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-   -   My hands keep Freezing, what can I do? (http://www.bikeforums.net/winter-cycling/500471-my-hands-keep-freezing-what-can-i-do.html)

raevyn 01-08-09 02:09 PM

My hands keep Freezing, what can I do?
 
I am currently riding with MEC lobster claws, and some canadian tire ATV pogies, but nothing seems to be helping. I rode my bike to school yesterday in -19C weather, and by the time i got to school, my hands were like blocks of ice, and have been hurting since. what can i do to prevent this?

asmallsol 01-08-09 03:09 PM

make sure your gloves are try to begin with, and put them on when your hands are already warm.


If your gloves just don't seem to be cutting it, get some moose mitts. My lbs hand makes some. Go to trails-edge.com to order some.

pyze-guy 01-08-09 03:49 PM

I found the best for cold hands to be wool gloves under large windproof gloves. I bought the Traverse gloves and wear them with the wool gloves underneath as the fleece liner gloves are useless.. Windproof is the key I fiind for warth in winter. Even better would be windproof mittens over wool gloves.

vger285 01-08-09 04:06 PM

Get some moose mitts, then wear a light pair of glove liners, and if it gets really cold,you can put a pair of hand warmers inside the moose mitts for extra heat,but only if it's really cold.

ejbarnes 01-08-09 04:28 PM

I go with the ski gloves or snowmobile mitts when it gets below -10. CTC has a nice selection. I tried a pair or LG lobster claws and they too are cold. They seem to be too tight/restrictive.

Treker 01-08-09 06:29 PM

+1 on the ski/snowboard gloves. I'm using a good pair of Burton gloves that I bought near the end of last season at 50% off. Those combined with a pair of dollar store kid's gloves underneath and I'm good to -25C.

If you're hands are getting cold despite good gear, could it be a function of your intensity? When I head out, I wind up pretty quickly to a sharp pace with high rpms. I feel a bit on my hands at the outset but within 10 minutes or so, I'm comfortable.

pmt 01-08-09 07:15 PM

You can also use chemical heaters in the lobster claws. Hold them in place around each two-finger set with baby socks.

rule 01-08-09 07:58 PM

If you are not keeping your core warm your body will automatically restrict the blood flow to your extremities to protect your vital organs. So step one is always take care of your core. Otherwise you can be wasting your time focusing on what you are wearing on your hands (and feet.)

raevyn 01-08-09 09:36 PM

my core stays pretty warm, in fact I am usually sweating a bit. its only the hands that seem to be affected. I might try some snowboarding gloves or something. tonights ride home was really bad

StephenH 01-08-09 09:43 PM

Putting pressure on your hands can make your hands go numb, but can also let your hands get colder (even if they don't go numb)- so if you have anyway to take some pressure off your hands, that might help.

ghettocruiser 01-08-09 10:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StephenH (Post 8148732)
Putting pressure on your hands can make your hands go numb, but can also let your hands get colder (even if they don't go numb)- so if you have anyway to take some pressure off your hands, that might help.


Word. A death-grip on the handlebars (which I tend to do on slippery roads) doesn't help either.

Wiggle your fingers around a bit, and loosen your grip if no hazards are imminent.

Hezz 01-08-09 10:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by raevyn (Post 8146015)
I am currently riding with MEC lobster claws, and some canadian tire ATV pogies, but nothing seems to be helping. I rode my bike to school yesterday in -19C weather, and by the time i got to school, my hands were like blocks of ice, and have been hurting since. what can i do to prevent this?

Sounds to me like you have a really bad cold hand problem since you are pretty much already using an industrial approach by combining the ATV pogies with the lobster claws.

I would try the following methods.

Try to keep your head, core and feet a little warmer. It may help keep your overall circulation a little warmer.

Remove the ATV pogies and sew an additional layer of polyester insulation ( at least an inch thick) and a fleece lining to cover the polyester batting. This will increase the insulation value of the pogies.

Make sure the pogies have a highly wind resistant outer material. If they don't cover them with some kind of breathable wind resistant cloth. Like uncoated ripstop nylon or polyester microfiber. Or get some better ones designed for extreme cold weather cycling. The pogies that I have seen for really cold conditions come a little further up your arm and fit around your arm without letting in too much air. This means that they are a little harder to slide in but they trap a lot more warm air inside.

Use some duct tape to secure the pogies and seal them around the handle bar so that no cold air is getting in where it wraps around the handle bar.

Make sure that there is a little bit of air space and the things are not too tight.

Try some high quality fingerless cycling gloves with good palm padding under your lobster gloves if they will fit. It could be that the nerve in your hand is sensitive or that the blood supply to your hand is being cut off from pressure from the grips or handlebar.

Change the grips to Ergon or something similar so there is a better surface area on the palm of your hand. It may keep your hand warmer. Or make your own grips out of thick foam which will keep your hands warmer than standard grips will. Thick foam grips will be the warmest and light too.

As was stated above, keep your hands relaxed on the grips and don't grip the bar tightly. There can be an even greater tendency to do this in winter riding conditions because you may feel less secure. This will keep all the blood squeezed out of your hand.

Try the cycling gloves inside a full mitten instead of the lobster claws.

jbabic 01-09-09 04:37 AM

Try waterproof mittens. I had the same problem until I got a pair from Campmor. Now my fingers are toasty. I ordered a size larger to accommodate layering.

cyclezealot 01-09-09 04:44 AM

Yesterday, I put glove liners under my long fingered cycling gloves.. I was fine.

Metzinger 01-09-09 05:01 AM

Arm and wrist warmth is critical for me. So is keeping fingers together as much as possible.
For real cold, I use a backcountry type mitt. MEC's got a bunch to choose from. They have a gauntlet that you can pull up over the sleeves of your jacket. Plus your fingers are all together in one happy little bunch. I've had many different lobsterclaw types and have always been disappointed in their performance when compared to similar mitts.

PlatyPius 01-09-09 06:52 AM

Don't ride in the winter.

:p

raevyn 01-09-09 11:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hezz (Post 8148914)
Remove the ATV pogies and sew an additional layer of polyester insulation ( at least an inch thick) and a fleece lining to cover the polyester batting. This will increase the insulation value of the pogies.

Going to the fabric store today to look into these fabrics!

LarDasse74 01-09-09 11:43 AM

I used to get cold hands a lot... cold hands and feet. I solved the cold hands problem by getting some big ugly cheap skidoo mitts from a discount store. I think I paid $10 at Saan for my first pair, and $7 at Giant Tiger (I don't think you have GT in Western Canada) for my most recent pair. They are roomy enough that I could put a thin pair of wooly gloves underneath too if I wanted - but so far I have not needed to.

My cold feet problem has never been satisfactorily solved :(

TRaffic Jammer 01-09-09 11:50 AM

Snowboard gloves here as well, can't go wrong with ski/snow stuff. Gotta be wind/water proof, hands generate no heat when riding so bundle them up.

uoficowboy 01-09-09 02:22 PM

Keep your core hot - that'll help a lot. I use an old pair of Reusch ski racing gloves that are something like 8 or so years old - and my hands pretty much ever, ever get cold.

randomgear 01-09-09 07:54 PM

Something that hasn't been mentioned yet: bare aluminum handlebars will draw heat from your hands very quickly, rubber grips (or other insulating material) will act as a thermal break and reduce that significantly.
Likewise, a cotton bartape wrapped handlebar might not be the best thing for winter riding if your hands are getting cold.

A tip from http://chiccyclist.blogspot.com/
"Winter cyclists, don't forget to take your hands off the handlebars and stretch and move them, rub them together, whatever, to keep the blood flowing.
Happy hands keep cyclists happy."

Good luck.

ijgrant 01-11-09 01:03 AM

I use fleece liner gloves, with heavy mittens over top. Mittens are the way to go. Make sure they're big enough to go over your liner gloves, and that you can still reach your brakes.

alanf 01-12-09 02:53 AM

I too use lobster claws (scissor fingers) made by Trek. Mine are about ten or more years old, so they are getting thin and thus not as warm, but they seem to be better than the MEC gloves. I really like them as I feel more secure with two fingers on the brake and two on the bar. I've tried all kinds of gloves and none compare with these. They are so comfy that I wear them in the summer for wipeout protection unless it is quite warm out.

I read some people suggesting (on another thread) putting a big muff over the handlebar like the old snowmobile handlebar thingys that were popular before electric thumb warmers came along. I know they were a bit awkward and maybe even dangerous if you have to get your hand out of them quickly.

Years ago I got a pair of electric socks at Canadian Tire because my vehicle was very cold. They worked like a charm. Battery cycled on and off periodically like a electric baseboard heater and lasted a long time like 10 to 15 hours on a "D" cell as I recall. They were made by Nordic Gear. They have gloves also but I have never tried them.
http://workingperson.com/brands/1/Nordic+Gear.html

If anyone tries them drop us a line to let us know how they worked.

alanf 01-12-09 02:55 AM

Here's another link
http://www.brookstone.com/shop/produ...a-000423bb4e95

alanf 01-12-09 03:18 AM

Something else that I tried this year is to lower my seat, as this takes pressure off my wrist, allowing better circulation and makes it easier to put my foot out if I start to slide.


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