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Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

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Old 03-06-03, 09:11 AM   #1
nikos
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The sad truth, there is nothing to prevent fogging of glasses/goggles!

Today I tossed my goggles into a field of snow. After trying KatKrap, soap, oil, some Yamaha anti-fog - nothing works. The treatments above, take the moisture and turn it into a thin layer of ice. With all the technology out there, I cant believe that this has to be. I can finally ride all year round, warm hands and feet, but a wide open face due to fog ups! This just sucks! Once the sweating starts, and facing a slow up hill climb - bring on the fog - it always happens....after trying every trick. Ill be pissed all day thinking about this.
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Old 03-06-03, 09:32 AM   #2
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I've got the same issues! I LIKE to ride when it's cold, I must almost always wear some form of lenses to keep debris out of my eyes because I wear gas permeable hard contact lenses. So - I ride without lenses and I'm always stopping due to stuff in my eyes, I ride with lenses and they fog up just as you indicate. Even riding at night - I still wear clear lenses.

I think I've finally found my solution - I just bought a new set of lenses from Performance and so far I've had pretty good experience with them! They are probably less than 20% as prone to fogging as the 10 or more other sets I've tried...and they're INEXPENSIVE!

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...263&Store=Bike

Look closely at the picture...there are a few key vent holes at the top of the lenses that do an incredible job of creating critical airflow to purge the hot steamy air from your eyes. They're NOT perfect...if you stop, you'll still have to pull them from your face - but they are a MAJOR improvement over anything else I've tried. They include a very nice hard case, a cleaning cloth and THREE sets of lenses (amber, grey and clear)...

Watch for the Performance sales...every other month or so it seems they'll sell all their glasses for CHEAP. I picked a set of these up a month ago for $29.99.
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Old 03-06-03, 12:46 PM   #3
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So try a helmet shield instead.....
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Old 03-07-03, 01:42 PM   #4
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So try a helmet shield instead.....
Do you know where you can find these?
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Old 03-07-03, 02:24 PM   #5
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www.nashbar.com
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Old 03-10-03, 07:47 AM   #6
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I gave up on googles this winter. I have used clear (slightly rose colored actually) wrap-around sunglasses. I get enough protection to keep the contacts from drying out and enough airflow to prevent fogging.

Sometimes when it is very cold (0F-10F) I get watery eyes until I warm up. This is really the only small problem I have with them though.
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Old 03-14-03, 10:12 PM   #7
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No! You can use cheap ($4) plastic visor goggles, the sort used in chemistry labs. They're vented, and they keep out the bitter cold, the snow, and the debris.

They don't fog up, either, as long as you remember to move them off of your eyes at stop signs.

Way better than expensive ski goggles, visors, or anything else. And cheaper than dirt.
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Old 03-17-03, 01:34 PM   #8
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Hi D*Alex,

That visor sure does look like a good option as i suffer from the same problem.

But will it still help with us who wear prescription glasses. They will still fog up. I tried contacts, ugggg! Hated em.

Nikos,

I am surprised the dish soap didn't work. I use it all the time, and other than the pain of having to apply it everyday, being carefull not to rub it off, and the slightly distorted vison, I find it the best solution. Hmmmm, perhaps you ride longer, create more water/sweat over time which will eventually freeze. I have never riden more than 20km in winter which may mean that I don't spend enough time to get the freezing problem. PLUS I don't ride when it is really cold.

Try that visor thing, IF you don't wear prescription glasses. Let us know how it goes please.

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Old 06-21-03, 06:43 AM   #9
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Try gel toothpaste on your glasses. The toothpaste CANNOT have any baking soda in it or it will scratch your lenses. With your finger rub a thin layer of gel tootpaste on both sides of your lenses. Then do a very light rinsing with a trickle of water. Do not immerse in water or use high pressue water or you'll blast all of the toothpaste off. Very gently pat off the excess water with a dish towel; do not rub it dry. You will now have glasses that you will look a little bit dirty but that are fog-resistant. I've gotten through two winter of daily cycling with this method....
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Old 06-21-03, 06:13 PM   #10
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I have had good success over the years by venting differently depending on the conditions. In deep snow at slow speed /high effort,I wear wrap around sunglasses.I pull them just a little off my face for a space at the top when needed.I wear a long loop to keep them hanging on when I have to take them off totally.On the road/higher speed,I put them close to my face and pull the balaklava tight against the glasses.Below about 15 degrees I wear goggles with adjustable vents at the top.I do sometimes get ice when going slow,working hard at that temp.But If I get a lot of iceing I go back to sunglasses.If the goggles get too icy I put them under my coat for a while.Sometimes I can hang them from the handle bars and they de ice.It depends on the temperature.Having the goggles and the sunglasses with me seems to eventually work no matter what happens.Experimenting at different temperatures seems to provide a solution eventually.I finally put a small thermometer on my stem.Now after many years of looking at the temperature I have learned how to dress and what eye protection I need for a given temperature,or condition.It did take a few years to get it exactly right.
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Old 06-26-03, 09:59 AM   #11
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I dont use them for riding but I find that oakley lenses do not fog
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Old 06-26-03, 02:49 PM   #12
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flat spray paint will also remove the fogging problem.
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Old 07-16-03, 08:38 AM   #13
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I will ask this question on the member forum at www.psia.org (Professional Ski Instructors' Association) andI will see if anyone has a better answer. I generally avoid fogging by moving, and have a terrible time if I stand around too long, especially when it is really warm, like 30 degrees F or more. I have less problem when it is cold. some of the double lens goggles have less problem, and I know of some goggles with motorized fans, which seem to work. One instructor I met swore by a product called "cat crap" which was some kind of soap or wax-like product, which apparently broke down the surface tension of water. Visit your local ski shop for more help.
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Old 07-16-03, 09:02 AM   #14
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Divers use their own spit to prevent their masks from fogging over when they dive down to the cooler temps. They spit in their masks spread it around with their fingers then rinse it with he water they are diving in. I hear it works well. May want to give it a try.
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Old 07-16-03, 12:19 PM   #15
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Spit works great for me when diving,so does cat crap and other anti fog products.The difference is that in diving there is not such a large temperature differential to cause as much and fast condensation.Not only is moisture coming from you,But,when the inside of the lens is close to 98.6 and the out side is 20 degrees,it just causes moisture on the lens.Like a single paine window in a house.And of course diving does not have an ice problem. Or, at least I don't in my very limited experience.

If you have some "croakies" or something to hold your glasses on like a leash that is adjustable,you can have a little space at the top when you pull them away to de-fog and pull the glasses close to you face when needed for cold.Leave just enough slack to let the goggle get about 1/2 inch away from your face and pull them out onto your nose a little when you stop or slow down.If you keep from getting too much fog then the ice is not a problem. I don't know if there is a better way,I'm used to this and I ride on the ice every winter.It has become natural for me.Part of the problem is finding something that you are comfortable with and getting used to it too.I have showed this to some friends, and some get it, some don't.

I used to have some double lens goggles(like storm windows for a house) for skiing but I lost them many years ago.does anyone have any recent first hand experience with double lens goggles?
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Old 07-22-03, 08:05 PM   #16
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Here is a cut and paste from the PSIA member forum:

In another forum, on winter bicycling, someone asked how to keep goggles from fogging, and I said I would seek opinions here. Please tell me if you don't want your opinion cut and pasted (without a name) to another forum. Please make your best suggestions for avoiding fogging, and feel free to suggest products, including goggles.

Posted - 21 July 2003 13:33:

Heat coming off the chest is a major contributing factor to winter lens fogging. With close fitting clothing, the heat streams up the neck and right into the lenses. "Turbo" type goggles with fans in them are the best single approach to attacking the fog problem after the fact, but a combination of fans, lens ventilation, and surface treatments can help. However, a more direct approach is to lighten up and loosen up. Delayer and/or unzip to let the heat disperse over a wider area. Your choice of hats/headgear can also make a big difference. You need to make a tradeoff between being cold when you are not active and fogging when you are.
Regards,

Posted - 18 July 2003 13:51:

well, I primarily use sunglasses too, but for a differnt reason. I have been told I have a hot head. I fog everything, and the only thing that has worked for me was Smith Turbos, and I was even able to fog them too.
However I have heard of people trying Rain-x anti fog and similar products (but they will just bead the water) with varied success stories.

Posted - 16 July 2003 13:57:

It hasn't ever really been a problem for me, as I use sunglasses primarily. I do own a pair of goggles, and I think what works is if they are doubled lensed. They have never fogged up on me, ever.
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Old 08-09-03, 09:26 PM   #17
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To avoid fogging up, I find the best solution is to keep my sweat away from my shades. I wear a Halo Headsweat. It is overpriced but works like a charm. Just did a big trip and could see where I was going pretty well all of the time.

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Old 12-25-03, 05:31 PM   #18
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Just don't wear any clothing on your face (like a balaclava, scarf, or whatever) - your face can take the cold if it's around the freezing point, or if it gets colder, smear a little Johnson's & Johnson's Daily Protection cream on it, and you'll be just fine.
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Old 01-08-04, 09:08 PM   #19
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Has anyone tried Rain-X anti fog? I was thinking of trying it but the package says it may damage some plastics. I always wear a pair of safety glasses and don't have much of a problem with fogging except when I wear a facemask when it is really cold (near 0° F).
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Old 01-08-04, 09:14 PM   #20
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Quote:
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Has anyone tried Rain-X anti fog? I was thinking of trying it but the package says it may damage some plastics. I always wear a pair of safety glasses and don't have much of a problem with fogging except when I wear a facemask when it is really cold (near 0° F).
When i road motorcycles they had stuff you sprayed inside your goggles and it worked.Me,i use spit.
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Old 01-09-04, 05:52 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coda1
Has anyone tried Rain-X anti fog? I was thinking of trying it but the package says it may damage some plastics. I always wear a pair of safety glasses and don't have much of a problem with fogging except when I wear a facemask when it is really cold (near 0° F).

I have tried just about everything. I find that most of these products work under 'normal' conditions. What I mean about normal is walking from a very cold outside to a warm inside OR perhaps using it on the inside of a motorcycle helmet OR on your binoculars or rifle scoop. I have some stuff that is made locally here in Nova Scotia, and sure it works on my eyeglasses when I walk from outside to inside.

BUT if I use that same stuff for cycling, or snowshoeing and I am sweating alot and VERY warm moisture or.....air is rising from my body, they just don't work (maybe a bit better than without, but negligable).

Again the ONLY thing I have found is to use a very small amount of dishsoap on the lenses. Just a tiny drop to barely cover the whole lens with a very thin film. It will distort your vision somewhat, but not as much if they fog up. Plus it is easy to wipe off and most likely you have to apply for each outing.

One product I have not tried is something called CAT CRAP. No, its not actually crap (but it might work just as well), but a product used for antifog. http://www.catcrap.com/

I hear that it's good, I also hear that RAIN X is good just like that I also heard this stuff I have now is good. I am sure it works under 'normal' conditions, but cycling.......what's to loose but $10?

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Old 01-09-04, 09:05 AM   #22
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Not sure how effective these are...but since nothing else seems to work, at least you'd be styling like Coppi.

http://store.yahoo.com/momovelo/swedsnowgogc.html
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Old 01-21-04, 11:26 AM   #23
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I use double-paned ski goggles. It's been as cold as 10F, and I have never had trouble with fogging. I don't use any goop because the goggles work just fine on their own. My googles have a light yellow tint designed for night use.

I'd suggest going to your local ski/snowboard shop. Mine cost about $40, but if you wait for sales, you could probably get them cheaper.
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Old 01-25-04, 08:27 PM   #24
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cat crap works what are you talking about!!!??!!
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Old 01-26-04, 10:31 PM   #25
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I was skiing this weekend in Idaho with some customers. A smaller group went snowmobiling instead, and had the goggle fog-up problem come up (it was about 15 degrees out, and they were cruising 60 mph).

Believe it or not, a local told them to try potato juice on the inside of the goggles. Apparently it worked!
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