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  1. #1
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    need winter clothes...$500 -750 budget

    I'm planning to train all winter and have stocked up on spinerval DVD's and purchased a Kurt Kinetic trainer...But I want to stay outdoors as much as I can through the winter..

    What do I need?

    I've purchased Assos Element One jacket... and so far this is all I have.

    Do I need warmers?

    Gloves?

    Shoe covers?

    Base layers?

    Hat under helmet?

    tights?

    Budget is $500-750....I ride a road bike in Nortern Va with temps 35-55 degrees...Please help me build a winter bike wardrobe !

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    Wind
    Water
    Insulation

    block as much wind from hitting your skin as possible. Shoe covers are great if you don't have a wind/waterproof boot. Gloves are a must. There is a wide range of gloves out there, so try a few on and ae what you like. Your LBS probably stocks common winter gloves for your area (such as PI Lobster Wind). In 35 degree plus weather you shouldn't need a super heavy glove, but a liner and windproof shell are important.

    I wear a homemade wool balaclava, but there are many put there. Again, wind protection is your friend. As far as general clothing, that depends on the length of your ride. A 10 mile commute may require some better layering techniques where as the occasional 3 miler won't be long enough to really get you cold.

    Drink LOTS of water both on and off the bike.

  3. #3
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Full fingered gloves and/or mitts depending on how cold you want to go ... <$5 from your local $$ Store or Walmart.

    Booties ... $30-$50 from MEC

    Base layers ... merino wool from local thrift shop $5-$10; from MEC $50ish; and/or polypro from Sierra Trading Post $10-$20

    Balaclava for really cold days ... <$20 MEC

    Headband for coolish days ... <$5 $$ Store

    Neck gaiter to prevent cold air from rushing down your neck ... <$5 $$ Store

    Tights ... <$20 Nashbar or <$15 Walmart (Ladies sports wear section)

    Extra top layers ... wool from local thrift shop $5-$10

  4. #4
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    First off I ride year round the Buffalo NY (there are others that ride in even colder and worse weather places). I'd place your needs along what we need for Fall and Spring. You certainly don't need to buy expensive top brand name equipment to get excellent results.

    My personal favorite outer gear vendor is Lou at www.foxwear.net. The stuff Lou make is of excellent quality, super function and looks very descent. If having a fancy lable on your coat is important, don't call Lou... otherwise you've found a great supplier that custom makes every single piece of clothing to your exact needs. The various types of wind proof fleeces that are on the market today are amazing. I have a coat that I can wear from about 50F down to 12F without having to add anything more that a T shirt underneath. He can make things in the right weight of material that is just right for your climate needs. I have the Power Shield Pant for Winter riding and they are amazing. They are super comfy and keep the wind out and keep my legs warm.

    I find a good versatile soft shell coat and some sort of winter weight tights are essential. I just don't get the the whole arm warmers and leg armers. I am much more comfortable with a coat or tights. The breathable materials ensure that you canbe comfortable over a wide range of temperatures.

    For keep your hands warm, nothing beats pogies/climmits/etc. I started using Climmits on my hybrid for winter cycling last year and completely LOVE them. I now wear some thin gloves even in the worst of winter. By keeping the wind off my hands they stay nice and comfortable. As a side bonus, there is less change of moisture from getting into the brakes/shifters so I have far less issues with shifting when it gets cold.

    My primary cycling shoes are all mesh and are completely useless once the temperatures start to drop. I've used shoe covers and they definitely work. I am too cheap to go buy a set of winter grade cycling shoes so instead I just ordered a set of Shimano SPD shoes that have much less venting than my summer shoes. That should help extend my riding down to around freezing. Once I appreach freezing I need to add the toe covered or full shoe covers.

    For winter riding I use an older helmet that fits a little loose, and also has relatively poor ventilation compared to my nice summer helmet. I found a Turtle Fur beany style cap at my local ski shop. It is designed to be used with a ski helmet, but works great with a bike helmet. It keeps my ears nice and warm, yet lets sweat and extra heat vent as needed. It works great right down to about 15F. With temp much lower than that I switch over to a balaclava to provide protection for my cheeks. I don't have to use the balaclava much each winter, but it is nice for those extra cold days. Depending on how adapt you are at dealing with cold temperatures you may or may not need one.

    As far as extra top layers, I generaly wear just a T-shirt under my Evap Coat from foxwear. Only when the temps drop into the single digits to I get out my long sleeve jersey and add it as an additional layer.

    If you keep riding intot he Fall your body should slowly get used to the colder temperatures. Be sure that you don't over dress. If you feel comfy outside before you start riding, then your are almost certainly over dressed. I usually feel cold for the 1st 1/2 mile. I ride nice and easy to get the blood flowing everywhere. Once you get past the 1st few minutes, I'll start picking up the pace a bit. By the time I am riding for a one to two miles I am already starting to sweat a little. Just keep your extemities warm. You core will not be hard to keep warm.

    Happy riding,
    André

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    Honestly, if the lowest temp you bike at is 35 degrees and you won't be biking in the wet, you don't need that much specialized bike gear. Starting from the top -
    1. Head - maybe I'm just hardened off living here in Minnesota, but I don't even wear anything on my head above freezing. If you're having trouble keeping warm perhaps as under-helmet cap or helmet cover would help, but I'm not sure it's necessary.
    2. Torso - Cycling specific jackets can certainly be nice, but they're not "needed" - as long as you avoid wearing anything that's not-breathable waterproof (like a cheaper rain jacket, or a winter ski jacket) you can just put on more layers of your regular stuff - especially fleece stuff. If you're willing to spend the cash on a jacket, I was going to say to be sure to buy something windproof, but it looks like the jacket you bought isn't. Still, it will probably be fine.
    3. Hands - Windproof cycling specific gloves are probably something you "need". Unless you have absolutely terrible circulation, I can't imagine you would want to buy lobster gloves - you probably don't need anything above a basic windproof cycling glove.
    4. Legs - I would get something that at least covered your legs. Again, it's personal preference how much you need, but again something windproof is nice.
    5. Feet - Either shoes covers or winter shoes (like Specialized makes a "Defroster" winter shoe). Shoe covers are (obviously) a lot less expensive than specific winter shoes. The drawback is that they're a PITA to take on and off the shoe every time you go out.

    The big thing with cold weather gear is to get gear that's Windproof + Breathable. If you can keep the wind from chilling you down, your ride gets a *lot* more comfortable. Gore "windstopper" stuff has a good reputation for being pretty windproof.

    On the other hand, you could go the route I did - the most windproof stuff seems to be about as breathable as the really expensive waterproof stuff. And I didn't want to accidentally end up in the rain when it was cold out, so I just bought the expensive waterproof stuff. The drawback is it gets uncomfortably hot and stuffy above 50 degrees, and intolerably so above 60 degrees (if I'm biking hard). It also varies from person to person - some people sweat a lot and it doesn't breath enough for them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by andrelam View Post
    ..For keep your hands warm, nothing beats pogies/climmits/etc. I started using Climmits on my hybrid for winter cycling last year and completely LOVE them. I now wear some thin gloves even in the worst of winter. By keeping the wind off my hands they stay nice and comfortable. As a side bonus, there is less change of moisture from getting into the brakes/shifters so I have far less issues with shifting when it gets cold. ...
    Those seem like they would be waaaaaaaaaaaay overkill for someone who's not riding below freezing. It's like suggesting heavy arctic gear for someone who's going to build a campfire on a nice fall day, lol.

    The big thing with cold weather gear is to get stuff that's windproof (and breathable). I know I can nearly wear warm summer biking gear (shorts, tshirt) underneath a windproof layer and be fine down to freezing. And windproof shell also has a much wider temp range (as it isn't actually making you much warmer) than insulating stuff, so you can often ride in the same clothing at 60 degrees and 35 degrees.

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    I always feel like I should answer every person that responds to my posts, especially when the responses are as helpful and well written as all of yours have been. THANK YOU ALL for the great tips.

    Don't laugh, but I had to look up Balaclava. When I was a kid, I lived in Vermont and delivered newspapers in -30 degree weather wearing what I called a ski mask...Lucky for me it really doesn't get cold in Virginia. (you've gotta chuckle seeing what people wear here in temps below 40....They look like they're ready for an Arctic adventure.

    I started with a jacket, hopefully not a mistake. I should have stopped here first.

    http://www.spadout.com/p/assos-element-one-jacket

    I'll check some of site you all mention and really appreciate the help. Maybe I can save a few $$$ and stay away from the Assos, etc...

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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovetheewind View Post
    I always feel like I should answer every person that responds to my posts, especially when the responses are as helpful and well written as all of yours have been. THANK YOU ALL for the great tips.

    Don't laugh, but I had to look up Balaclava. When I was a kid, I lived in Vermont and delivered newspapers in -30 degree weather wearing what I called a ski mask...Lucky for me it really doesn't get cold in Virginia. (you've gotta chuckle seeing what people wear here in temps below 40....They look like they're ready for an Arctic adventure.

    I started with a jacket, hopefully not a mistake. I should have stopped here first.

    http://www.spadout.com/p/assos-element-one-jacket

    I'll check some of site you all mention and really appreciate the help. Maybe I can save a few $$$ and stay away from the Assos, etc...
    Yeah, Assos is sorta like the Lexus of automobiles - I'm sure they make nice stuff, but you can usually find something non-Assos for half as much money that's just as functional. It's like...a really really high end Lexus.

    Gore Bike Wear makes some nice stuff - they're kind of pricey sometimes...but not compared to Assos. However, when they're pricey you do get a nice product. They're the first place to look for "Windstopper" stuff. Craft and Endura also make some nice stuff. I have some stuff from Specialized myself.

  9. #9
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Do check out Sierra Trading Post ... and remember, when it comes to winter cycling gear, it doesn't have to be cycling specific.

    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/

    So, for example, I look up Women's baselayers ... and I find a nice-looking, long-sleeved partially merino wool top for $20
    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/2...For-Women.html

    And another nice-looking partially merino wool top for $30
    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/2...For-Women.html

  10. #10
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Everyone's reaction to cold is different so it's hard to tell you what would be best for you. You are also asking about a pretty wide range of temperatures. And the body's reaction to temperature isn't linear. What works at 55 F will probably be too cold at 35 and what works at 35 will probably be too hot at 45 F. It's a sliding scale and you'll need to determine what your own scale is.

    On to suggestions.

    Quote Originally Posted by ilovetheewind View Post
    What do I need?

    I've purchased Assos Element One jacket... and so far this is all I have.

    Do I need warmers?

    Gloves?

    Shoe covers?

    Base layers?

    Hat under helmet?

    tights?

    Budget is $500-750....I ride a road bike in Nortern Va with temps 35-55 degrees...Please help me build a winter bike wardrobe !
    Warmers: Nice when the temp is closer to 55. Much below that, however, and they don't do too much for you. Lower limit on them is around 50 for me. I'd say to save your money for something else.

    Gloves: This is one of those very personal things. I have hot sweaty hands and I can ride in long fingered mountain bike gloves (not insulation) down to 35 comfortably but other people can't. Even down to 20 F, I can use a very thin glove. I'd suggest not going with a bicycle specific glove, however. Even for me, I've never found one that works well. Get a good wind proof glove. REI, MEC, etc sells lots of them. I personally like the ones from Serius.

    Shoe covers: Below about 45 F these can mean the difference between a cold comfortable-ish ride and a cold miserable ride. Above 45, they're too hot. Performance has some that are cheap and very rugged. I'm going on 10 years with the current pair I have and they aren't showing any wear yet. A little gamey perhaps

    Base layers: This is where you should concentrate your money. You can use HelMart stuff if you like but avoid cotton. For me a base layer means long (over the knee) wool socks (check fly fishing vendors in the waders sections) and a long sleeve lightweight jersey (Performance sells some really cheap and inexpensive ones) over my regular bicycling clothes. I don't wear extra layers on my legs other than tights because I haven't found the need for the temperature range you are looking at. I probably wouldn't wear a long sleeve jersey for temps above 45 either...I'd just wear a wind jacket.

    If the temp goes below 30, I'll add another heavier long sleeve jersey over this one and maybe a set of thin bicycling socks under the wool ones. I don't add anything on my legs until well below 20 F.

    Hat under helmet: Another personal item. For several years now, I've used a Bell Metro helmet with a winter kit under it. The kit blocks the vents so that air flow is restricted. Really warms up the helmet. I just wear an ear warmer to keep my ears warm. It has to be really cold for me to need anything else. YMMV.

    Tights: The one item that I've found to be my best winter investment is a set of bib tights (Pearl Izumi Thermofleece). The bibs trap heat around my chest and they keep me warmer than waist high tights...and they're more comfortable Don't go for the Pearl Izumi Amfibs unless you are going to ride in very cold weather. Above 40 F they are just unbearably hot! They are more expensive too.

    With your budget, you should be able to get a pretty good kit for winter riding.
    Stuart Black
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
    Yeah, Assos is sorta like the Lexus of automobiles - I'm sure they make nice stuff, but you can usually find something non-Assos for half as much money that's just as functional. It's like...a really really high end Lexus.

    Gore Bike Wear makes some nice stuff - they're kind of pricey sometimes...but not compared to Assos. However, when they're pricey you do get a nice product. They're the first place to look for "Windstopper" stuff. Craft and Endura also make some nice stuff. I have some stuff from Specialized myself.

    Man, the Assos jacket I ordered arrived tonight and it fits like a glove. Feels great and I can wait to ride. (It's too warm)

    I think I'll save some money and stay away from Assos for base layers, but this jacket is quite impressive. I must admit I'm tempted to buy more from Assos. (Summer included)

    Thanks for the tips all. I'm cheking ebay now and sierra as mentioned....I'll be riding all winter thanks to your help !

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    I think you have made a good start. I would concentrate your money on three initial purchases. Jacket, which you have. Hopefully it is a little bit loose fitting so you can very layers under it for different temperatures. These can be cheap but wicking layers. Polypro or wool ski underwear work good for the top under the jacket. No point in spending lots of money on base layers. As long as they breath and wick they will work. You might even have stuff already that will work.

    The other things I would go for are a good pair of winter tights. I would buy two pair. A lighter weight pair and a mid weight pair. You probably will not need the really heavy type for your temps. Lightweight tights are not too expensive. 40-50 dollars. Mid weight ones are usually 60-80 bucks, USD. Unless you want Assos.

    Next, it's well worth it to buy some good winter cycling shoes. For most people the feet are the hardest things to keep warm below 45 F. You might also need to change pedal types for the winter. I don't recommend road type of winter shoes because if it does snow you can't walk on snow or ice with them and may fall on your face if you have to stop at an intersection. The mountain bike type are more useful for all around riding but they won't work with Look type clipless pedals. These are around 150-300 bucks.
    However, you may want to experiment with shoe covers. Some people can stay warm in them down to 35F. If you are one of these lucky ones you may not need winter cycling shoes for your area.

    Helmet cover and balaclava or skull cap are not too expensive. Make sure to get cycling specific ones or the material is too thick and generally too hot for cycling.

    Ski gloves with removable liners (to dry them out), work best for hands. Mittens if your hands have a hard time staying warm.
    Last edited by Hezz; 09-16-09 at 07:21 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hezz View Post
    I think you have made a good start. I would concentrate your money on three initial purchases. Jacket, which you have. Hopefully it is a little bit loose fitting so you can very layers under it for different temperatures. These can be cheap but wicking layers. Polypro or wool ski underwear work good for the top under the jacket. No point in spending lots of money on base layers. As long as they breath and wick they will work. You might even have stuff already that will work.

    The other things I would go for are a good pair of winter tights. I would buy two pair. A lighter weight pair and a mid weight pair. You probably will not need the really heavy type for your temps. Lightweight tights are not too expensive. 40-50 dollars. Mid weight ones are usually 60-80 bucks, USD. Unless you want Assos.

    Next, it's well worth it to buy some good winter cycling shoes. For most people the feet are the hardest things to keep warm below 45 F. You might also need to change pedal types for the winter. I don't recommend road type of winter shoes because if it does snow you can't walk on snow or ice with them and may fall on your face if you have to stop at an intersection. The mountain bike type are more useful for all around riding but they won't work with Look type clipless pedals. These are around 150-300 bucks.
    However, you may want to experiment with shoe covers. Some people can stay warm in them down to 35F. If you are one of these lucky ones you may not need winter cycling shoes for your area.

    Helmet cover and balaclava or skull cap are not too expensive. Make sure to get cycling specific ones or the material is too thick and generally too hot for cycling.

    Ski gloves with removable liners (to dry them out), work best for hands. Mittens if your hands have a hard time staying warm.


    Well after years on speedplay, I just switched to Look and LOVE them...So I'm stuck with look.

    I just bought Assos shoe covers and have a slightly oversize pair of specialized carbon shoes that I hope to wear winter socks with..Hopefully, winter socks and covers will do the job...I'd hate to buy new shoes.

    If I can keep the price down on base layers, I'd rather have many to cycle through the wash...If I can keep sweat out of the top layers, I dont mind keeping the quailty level high...(In other words, multiple cheap base layers can be washed/worn out----expensive top layers last longer)

    Ski gloves can be cheap---no problem there. And I'm from Vermont. I know how much warmer mittens are. Gloves should be fine in Va. Removable liners are a great tip.

    I'll start googling for balaclava's or skull caps....

    AS far as tights go, I'm still not sure exactly what they are...There are also many that mention leg warmers....I already own many pairs of shorts-------leg warmers would work nicely allowing my shorts to cycle through the wash. I ride 5 days a week and need five pairs of shorts.


    Thanks ! I'm starting to think winter riding may be better then summer....ITS WAY TOO HOT HERE IN VA AND SUMMER IS HELL !!!! It just never ocured to me to ride in winter.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovetheewind View Post
    AS far as tights go, I'm still not sure exactly what they are...There are also many that mention leg warmers....I already own many pairs of shorts-------leg warmers would work nicely allowing my shorts to cycle through the wash. I ride 5 days a week and need five pairs of shorts.
    Leg warmers



    Tights



    Bib tights



    I find that I can usually make it through a whole week on a single pair of tights...they doget a little gamey...if I have to. Bibs provide the best protection when the temperatures get lower than about 40 F.
    Stuart Black
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    Here is a picture of some bike tights. They come in types with a chamois and without. They are like form fitting pants. They are somewhat less expensive than bibs. Bibs are great for the really cold weather but are not necessary. However, some prefer them and find them more comfortable. I generally wear a normal pair of cycling shorts under my tights or bibs as this keeps the upper leg warmer without adding a second layer over the knee. So I buy the kind without the chamois.

    If you layer knee length wool socks under the tights or bibs it is good to keep the lower leg and foot warmer.

    You will probably have to experiment a little to find out what works best for you as most people are a little different in their insulation needs. I find it best to not wear extra layers under the tights or bibs as they bind the knee to some degree. But you can if it's really cold.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Thanks guys. I think I'll try warmers and see how far they go. I have a pair of summer bibs and HATE them. I like shorts better and already have many pairs...

    Thanks for the explanation and pics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovetheewind View Post
    Thanks guys. I think I'll try warmers and see how far they go. I have a pair of summer bibs and HATE them. I like shorts better and already have many pairs...

    Thanks for the explanation and pics.
    That is a good way to start off, because frankly, if you do a lot of winter riding you will need a few different combinations of things to wear on your legs depending on the temperature. And it is best to experiment with a few options as fall and winter come and it gets colder. Good luck out there on your cool weather rides.

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    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovetheewind View Post
    Thanks guys. I think I'll try warmers and see how far they go. I have a pair of summer bibs and HATE them. I like shorts better and already have many pairs...

    Thanks for the explanation and pics.
    Winter bibs are an entirely different beasty. I wear mine like overalls...shirt on the inside with a jacket covering the outer layer. They keep your chest warmer and trap heat with the jersey so you can ride in lower temperatures.

    Leg warmers really only work for moderate temperatures...45 to 60F...as something to cover your knees. You should cover your knees below ~60F because blood circulation is poor around that joint.
    Stuart Black
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    I'm...not 100% for sure. But I was under the impression that leg and arm warmers were really just for people who were going through noticeable temperature changes (biking before then after sunset? up and down a mountain?). They are useful because they can be taken on and off. But if you're going to have them on all the jacket, a full size shirt or jacket makes more sense.

    That's...just what I though they were used for. Not 100% sure.

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    I bought a pair of Assos Leg warmers, two pairs of Assos shoe covers and 4 base layers at Costco.... ($18 bucks each----two hard to refuse the cheap base layer)

    Its 80 degrees now and I wont get to test until the temp drops but I'm getting prepared.

    I'm not sure if the leeg warmers will stay up during rides. They are tight but seem to fall down at the thigh (I feel like a girl----whats next a garter belt?)

    Do leg warmers go inside or outside shorts?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovetheewind View Post
    Do leg warmers go inside or outside shorts?
    Some, in fact, probably most guys wear them under as the elastic of your cycling shorts can help hold them up. And some of the leg warmers have a rubberized gripper on them to help hold them up. It will probably grip better on your skin rather then the smooth material of the cycling shorts. Some wear them over. I think it is generally a matter of personal preference and how easy you need to remove them.

    The best use of leg warmers seems to be on early fall training rides were it can be cool in the morning and then get warm. Or for late evening rides were the opposite occurs. The leg warmers are easy to remove and then stuff in your jersey pockets.

    I don't see many racers using leg warmers though some do. Generally they seem to use lightweight tights under the normal shorts so the team logos can be seen. And to reduce the possibility of an equipment failure. Also, it might be dangerous or cause too much lost time to try and remove leg warmers while in a race. But if your training or recreational riding and can stop for a minute it is no big deal.
    Last edited by Hezz; 09-28-09 at 11:36 AM.

  22. #22
    Commuter Choccy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovetheewind View Post
    Man, the Assos jacket I ordered arrived tonight and it fits like a glove. Feels great and I can wait to ride. (It's too warm)

    I think I'll save some money and stay away from Assos for base layers, but this jacket is quite impressive. I must admit I'm tempted to buy more from Assos. (Summer included)

    Thanks for the tips all. I'm cheking ebay now and sierra as mentioned....I'll be riding all winter thanks to your help !
    I save money away each week for riding gear, and if like you I see something I like I'll buy it whether it's cheap or not. If it works and does what I want it to then it's good value to me.

    Like others have said Assos is the top dog but if you can afford it and like it then buy it.

    Getting a winter and summer set of clothes takes time because you need to learn what your body can handle temperature wise. This is my 6th winter of riding and I now have my clothing down to winter, spring, summer and autumn.

    You will find that you use certain companies over and over once you get a feel for their clothing.

    Good luck with the collection.

    Choccy...

  23. #23
    Senior Member Eclectus's Avatar
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    Accunulating a 4-season wardrobe is a matter of figuring out what your budget is at any point in time, and if you can afford more-durable stuff even at higher cost upfront, amortizing it over several years, or if cost is no object whatsoever, get anything that strikes your fancy and if the seams or materials give out after one season, get something else.

  24. #24
    Senior Member a1penguin's Avatar
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    I went shopping today for some layers. I live in Northern California where it doesn't get cold. But I'm always cold. I found that Marshalls has a great active wear second. I picked up a cold gear Under Amour shirt for $20! Got an Asics long sleeve for base layer for $13. Found two pair of Timberland socks with merino wool for $8. Then I hit the REI sale and got a thin fleece on sale for $30. I still need to find a cheap wind breaker. I'll be pants shopping tomorrow for something fleecy that will help keep the wind out. Still need gloves.

    It's pathetic that REI and Performance don't have the clothes in the store that they have online. I really have to try stuff on before buying. I wear sizes from M to XL. Along with some PI arm/leg warmers, I'll be quite toasty. I just can't see spending big money on cycling clothing when there are good, inexpensive alternatives out there. I might break down any buy an on sale thin bike windbreaker so I can get a bright limon color.

    So hit the Ross/TJ Maxx/Marshalls/Goodwill or whatever bargain basements you can find for decent warmer layers.
    Last edited by a1penguin; 10-11-09 at 02:59 AM.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by a1penguin View Post
    It's pathetic that REI and Performance don't have the clothes in the store that they have online. I really have to try stuff on before buying.

    Yes.... but you certainly must be aware that they will ship anything you order free to a local store. If it doesn't fit, just return it. If you're not sure of the size,color or whatever, order both.

    The stores can't carry everything, or else they would be triple in size.

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