorrow, so I can continue my tire test.

Lindsay, if you decide to try the flybike cobra tubes, ebikestop had the best price I could find. Also carry some rope, cord, zipties or old shoe lace, so you can tie the old tube up to the left side of the rack out of the way...you won't be able to remove it without cutting it, or pulling the wheel, so just tie it up and patch it when you get home. You can patch a tube without removing the wheel from the bike, but it isn't really much easier, IME.
kevbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 04:37 AM   #14
badmother
Senior Member
 
badmother's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 3,309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranko Kohime View Post
Well, I guess I'll be the first to suggest an airless tire.

Air Free Tires

There are probably other brands and places to buy them, if you look around.
Be careful, do not use the "air free" word! It is like swearing in church. Soon they are going to verbally beat you up for not watching your mouth. Hide while you can..
badmother is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 07:03 AM   #15
Suburban
Senior Member
 
Suburban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Suburb
Bikes:
Posts: 217
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What's wrong with airfree? I have zero interest in fixing flats and my LBS is quite the distance from my house. I thought it looked like a good idea. I can just imagine being stuck at the side of the road trying to keep 3 small children occupied while I change a flat. If I can bypass that, it sounds great.
Suburban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 07:59 AM   #16
bendembroski
My legs hurt
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Farther behind you than I'd like to be
Bikes: Vaya, Brompton, '73 Schwinn Super Sport, Cresswell Fold-it, '81 Trek 610
Posts: 683
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've never tried one so can't say firsthand, but I would think that the rolling resistance / ride quality on an 'air-free' would be pretty horrific.

Speaking from a position of total ignorance here.
bendembroski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 08:54 AM   #17
dcrowell
Fat Guy Rolling
 
dcrowell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Louisville Kentucky
Bikes: Bacchetta Agio, 80s Raleigh Record single-speed, Surly Big Dummy
Posts: 2,439
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Air free tires are harder, create more rolling resistance on real surfaces (as opposed to smooth "lab" surfaces), and give a harsh ride. Pneumatic (air-filled) tires were invented for a reason. Feel free to spend your money on them, but you'll probably switch back... or give up and quit riding.

The least-likely-to-flat setup you can ride is probably the Schwalbe Marathon Plus and Schwalbe tubes. It'll cost just a little more than airless tires. They're heavy, but that's not a huge issue on a cargo bike.

You really should carry a spare tube, patch kit, and pump. Learn to change a tube. It's not too hard. I understand the problems with several bored children to watch, but maybe they'll be impressed with "Mommy fixed the bike!"
dcrowell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 09:49 AM   #18
Ranko Kohime
Senior Member
 
Ranko Kohime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Bikes:
Posts: 108
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bendembroski View Post
I've never tried one so can't say firsthand, but I would think that the rolling resistance / ride quality on an 'air-free' would be pretty horrific.

Speaking from a position of total ignorance here.
I'm also speaking from a position of ignorance, (as I've yet to change the stock tires on my current loaner bike, and don't feel like changing them prior to buying whichever bike I finally do decide on), but the website I linked to touts someone using their tires to do amateur racing.
Ranko Kohime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 10:04 AM   #19
hubcap
One Man Fast Brick
 
hubcap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Bikes: Specialized Langster, Bianchi San Jose, early 90s GT Karakoram, Yuba Mundo, Mercier Nano (mini velo), Nashbar Steel Commuter, KHS Tandemania Sport
Posts: 1,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Setting yourself up with the right tires/tubes/liners to avoid flats is good planning. Not being prepared to fix a flat on your own is poor planning. If you have never repaired a flat tire on your bike, I recommend practicing it in a controlled environment (e.g. your garage, parking lot @ your apt., etc.).
hubcap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 10:10 AM   #20
Suburban
Senior Member
 
Suburban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Suburb
Bikes:
Posts: 217
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I used to do maintenance on my car for years. Oil changes, rotating tyres, spark plugs, minor repairs, changing brakes etc... I'm sure I can change a tyre. I just hate being put on the spot, hence I always drove newer vehicles so I wouldn't be stuck on the side of the road with a problem. It's one thing to do maintenance/repairs in a change of clothes on my driveway. It's different on the side of the road.

How often do you get flats? I think I'll go with pneumatic tyres, but if flats happen as often as it comes up on bikeforums, I might go airfree.
Suburban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 10:34 AM   #21
bendembroski
My legs hurt
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Farther behind you than I'd like to be
Bikes: Vaya, Brompton, '73 Schwinn Super Sport, Cresswell Fold-it, '81 Trek 610
Posts: 683
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It varies with road conditions, thorns, glass, etc. Also riding style (in the gutter with the rubbish, or further out in the 'clean' bit of the road, etc.

No thorns here, but plenty of broken glass (ahhhhh, Glasgow) I run Schwalbe Big Apples, which have a some kind of puncture protection, but not as tough as Marathon Pluses. I'm getting what I would guess about 3 flat a year on average, over the course of maybe 1000 miles a year. Interestingly, when I wasn't working from home I was riding about 3k a year and I had the same number flats... Go figure

Also, for those who are thinking about practicing fixing a flat. Do it at least once in the dark, preferably in the rain or snow. The process might be the same, but I find those conditions make fixing a flat an entirely different kettle of fish.
bendembroski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 11:07 AM   #22
hubcap
One Man Fast Brick
 
hubcap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Bikes: Specialized Langster, Bianchi San Jose, early 90s GT Karakoram, Yuba Mundo, Mercier Nano (mini velo), Nashbar Steel Commuter, KHS Tandemania Sport
Posts: 1,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban View Post
How often do you get flats? I think I'll go with pneumatic tyres, but if flats happen as often as it comes up on bikeforums, I might go airfree.
I only get flats two or three times each year. That is spreading about 10,000 miles per year over several bikes. I have never had one on my Yuba, but I am usually prepared for it if I do, which includes having the atypical wrench size to get the rear wheel off. I have schwalbe marathons on one bike and got my first flat in a few years on those tires this winter before the studded tires went on. Other bikes/tires are more problematic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bendembroski View Post
Also, for those who are thinking about practicing fixing a flat. Do it at least once in the dark, preferably in the rain or snow. The process might be the same, but I find those conditions make fixing a flat an entirely different kettle of fish.
Dark and/or rain doesn't affect me much. But trying to fix a flat when your fingers don't want to work right due to the cold is just not fun.
hubcap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 11:17 AM   #23
kevbo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 322
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This reads like a fairly objective review of one airless tire:

http://felixwong.com/2006/12/air-free-tires/

Be sure and read the embedded updates regarding poor customer service from one supplier.
kevbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 11:53 AM   #24
kevbo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 322
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban View Post
How often do you get flats? I think I'll go with pneumatic tyres, but if flats happen as often as it comes up on bikeforums, I might go airfree.
It seems to go in cycles. I can go months without a flat, and then have 3 in the same week. The last time that happened it was along the same 100' or so of road. There must of have been something evil spread along that stretch, but I never found anything in the tire, and couldn't see anything on the road either. Part of what you are reading is sample bias. Nobody wants to talk about not having flats for months on end for fear of jinxing themselves!
kevbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-12, 01:36 PM   #25
Youaintgotjack
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Bikes: Yuba Mundo (sold), Yuba Boda Boda (sold), now I ride a batavus Personal Delivery Bike
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think people underestimate having a 20 month old baby to watch while changing a flat is not by any means realistic, on the side of the road or in a garage for that matter. He is old enough to climb, push and run and not old enough to be trustworthy to listen to direction. I'm not on any superwoman quest to prove anything, even if I got a flat beside a play structure I still wouldn't let my child play unassisted because he thinks he can fly.

I don't have a double kickstand yet so removing the rear wheel on a yuba with a peanut seat is simply not easy, call it bad planning or whatever you will- I simply don't intend on fixing a rear flat on the side of the road EVER. Does that mean I'm going to have to walk, call a cab or possibly get stranded occasionally- YEP. Can I fix a flat, yes done it a hundred times, I could do that when I was 9.

All I really need is the least likely to get a flat option...and of course a patch kit, small tool kit and a pump with me at all times. As long as I know I've done all I can to avoid flats I'll be happy. I think checking tire pressure everyday or so will help too, pretty sure I got a pinch going over a bump.
Youaintgotjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:44 PM.