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Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

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Old 05-05-14, 12:22 PM   #1
fietsbob 
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FYI Cargo cycle design using modular construction

passing on a link .. LOW-TECH MAGAZINE: Modular Cargo Cycles
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Old 05-06-14, 06:37 AM   #2
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Thanks! Low Tech Magazine is always full of awesome.
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Old 05-06-14, 11:11 AM   #3
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With all the various fasteners being used to build a bike like this joint loosening is a BIG problem!!!
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Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 05-06-14, 07:40 PM   #4
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thread lock and nylok nuts FTW
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Old 05-06-14, 07:44 PM   #5
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Yeah they freely offer the plans for the recumbent models, but they're not sharing them for the cargo bike and trike. Bummer. I would love to build the cargo trike.
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Old 06-01-14, 07:17 AM   #6
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For a person without welding skills that might make a lot of good sense.

But for someone like me with welding skills all I see is the huge amount of unnecessary weight added by all those bolts, nuts, and washers. I would be willing to bet a 5-pound box of good quality 1/16" size E308-16 welding rods that with all the added weight of the bolts, nuts, and washers it increases the weight of the frame by over 50% compared to an identical frame made by welding the joints rather then using all those bolts, nuts, and washers. Granted welding adds a little weight beyond the bare weight of the tubing alone but not near as much as using bolts, nuts, and washers. Not to mention cost and strength issues, generally enough welding rod to do the job is going to run you less money then using bolts, nuts, and washers like that and if you do a good job with your welding it will be stronger then if you drilled through the tubes and connected them with bolts like that.

Plus if your do it like I generally do and use 304 stainless thin wall tubing with the E308-16 rod (or wire spool if your a MIGer) then you end up with a rust proof frame as well. Unless you buy stainless bolts and hardware ($$$) in time all those bolts are going to start rusting especially if you ride in winter where they use salt.

Last edited by turbo1889; 06-01-14 at 07:21 AM.
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Old 06-01-14, 07:35 AM   #7
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Modular idea using bolts to connect modules in and of itself isn't a bad one though.

I'm thinking a rear drive module with the main frame triangle and seat and rear wheel and then various front cargo modules that can be mixed and matched. Tadpole trike front end module with cargo basket between the front wheels. Short wheel base over the front wheel cargo rack module. Medium wheel base length front box bakfiets module. Long wheelbase low-boy extreme cargo hauler flat bed front module. Etc. . . .

And just use half dozen at most bolts with washers and nylon lock nuts to bolt on whatever front cargo module you needed to the main rear drive module. That could work out very nicely.
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