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Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

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Old 09-19-08, 03:01 PM   #1
macteacher
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I need goggles

Does ANYONE have any recommendation for goggles that will NOT fog up and that will allow me to wear my glasses so I can see?
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Old 09-19-08, 05:06 PM   #2
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I don't have a problem with ski goggles. They can get a little warm, but I don't have a problem with them fogging. Although don't get a cheap pair. Spend at least $40 on a good pair.
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Old 09-19-08, 09:15 PM   #3
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I bought a pair for $60.00 bucks last year...but they fogged up, even after being told they are resistant to fogging up
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Old 09-20-08, 09:42 PM   #4
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I just rubbed some shaving gel on the lenses of some cheap $15 ski goggles.

the key is to have your mouth and nose covers be open enough that it doesn't force your exhaled air to rush up between the opening near the nose and eyes.
oh, and when you exhale through your mouth, blow to the side.
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Old 09-25-08, 11:41 AM   #5
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Did you buy single, or double lens ski goggles.

They must be double lens. I tried a pair of $60 ish single lens goggles from my lbs, and they fogged in the first mile at not-too-cold temps. They were returned that night.

And as AEO said, you have to breathe out forward. If you wear a balaclava, consider (carefully) cutting a hole in front of your mouth to blow the air out of. I blow down so the wind takes the vapor.

I use my balaclava (adding a bird beak over the front of my face when cold enough) and Carrera ski goggles, and have been ok down to -15F air temp with only a very slight bit of fogging.

Good luck!
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Old 09-25-08, 03:09 PM   #6
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You could try the anti-fog stuff that is used on diving goggles.
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Old 09-25-08, 09:11 PM   #7
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Skip the anti fog stuff. Rub some diluted dish detergent / soapy water on there. Worked for my scuba goggles.
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Old 09-25-08, 09:13 PM   #8
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this will work

any of the Scott Turbo Fan Goggles.

It is the only way to keep up with the amount of fog hard efforts can produce.

I know...I am a srs snowboarder (or was) and spent many a steamy run on cold mountains
and only the Scott Turbos -really- stay fog free. if they do start to fog, crank the fan from low to high
fog will be gone in seconds.

no the fan won't freeze your face...if you are making fog, your face is warm.

http://www.kaboodle.com/reviews/smit...wsport-goggles

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Old 10-29-08, 09:26 AM   #9
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Who the heck wants to spend $180 on goggles.

here is a link to cheap goggles. Some good, some not so good. http://www.labsafety.com/store/Safet...ewear/Goggles/
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Old 10-29-08, 09:19 PM   #10
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Part of the problem with goggles fogging is when your head gets too hot. The warm moist air and temperature differential cause the fogging. You usually can solve it by keeping cool air moving over the inside of the lens or to increase the amount of ventilation your head has so your head is not so hot.

One of the cheap good solutions is to use a pair of oversized lab safety glasses over your regular glasses. They let enough air pass underneath to stay pretty fog free but still block the cold wind from your eyes. They won't be as warm as goggles though.

read this thread:

Ski goggles or what???

Last edited by Hezz; 10-29-08 at 09:25 PM.
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Old 10-30-08, 02:41 AM   #11
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Oh goddam, no way am I wearing lab safety goggles. No way. People already think I'm nuts, I don't need to give them more ammunition.
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Old 10-30-08, 10:12 AM   #12
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my lab safety goggle I wear look slick. Orange with silver wrap arounds, prescription lens block out most wind. Steep downhills still tear my eyes a little as some air get around. Best part....company bought them.
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Old 10-30-08, 07:15 PM   #13
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Oh goddam, no way am I wearing lab safety goggles. No way. People already think I'm nuts, I don't need to give them more ammunition.
Ya, well no claim was made that it wasn't nerdy. Just that it works.
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Old 11-05-08, 10:15 PM   #14
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Well, I haven't winter cycled yet, but I have been motorcycling for the past 10 years in the winter. I would go to your local motorcycle dealer and try some on. I personally like spy optic goggles, never had problems with them in the winter and they are normally priced low ($30-45).

Or take a look here

http://www.motorcyclesuperstore.com/...ding-Gear.aspx
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Old 11-06-08, 10:24 PM   #15
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Spys are slick, but I'd go with a double-lens snow model.

Cycling kicks off a lot more heat and there's less wind to evaporate the fogging.

I'd had great success riding with snow goggles in all winter conditions, but I've never had glasses underneath, and I think that might create additional issues.
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Old 11-06-08, 10:52 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
Spys are slick, but I'd go with a double-lens snow model.

Cycling kicks off a lot more heat and there's less wind to evaporate the fogging.

I'd had great success riding with snow goggles in all winter conditions, but I've never had glasses underneath, and I think that might create additional issues.
Yes, glasses underneath do create more issues. The glasses underneath the goggles reduce the amount of air that can free flow inside the goggles and so you get fogging more easily. Plus you can get fogging from both lenses which double the amount of fog making it impossible to see through. But of course it looks kind of goofy. But then again you could look like Carlos Sastre in the TDF.

I have finally found that glasses alone work better and stay fog free but they are not as warm. However, I think the best way to deal with this is to put some kind of protection on your face. Lately I have been sticking a piece of stretchy medical tape on my nose to keep my glasses from rubbing a sore on my nose while riding. I have been having this problem as of late. I found that the tape also kept my glasses from sliding down my nose and I think a larger more full coverage on the nose would keep it warm in cold temperatures as well.
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Old 11-07-08, 07:28 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Hezz View Post
I have finally found that glasses alone work better and stay fog free but they are not as warm. However, I think the best way to deal with this is to put some kind of protection on your face. Lately I have been sticking a piece of stretchy medical tape on my nose to keep my glasses from rubbing a sore on my nose while riding. I have been having this problem as of late. I found that the tape also kept my glasses from sliding down my nose and I think a larger more full coverage on the nose would keep it warm in cold temperatures as well.
Where do you ride, and what are the winter conditions like?
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Old 11-07-08, 09:42 PM   #18
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these are good http://www.esseyepro.com/ I bought them to keep rain off my glasses but they did not work well for that. but if I remember right they did not fog up.
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Old 11-08-08, 06:01 PM   #19
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Where do you ride, and what are the winter conditions like?
Jim, the winter conditions that I ride in are somewhat more mild than around Boston. Around Bountiful, Utah (10 miles north of Salt Lake) it is generally between 15-35F in the cold winter months during the day but it is generally of low humidity. This, I think makes it a little milder than the northeastern states which are generally a little colder and more humid.

I would think that in higher humidity conditions fogging would be an even bigger problem, but I may be wrong.

I have found that if I can keep my nose, head and ears warmer that I can go with glasses just fine down to 15F. But I might want to pull the neck gaitor up over my chin. I use a bike free ride helmet which is warmer than a standard bike helmet and covers the back of my head better. It has about the right amount of venting for cold conditions. A vented snowboarding helmet will work to and even have some ear flaps. I'm going to experiment with stretchy medical tape on my nose this winter since I have been using a small amount to keep my glasses from wearing a sore on my nose anyway. I will use a little bigger piece of tape to cover most of my upper nose. I think this will just be enough to break the cold wind.

I have even gone for night rides at about 10F in non windy conditions wearing just my free ride helmet with a thin skull cap underneath it and my neck gaitor and glasses. In the end it was my feet and fingers that gave out first. Not my face or head. I think the tape on the nose will be even better. This tape that I am talking about is a kind of stetchy woven knit cloth tape designed for holding bandages on in situations where some give is needed. Not the older canvas type of tape. Though I haven't used it in the cold yet, it looks like it has some small amount of insulation qualities.

Another idea which I would like to try would be to use one of the inexpensive full coverage bike helmets which are designed for BMX and downhill biking events. I think that one of these combined with glasses instead of goggles would work pretty well.

http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/138...omp-Helmet.htm

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Old 11-08-08, 11:20 PM   #20
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With a full face helmet you have the added issue of the chinbar pushing the moisture from your breath back at your face (and glasses), making it easier to fog glasses when stopped.

I've found these helmets are comfortable in the winter, but you gotta go with a double-lens goggle, and a facemask that directs your breath down out the bottom of the helmet.
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Old 11-09-08, 12:10 AM   #21
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With a full face helmet you have the added issue of the chinbar pushing the moisture from your breath back at your face (and glasses), making it easier to fog glasses when stopped.

I've found these helmets are comfortable in the winter, but you gotta go with a double-lens goggle, and a facemask that directs your breath down out the bottom of the helmet.
I didn't really think of this problem, but I'm sure you are right. Perhaps it doesn't make much sense to try it out since it will probably fog up goggles and glasses easier than an open face helmet would.
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