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Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

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Old 10-14-08, 09:25 AM   #1
Square & Compas
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50% cotton 50% polyester.

I need to get a new pair of long john bottoms to go under my Specialized Therminal tights. I ride a recumbent and the tights do a great job at blocking the wind from the front, but under the backs of my legs get really cold because the wind and cold air has easy access to the space between my legs and the seat. The therminal tights do not have any wind panels in the back, just the front. They are more designed for diamond frame bike use. No one makes a wind blocking, moisture wicking, thermal, insulated bike tight for recumbent riders.

What I do to keep the backs of my legs warm is wear long john bottoms underneath along with a pair of my Under Armour compression shorts as the base layer. But I need a new pair of long john bottoms. The ones I have are for temps 30 degrees F or above with little to no wind. While the temps may not be below 30 yet when the wind is blowing or the wind generated by my riding makes it colder.

I am still looking at my options but I have found a pair that is 50% cotton and 50% polyester. The cotton layer is the outside layer and the poly is the inside which contacts the skin. We all know that cotton when it gets wet it retains the moisture, the last thing a cyclist in the cold weather wants to have happen.

I would like your opinion on if what you think about or would like to know what kind of experience you have had with wearing a 50/50 garment like this with another moisture wicking garment, like the Specioalized Therminal tights or the Pearl Izumi Amfib's over the top. Did the cotton retain the moisture between the 2 garments you you felt or got colder? Do yuou think this would happen or do you think the outside tight garment would pull the moisture off of the cotton layer so it can evaporate off or is not trapped making me cold?

I am most interested in this style of long john because it is still thin enough to fit well under the therminal tights. I can go heavier but it may not fit too well under the tights because it is thicker. Cotton, while not a good moisture wicker is a great insulator. With synthetic materials to get the insulation you need to go with a thicker garment or figure out a way to completely block the wind and that only works for so long and so far.

Thanks.
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Old 10-14-08, 10:42 AM   #2
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50 poly + 50 cotton = 100% crap







you want wool...W O O L.....it works all the time every time
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Old 10-14-08, 11:03 AM   #3
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50 poly + 50 cotton = 100% crap







you want wool...W O O L.....it works all the time every time
You know I never even thought about wool. I forgot it is the only 100% natural material that insulates with out requiring a lot of thickness and wicks moisture away from the skin rather then retains it.

Thanks
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Old 10-14-08, 11:33 AM   #4
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or some silk ones.. www.sierratradingpost.com
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Old 10-16-08, 09:08 PM   #5
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I don't recommend long johns of any kind under the outer tights. Use a pair of warm but lighter weight cycling tights without a chamois under the heavier outer ones. They will wick and be very warm combined with the outer tight. And will make pedaling easier since they are made of very stretchy material which long johns usually are not. They will allow your knee better movement. Stay away from any kind of cotton.
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Old 10-16-08, 09:12 PM   #6
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You know I never even thought about wool. I forgot it is the only 100% natural material that insulates with out requiring a lot of thickness and wicks moisture away from the skin rather then retains it.

Thanks
Actually wool does not exactly wick. It absorbs moisture very well but because of the skin or shell on the fiber it feels less wet on the skin than cotton does. It is better than cotton but still not recommended for high perspiration activities in cold weather when you have better options. Wool does not stretch well so it will bind the knee much more than cycling specific tights.
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Old 10-17-08, 06:50 AM   #7
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Actually wool does not exactly wick. It absorbs moisture very well but because of the skin or shell on the fiber it feels less wet on the skin than cotton does. It is better than cotton but still not recommended for high perspiration activities in cold weather when you have better options. Wool does not stretch well so it will bind the knee much more than cycling specific tights.


my experience is wool can be snug when you put it on and loosens up and settles in the first 2 miles.
no binding. it stretches fine. depends on who makes your gear. ibex and ortovox is good stuff.


only wool or silk is appropriate if you want 3 crucial things

1) to sweat into a cold day and not freeze up later on when your energy drops

2) to not feel clammy, ever

3) to not stink like a dead racoon whether you wash it or not.
yes washing is always recommended
but on multi-day activiteis, or mild cold rinse....day after day after day wool is fine. synthetics...all
synthetics...would reek after just one sweaty use.

Last edited by 127.0.0.1; 10-17-08 at 06:56 AM.
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Old 10-17-08, 09:29 AM   #8
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how about any number of non-cycling specific windstopper stretch tights seen from manufacturers like mountain hardwear, marmot, patagonia, arxteryx, sporthill, etc? leave the cotton for relaxin'.
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