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Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

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Old 11-09-08, 02:01 PM   #1
bleckb
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I want dry feet in the rain!

Is it possible?

Right now I have a pair of Pearl Amfib shoe covers that I wear over Sidi Challengers. (I think that's there model name. They have a perforated upper with some mesh, a single velcro strap and a ratchet) I think the water works its way in through the hole for the cleats, wicks upward via the inside of the shoe covers, and then seeps in via the mesh and perforation.

When I finish a wet ride (commute or other) the shoe is wet more on the inside, more on the sole. The water has wicked up my socks to chill my feet. If I could keep my feet dry it would be so much nicer. I'm planning on some boots for when the snow flies, but shoes and covers are more practical when it's only kinda wet, but raining, if I can find a way to keep the feet dry. Any thoughts on what be done?
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Old 11-09-08, 02:37 PM   #2
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Plastic bags over the shoes before putting on the booties works great. No need to cut a cleat hole either, just clip in, so nowhere for water to get in except from the top.
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Old 11-09-08, 07:26 PM   #3
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Are you thinking something along the lines of grocery bags or sandwich bags? Something else? Since I will be getting wet feet a lot, I'm looking for a one-shot solution, if there is such a thing.
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Old 11-10-08, 11:38 AM   #4
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Sealskin waterproof socks are pretty good. Ive just cycled through a heavy rainstorn at 10C and my feet are fine.
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Old 11-10-08, 11:40 AM   #5
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Specialized BG Defroster MTB shoes/boots. $160. They are a little warm; too warm to wear unless the temperature is under 45 degrees.
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Old 11-10-08, 11:51 AM   #6
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Are you thinking something along the lines of grocery bags or sandwich bags? Something else? Since I will be getting wet feet a lot, I'm looking for a one-shot solution, if there is such a thing.
I've used sandwich-type bags, only bigger, but I'm thinking I'll try produce bags & see if they hold up for a couple of rides. Long-term, I'd try a waterproof sock like Michael indicates, although that leaves your shoes wet obviously.
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Old 11-10-08, 12:05 PM   #7
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I would definitely go for the waterproof socks. I have tried three different shoecovers and Gore Tex shoes, but the socks are the only thing that works. And it rains a lot here.

Hans
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Old 11-10-08, 12:07 PM   #8
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I have 1 pair of waterproof socks - they are great for keeping my feet dry. But my shoes still get wet... plastic grocery bag and elastics works great but looks cheesy.
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Old 11-10-08, 01:41 PM   #9
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Some observations:

1. The very technology that excludes water will by definition retain sweat. (Unless you've swallowed the Gore-Tex kool-aid and live in that delusion.)

2. There is a level of water in the environment driving in at all angles that will overcome any water-exclusion technique. Given that reality, . . .

3. The significant target is to reduce the hypothermic effects of cold water flow.

Regarding plastic, those sleeves in which the newspaper is delivered to the front door are ducky for pulling over socks but under the shoe. In the cold a bootie goes over the whole sock-sleeve-shoe gob. Obviously, this drill assumes one has accepted a level of Existential Wetness from Trapped Sweat in exchange for warm, albeit humid, feet.
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Old 11-10-08, 02:10 PM   #10
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Waterproof and warm to way below zero.
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Old 11-23-08, 01:24 PM   #11
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I think I'm headed toward waterproof socks. There are quite a few options I'm finding, from sealskinz (suggested) to Cabela's house brand to more than I can count really. Most of the Sealskinz reviews seem to support them being a good choice for cyclists. I'm thinking that between the socks (some of which suggest a thin liner sock for wicking) and the am-fib shoe covers, I may be able to avoid dropping a bunch of money on some boots.
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Old 11-23-08, 01:30 PM   #12
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Waterproof and warm to way below zero.
what's that? me wanna
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Old 11-23-08, 02:15 PM   #13
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Is it possible?

Right now I have a pair of Pearl Amfib shoe covers that I wear over Sidi Challengers. (I think that's there model name. They have a perforated upper with some mesh, a single velcro strap and a ratchet) I think the water works its way in through the hole for the cleats, wicks upward via the inside of the shoe covers, and then seeps in via the mesh and perforation.

When I finish a wet ride (commute or other) the shoe is wet more on the inside, more on the sole. The water has wicked up my socks to chill my feet. If I could keep my feet dry it would be so much nicer. I'm planning on some boots for when the snow flies, but shoes and covers are more practical when it's only kinda wet, but raining, if I can find a way to keep the feet dry. Any thoughts on what be done?
If you read my thread entitled: "My quest for the ultimate winter cycling shoe", I show a method for covering the holes and slots in the bottom of the shoe. You can also just use some clear silicone glue to fill in all of the slots. This will add very little weight to the shoe and be removable with an exacto knife should you need to change out the clips. You will be a lot warmer if the shoe does not leak water in through the bottom.
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Old 11-24-08, 10:53 AM   #14
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that's a heck of a project

I don't see myself going to quite the lengths you are Hezz, but I see how I can seal at least the bottom of the sole with some shoe goop or something along those lines. Great idea. I think there will still be a bit of a wicking problem, but with a silk liner sock and sealskinz inside the shoe and the pearl amfib covers, I'm hopeful.
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Old 11-24-08, 10:57 AM   #15
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Duct tape over the holes from the inside, then put the liner back in . Those above winter riders are Gaerne Eskimos, bone dry last winter after 2.5 hours in full on slush ride. As I get older my feet have been getting colder, best money I've ever spent on gear. I'm going to look at getting those water proof socks for when it's not cold but I'd rather the shoes weren't soaking wet all day.
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Old 11-24-08, 11:27 AM   #16
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what's that? me wanna
That is the Gaerne Eskimo MTB.
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Old 11-24-08, 11:32 AM   #17
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There is a road version as well. For more insane winter bootie-ness check out the Polar as well.
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Old 12-07-08, 01:55 PM   #18
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Try wearing gaters over whatever else you're wearing. Then the cuff of you boot is not exposed.
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Old 12-07-08, 09:36 PM   #19
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Is it possible?

Right now I have a pair of Pearl Amfib shoe covers that I wear over Sidi Challengers. (I think that's there model name. They have a perforated upper with some mesh, a single velcro strap and a ratchet) I think the water works its way in through the hole for the cleats, wicks upward via the inside of the shoe covers, and then seeps in via the mesh and perforation.

When I finish a wet ride (commute or other) the shoe is wet more on the inside, more on the sole. The water has wicked up my socks to chill my feet. If I could keep my feet dry it would be so much nicer. I'm planning on some boots for when the snow flies, but shoes and covers are more practical when it's only kinda wet, but raining, if I can find a way to keep the feet dry. Any thoughts on what be done?
Rocky gore tex socks: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___19988

I use them as vapor barriers for bc skiing, for running and hiking in the rain, and for keeping my feet warm and dry in the rain.........
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Old 12-08-08, 12:26 PM   #20
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All of these great ideas and it's been almost drought dry since I've gotten my silk socks ans sealskinz. I'm not sure whether to close with a or a
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Old 12-08-08, 01:03 PM   #21
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It's better to have gear you haven't used yet than needing gear you don't have. So, I'd say go for
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Old 12-08-08, 01:27 PM   #22
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At temps above 0C/32F, you just can't beat sandals, sealskinz and wool socks. Not only do your feet stay dry, you don't have to wait hours for your shoes to dry before you can use them again.
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Old 09-29-09, 10:44 PM   #23
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Plastic bags over the shoes before putting on the booties works great. No need to cut a cleat hole either, just clip in, so nowhere for water to get in except from the top.
hey good idea.... i don't really know why they can't just make a damn bootie which is as effective. really is a joke.
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Old 09-29-09, 10:48 PM   #24
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Some observations:

1. The very technology that excludes water will by definition retain sweat. (Unless you've swallowed the Gore-Tex kool-aid and live in that delusion.)

2. There is a level of water in the environment driving in at all angles that will overcome any water-exclusion technique. Given that reality, . . .

3. The significant target is to reduce the hypothermic effects of cold water flow.

Regarding plastic, those sleeves in which the newspaper is delivered to the front door are ducky for pulling over socks but under the shoe. In the cold a bootie goes over the whole sock-sleeve-shoe gob. Obviously, this drill assumes one has accepted a level of Existential Wetness from Trapped Sweat in exchange for warm, albeit humid, feet.

don't go off the deep end mate. Warm sweaty socks are a welcome environment for most any three hour ride in the middle of winter. It's when the road slush mixes in that the misery sets begins

ok i'm done resurrecting old threads.
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Old 09-30-09, 02:21 AM   #25
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Myself, I wear Redwing waterproof(breathable) insulated steeltoed workboots.
These have the added advantage of fulfilling the safety footwear requirement at work,
so the company paid half their cost.
I've wear 'em year 'round, from 100F to -20F. Below -5F I'll stuff handwarmers on top of my toes.
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