Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-02-06, 09:29 PM   #1
vrkelley
Enjoy
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Seattle metro
Bikes: Trek 5200
Posts: 6,164
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cold legs rerun thread - since threads got nuked

Gads, looks like the "double layer to protect knees" got nuked along with several other knee threads.

At 35F, the PI Thermal Fleece tights fail to keep the whole leg warm esp on steep decents. So last week, I ordered $14 wool tights with feet (sort of panty hose but made of wool) After today's ride, that thin wool layer may not help much.

Unfortunately, the cookie jar is low from buying 2 pair (company paid for one pair as reward for commuting). Wondering how to add an extra layer across the whole leg without binding at the knee??
vrkelley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-06, 09:35 PM   #2
Portis
Banned.
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Home alone
Bikes: Trek 4300 X 2. Trek 1000, Trek 6000
Posts: 6,019
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've never really had a problem with binding at the knee regardless of what i wear. However, if it troubles you, I might suggest you call Lou at www.foxwear.net. He can custom make some tights for you. He can make them out of any fabric you choose. He will even take your measurements and send you fabric samples. From there he will ask you questions to help select the proper material for your situation.

His customer service is amazing. There is a thread here that tells a bit about him. I have a pair of powershield tights that i got from here a couple years ago. They are right between tights and pants and sound like a good fit for you.

Oh yeah, you don't even have to send money till AFTER you get them.
Portis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-06, 10:30 PM   #3
gerv 
In the right lane
 
gerv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Des Moines
Bikes: 1974 Huffy 3 speed
Posts: 9,543
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
I wrote earlier about having having knee problems and cold feet. Today it was 20F (-7C) with a strong NW wind. I decided to try something a little different. Used old-fashioned thick cotton jogging pants over old-fashioned cotton long underwear. I was out 2 hours and figured my feet would freeze (even though had wool socks..) and my knees would pain tonight.

Actually, I had no knee pain at all and my feet were warmer than usual.
gerv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-06, 10:33 PM   #4
Jarery
Senior Member
 
Jarery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Coquitlam
Bikes:
Posts: 2,538
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just wear knee warmers under my winter tights.
Jarery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 12:27 AM   #5
Hezz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 1,649
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes,

Keeping the entire leg warm help to keep the feet warm and lessens knee related problems. Betweem 20 - 35 F I don't think that many tights will keep the legs warm for long. One thing that works really well for me is to use a very soft and stretchy winter bike tight over a regular pair of bike shorts to give extra insulation to the thigh. Then use some knee high wool socks to help keep the calf musles warm under the tight. IF you keep the thigh and calf muscles and most of the leg warm the knee can get by with a little less insulation which helps keep knee articulation easier.

If this combination is still not warm enough then use some loose fitting but breathable cycling pants with a little looser fit over the shorts and tights. This combo is very good for warmth and breathability and reasonably good knee articulation.
Hezz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 06:42 AM   #6
Bockman
Castiron Perineum
 
Bockman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Taking a tip from Siu Blue Wind, I too am typing a lengthy passage of text down here to demonstrate the enormous amount of space available should one wish to use it-- in sharp contrast to the avatar text above this part.
Bikes: '06 Salsa Campeon, '84 Cannondale R1000, 80's Nishiki Ariel
Posts: 1,196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I swear by these:

Col d'Lizárd Swift Icebike Powerstretch 100® Tights


Bockman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 05:03 PM   #7
Wowbagger
Reticient Recluse
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Pittsburgh
Bikes: Trek Soho
Posts: 46
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Probably an unconventional solution, but I wear soft shell mountaineering pants. They're warm enough that I am perfectly comfortable without any further layering at 16F. They are more loose-fitting than cycling tights but that isn't so important to me in winter.
Wowbagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 08:00 PM   #8
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 18,313
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 423 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by vrkelley
Gads, looks like the "double layer to protect knees" got nuked along with several other knee threads.

At 35F, the PI Thermal Fleece tights fail to keep the whole leg warm esp on steep decents. So last week, I ordered $14 wool tights with feet (sort of panty hose but made of wool) After today's ride, that thin wool layer may not help much.

Unfortunately, the cookie jar is low from buying 2 pair (company paid for one pair as reward for commuting). Wondering how to add an extra layer across the whole leg without binding at the knee??
Knicker socks. I can't find as many as I used to be able to but, thankfully, fishermen using breathable waders have come to the rescue. Sock like these are worth the money. They last forever and are wonderfully warm worn under the PI tights.
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 08:03 PM   #9
2manybikes
Dog is my co-pilot
 
2manybikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes: 2 many
Posts: 15,767
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by vrkelley
Gads, looks like the "double layer to protect knees" got nuked along with several other knee threads.

At 35F, the PI Thermal Fleece tights fail to keep the whole leg warm esp on steep decents. So last week, I ordered $14 wool tights with feet (sort of panty hose but made of wool) After today's ride, that thin wool layer may not help much.

Unfortunately, the cookie jar is low from buying 2 pair (company paid for one pair as reward for commuting). Wondering how to add an extra layer across the whole leg without binding at the knee??
To be most comfortable you need a windbreak on the front and breathable on the back. Not the only way to go, but the best by far.

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...isearch=true##

Performance Triflex Tights are actually waterproof on the front and breath on the back half, and flex too. I just add or subtract layers of regular tights underneath the Triflex depending on the temperature.
As many as five thin layers around 10 F.
This is a huge help with the fast decent problem, not perfect, but better than anything else. They are as flexible as anything else.
You can put sandwich bags over your toes and plastic bags just on the front of your legs under regular tights, it works great. It's a lot nicer to have the windbreak front tights when getting dressed and undressed. You can put a plastic bag under the front of a top as well, even a hat or balakclava, works for everything.
2manybikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 08:35 PM   #10
jwbnyc
Seņor Wences
 
jwbnyc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 1,035
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Prod...&viewAll=False
jwbnyc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 08:47 PM   #11
vrkelley
Enjoy
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Seattle metro
Bikes: Trek 5200
Posts: 6,164
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manybikes
To be most comfortable you need a windbreak on the front and breathable on the back. Not the only way to go, but the best by far. ... As many as five thin layers around 10 F.
... sandwich bags
The tri-flex looks like the ticket but I can't justify shelling our another hundred for something that *might* work.

For now, I'll try rain pants over the top, and the bags idea. The col' lizard tights are great but they bind in the knees. Not noticible until, the cadence stays up around 95. I may just cut 'em at the seam and add a swatch of of polar tech to widen the legs.
vrkelley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 09:17 PM   #12
2manybikes
Dog is my co-pilot
 
2manybikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes: 2 many
Posts: 15,767
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by vrkelley
The tri-flex looks like the ticket but I can't justify shelling our another hundred for something that *might* work.

For now, I'll try rain pants over the top, and the bags idea. The col' lizard tights are great but they bind in the knees. Not noticible until, the cadence stays up around 95. I may just cut 'em at the seam and add a swatch of of polar tech to widen the legs.
I don't know how far you go or how hard you ride. If you ride hard you will be sweaty and have wet tights under the rain pants. That's not a disaster, that's up to you to see if you like it.

The bags will help a lot. Just let the back breath. You will probably sweat a little under the bags if you're going hard. But if you keep moving it will stay warm. The open back helps wick some sweat out.

My cadence goes down with more layers in the winter, I just live with it. I'm not usually riding fixed in the winter, so it's not as important. I think you are?

Let me know how you make out.
2manybikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 09:41 PM   #13
vrkelley
Enjoy
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Seattle metro
Bikes: Trek 5200
Posts: 6,164
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah, a cadence of around 55 seems more comfortable in the cold and develops bad habits. What sort of bags are you using? Veggie, bread bag, Ziplock and how do you keep 'em from shifting?
vrkelley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-06, 10:07 PM   #14
2manybikes
Dog is my co-pilot
 
2manybikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes: 2 many
Posts: 15,767
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
Anything that is the right size for you. Even if you cut up a big trash bag. I had some small wastebasket trash bags. I also had some from the grocery store.
When I used bags under tights I had two pieces. The top ovelapping the bottom and cut horizontally near the knee area so it could stretch out a little.
I put on the tights, rolled up one leg to the knee. The held the bottom piece against my leg and carefully rolled the tights down over it with the other hand. Then on the same leg I rolled the top down to the knee or below, held the top piece in place and rolled up the tights. The bags did not move around much with small enough tights. It takes some practice to be able to get the bags on quickly. Even if it drives you nuts the first time, give it a test ride.

Then just take a fold top (not zip kind) sandwich bag over the toes under the shoe, run the long flap up the top of your foot towards the ankle.
2manybikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:09 PM.