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Old 05-20-14, 04:23 PM   #1
1989Pre
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Carry Frameset on Bicycle?

I am going to pick up my frame at the powder-coaters, and want to bring it back the thirty miles on my other bike. I wanted to get some ideas on how others would do this. I'm going to put the forks in a backpack, but the frame, itself, I want to attach to my body.
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Old 05-20-14, 08:14 PM   #2
sk0tt
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Can you tie it to the backpack?
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Old 05-21-14, 07:23 AM   #3
unterhausen
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I assume you already did this, but as a framebuilder I have done this many times. Slinging it over my shoulder has been the way I've done it. It can put pressure on the collar bone, but it works. I always wanted to build a fixture to attach to my rack, but that's down on the list pretty far. I have mounted a frame sideways on a rack, and that works. Requires padding
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Old 05-21-14, 08:46 AM   #4
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A Yard sale kid trailer makes many hauling chores simpler ..
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Old 05-21-14, 10:21 AM   #5
Philphine
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I wonder, if the seat post was out far enough, if you could slip the seat post through the head tube. maybe with the frame upside down. then sitting on a rack, padded and strapped down as needed.
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Old 05-21-14, 06:43 PM   #6
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I have always put it side to side on a rack. No problems with most frames. You obviously have to put adequate padding. And it keeps people from passing you too closely as a side benefit
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Old 05-22-14, 03:34 AM   #7
semaler
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Front racks are great for this kind of stuff!

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Old 05-22-14, 04:27 AM   #8
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I've done both front and rear rack and over the shoulder for short rides, but the only thing I've found to be comfortable for long rides is zip-tied to ta backpack.
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Old 06-05-14, 07:39 PM   #9
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1989Pre, how did you do it? Did you manage to get it home safely?
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