Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Senior Member jarhead#42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    830
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Frost bite symptoms

    Been riding all winter , some rides in wisconsin and recently moved back to the poconos . Ive noticed a slight tingly sensation on my toes . Is this like pre frostbite ?
    I train for races on my road bike and use the mountains to do mainly steep climbs because it limits the wind chill and keeps the body temp up on the way up . On the way down is another story . But I dont live far from the mountain , and make it back home before hypotherma can kick in . Anyways , looking forward to hearing about my weird sensations in my toes

  2. #2
    Biscuit Boy Cosmoline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Speeenard 'laska
    Posts
    1,358
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Frostbite is when you can't feel anything. The tingling may mean your toes are cold or that your shoes are too tight. If you have poor circulation in your legs to begin with, you might need to be concerned. Otherwise don't worry too much about it, just increase the insulation around your feet by making sure the fit of shoe is loose (NOT tight), the sock has good insulation and if needed your shoe has some insulation in it as well 200g thinsulate is as much as I've ever needed this side of ten below.
    ''On a bicycle you're not insulated. You're in contact with the landscape and all manner of people you'd never meet if you were in a car. A fat man on a bicycle is nobody's enemy.''

    Tom Vernon.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Most likely it is just toes being cold from the temps and reduced blood circulation.

    Even though the climbing keeps you warm it also puts more pressure on the balls of your feet due to increased pedalling pressure. So as you climb your toes are getting less blood circulation than they need and they will get cold faster then pedalling in the same temps over the flat.

    Tingling is OK. When they stop tingling you need to worry. But tingling is a sign you need to have better insulation on your foot.

  4. #4
    Senior Member vger285's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    ohio
    My Bikes
    Van Dessel CRB, Giant ATX 880,Footbike track
    Posts
    379
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Frostbite

    Frostbite is an injury to the body that is caused by freezing. Frostbite causes a loss of feeling and color in affected areas. It most often affects the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers, or toes. Frostbite can permanently damage the body, and severe cases can lead to amputation. The risk of frostbite is increased in people with reduced blood circulation and among people who are not dressed properly for extremely cold temperatures.
    Recognizing Frostbite

    At the first signs of redness or pain in any skin area, get out of the cold or protect any exposed skin—frostbite may be beginning. Any of the following signs may indicate frostbite:
    • a white or grayish-yellow skin area
    • skin that feels unusually firm or waxy
    • numbness
    A victim is often unaware of frostbite until someone else points it out because the frozen tissues are numb.
    What to Do

    If you detect symptoms of frostbite, seek medical care. Because frostbite and hypothermia both result from exposure, first determine whether the victim also shows signs of hypothermia, as described previously. Hypothermia is a more serious medical condition and requires emergency medical assistance.
    If (1) there is frostbite but no sign of hypothermia and (2) immediate medical care is not available, proceed as follows:
    • Get into a warm room as soon as possible.
    • Unless absolutely necessary, do not walk on frostbitten feet or toes—this increases the damage.
    • Immerse the affected area in warm—not hot—water (the temperature should be comfortable to the touch for unaffected parts of the body).
    • Or, warm the affected area using body heat. For example, the heat of an armpit can be used to warm frostbitten fingers.
    • Do not rub the frostbitten area with snow or massage it at all. This can cause more damage.
    • Don’t use a heating pad, heat lamp, or the heat of a stove, fireplace, or radiator for warming. Affected areas are numb and can be easily burned.
    These procedures are not substitutes for proper medical care. Hypothermia is a medical emergency and frostbite should be evaluated by a health care provider. It is a good idea to take a first aid and emergency resuscitation (CPR) course to prepare for cold-weather health problems. Knowing what to do is an important part of protecting your health and the health of others.
    Taking preventive action is your best defense against having to deal with extreme cold-weather conditions. By preparing your home and car in advance for winter emergencies, and by observing safety precautions during times of extremely cold weather, you can reduce the risk of weather-related health problems.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    White Bear Lake, MN
    My Bikes
    Klein Attitude(off-road), Cannondale M700(commuter), Nishiki Performance Equipe(Roadie)
    Posts
    60
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Maybe this guy can give you some pointers...

    Sub-zero temps and barefeet, a painfully bad idea

  6. #6
    Senior Member jarhead#42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    830
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for all the input .

  7. #7
    無くなった HereNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Sci-Fi Wasabi
    My Bikes
    I built the Bianchi track bike back up today.
    Posts
    5,073
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by zipster
    Maybe this guy can give you some pointers...

    Sub-zero temps and barefeet, a painfully bad idea
    Man, how could anyone be that stupid? I was out riding about an hour and a half that day, in two different runs. Even with three pairs of socks and toe-warmers, it was freaking COLD...

  8. #8
    Spazzy Member zippered's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    t.dot
    My Bikes
    '05 marinoni delta, '86/87 bianchi sport s(e)x, ? kona ?, raleigh '71, specialized crossroads
    Posts
    881
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    hmm... just found this page: www.thepoles.com/expguide/frostbite.htm. it's for mountaineers, but some of the stuff seems relevant.

    sounds like my toes may have gotten to stage two a couple times this year. oops.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •