Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Winter Jacket

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    8
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Winter Jacket

    I am looking at the Castelli Insolito Radiation Jacket. It's expensive, but I am prettty sensitive to cold and want to be able to ride ( in new England) in the winter. So it would be worth it to me if the jacket is singnificantly better for warmth. Has anyone tried this jacket who can comment on how well the heat reflecting liner works in cold weather?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,629
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Jacket warmth is a non issue since you will be varying the thickness of an underlaying insulation layer to adjust your level of warmth. The issues for the jacket are:

    Beathability/wind resistance - the more breathable the less wind resistant, the more wind resistant the more warm it will be to a point. So there is a delicate balance here to achieve.

    Loose fitting - A winter jacket that is snug fitting does not work well for really cold temperatures. It can work well in the fall in cool temperatures but needs some room for layering underneath.

    Quality of construction and material - this determines how long the garment will last and how it functions. But for the most part the material it is constructed of has the largest effect on how well in works.

    After looking at the Castelli jacket it looks pretty nice but I doubt that it is worth the price. For the metalized layer to work it needs to be very close to or next to the skin and layering anything under it will defeat the purpose of that layer. The metalized layer does not add as much warmth as insulation does. I seriously doubt that most riders would be comfortable in that jacket down to 25 degrees F. I think 45 -65 F would be a more realistic rating. If you have to wear insulation layers under it for it to be useful at 25 F the metalized layer will in all likelihood not breath well enough for the system to work well.

    This Castelli jacket would probably be great for cyclocross racing in wet conditions. In situations where you are going full bore and are generating a lot of heat and can't afford any extra weight it would probably be a good choice but for recreational riding or training of longer duration I don't think that it is a good choice.

    Money usually buys better fit and construction but not better warmth or flexibility. It would be better to buy two different 120 dollar jackets and one 60 dollar jacket than one 500 jacket. Because no matter how expensive a jacket is the material will determine the range it works in. It's better to have one hardshell jacket that is very wind resistant but somewhat breathable and one softshell jacket that is even more breathable and still water and wind resistant and one cheap windbreaker jacket that is very light and breathable. You will need different things for different conditions.
    Last edited by Hezz; 10-23-09 at 01:27 PM.

  3. #3
    Winter commuting mode Tequila Joe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Off the back
    My Bikes
    2007 Litespeed Vortex, 1970 Falcon Olympic, 2004 Specilized Enduro Expert, 2006 Langster, 2007 Opus Stella
    Posts
    2,743
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I researched the Castelli Insolito Radiation Jacket extensively last year when I was considering it. The jacket is more geared to be a roadie specific cycling jacket because it is cut to fit tight to reduce drag and is very light weight. It will keep a rider as warm any other cyling jacket that is rated to ~30 F but without the bulk of a thicker material or the need for a brushed fleace lining that many winter cycling jackets have.

    I was looking for a roadie jacket that I could also use for winter commuting in temperatures down to 0 F. I didn't get the Castelli jacket because since it is cut fairly tight, there was very little room to add any mid insulation layer without restricting movement. Also, the metalic radiation jacket didn't strike me as very breathable eventhough Castelli punched little holes throughout the material to allow moisture to disapate. I also felt that the $450 pricetag was over the top for what you get.

    Instead, I spent <$300 on a good Pearl Izumi winter cycling jacket, an Avia polypropel fleaced mid insulation layer and a Sugoi wind proof shell. With these 3 peices of clothing, I have clothing to suit a much wider rage of temperatures / conditions and when I wear all 3, with the wind shell on the outside, I can ride comfortably down to 0 F.

    T.J.
    Last edited by Tequila Joe; 10-23-09 at 02:57 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Eclectus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kansas
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpy, Schwinn 974
    Posts
    1,874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If it's Rosso Corsa line, it will be great quality. (mostly Gore Bike Wear and Assos, also Northface, Marmot Mountain Hardwear, DeMarchi, Craft.)

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    eldridge iowa
    My Bikes
    lynskey cross 29 er teesdale custom snow bike
    Posts
    201
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    foxwear

  6. #6
    Kid A TurbineBlade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Alexandria, VA
    Posts
    1,778
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I spent $25 on a quilted flannel jacket that works great for the cold with a simple t-shirt under it. Blue-collar and functional.

    I ditched my jerseys, polar fleece, polypro, wool, and all of that other crap a long time ago.
    Cyclist, angler and aquarist

  7. #7
    Senior Member riff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    TO
    Posts
    432
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I picked up the insolito from Wiggle when it was deeply discounted, and I think it's amazing. Wore it all winter, with the exception of very slushy days.

    I found that, despite its slim fit, I could get a long sleeved base layer, plus a long sleeve jersey on underneath, without difficulty. I never had to put more on than that, and we regularly hit temps in the minus 20's.

    I like its versatility: the liner can be removed, and the sleeves can be zipped off, so it functions as a three season jacket for me.

    It's been through the wash a few times now, and looks like new.

    I'm not sure if I would have sprung for it full price, but if you can find it on sale, go for it!

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Peru, IN
    Posts
    34
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I love mine....hate the layering I did w/o it...Crazy expensive though

  9. #9
    Senior Member OH~Treker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Bellevue, Ohio
    My Bikes
    Trek 720,820
    Posts
    73
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I wanted a Columbia Single Track Jacket for Christmas and got one. The jacket is a great weight for winter and is really good on the bike. It has "pit zips" to keep the core comfortable. I had it out in 20 mph wind @ 30 deg. on the bike Christmas day and it performed well. It's got that Omni Sheild protection also for when the wet comes. Might not be Road style but it's quality goods. Good luck.
    Don't point a finger....Lend a hand.

  10. #10
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    2,597
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Gene2308 View Post
    I spent $25 on a quilted flannel jacket that works great for the cold with a simple t-shirt under it. Blue-collar and functional.

    I ditched my jerseys, polar fleece, polypro, wool, and all of that other crap a long time ago.
    You don't have a pic/link, do you? I use Carhart clone heavy-shirt-type coats and they are the best. They cut wind and they are warm without roasting you. Down to freezing I just wear a wicking something underneath. 25 and below and I'll add a synthetic sweatshirt under the coat. I like blue-collar and functional.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    886
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    swrve milwaukee hoodie
    $150

  12. #12
    Single-serving poster electrik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    5,096
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would stay away from an all purpose jacket, such as a ski-jacket - they aren't designed usually for highly aerobic activities such as cycling. I would also stay away from that jacket made by castelli, i'm sure it is good as what it does but as a commuter you want a more versitile solution unless money isn't an issue.

    That solution is layers. Don't buy tight fitting stuff, except for your baselayers. For your baselayer i'd defiantly go merino wool, because synthetic fibres get funky and usually aren't as warm and contain a good dose of fire-retardants which aren't great for your health

    Anyway, just get something that can cut the wind out, the wind is usually the largest issue... so a fabric like Gore's windstopper makes a good choice since you're not too concerned about water-permeability as you are with breath-ability Pit zips and full front zipper are great also. No hoods. Long sleeves and back. Tapered seams.

    Windproof(0 CFM) over mid-layer over base-layer and you should end up far better solution than jacket over baselayer since you can customized how much insulation you'd like to wear for the midlayer!

  13. #13
    Senior Member scoatw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    central ohio
    My Bikes
    96 gary fisher 'utopia' : 99 Softride 'Norwester'(for sale), 1972 Raleigh Twenty. Surly 1x1 converted to 1x8, 96 Turner Burner
    Posts
    1,361
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use a Showers Pass rainjacket as my outer shell. I use a Sporthill Traveller jacket for my inner shell. My baselayer is just my regular workshirt and t-shirt. That works down to about 10f. Then I may add a long sleeve fleece shirt and/or a poly vest. But the Showers Pass protects me from the cold and wind. Excellent capabilities. I've ridden in many icestorms with that thing and came out every time as snug as a bug. The Sporthill cross country ski jacket I wear is light and coldproof. For the rest I wear Sporthill XC pants. That are probably ONE of the best winter cycling pants out there. They're good down to about 18f or so without having to add thermals . In the morning, below 35f, I put the XC pants over my work pants and that keeps me comfortable. They don't lose their shape and are totally coldproof and windproof. No matter what you pay for them you're getting a good deal. They'll last several years. In the afternoon ride home I just change into those and I have a nice comforable ride. On the feet I wear LL Bean Snow Sneakers with Performance toe warmers to block the wind and cold. They're good to about 10f or so. I'm still looking for a better boot to keep the toes warm below 0f.
    Last edited by scoatw; 12-28-09 at 03:28 PM.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hatfield (Western), MA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Sequoia Elite, Specialized Allez, Iron Mountain Adventure (Hybrid)
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Winter Jacket - Fit Considerations and Cycling Intensity?

    I'm new here and have been reading up on winter riding on this site for the last week or so, and still have some questions for the experts. I type quickly, so my apologies for the long post. I'll try to be briefer in the future.

    I am a new Diabetic since March of this year. Through nutritional improvements and cycling, I've lost 40 pounds in 2009. I also dropped two BP meds and two cholesterol meds, due to making so much progress. Presently at 205 (5'-8", muscular), I'd like to lose another 30 pounds in 2010. Therefore, trying to ride through the winter is important to me.

    I am making progress on my winter riding, but it still seems hit/miss with the cold. I have no nerve damage from the Diabetes, and my circulation is pretty good.

    In the Fall, I was overheating on some 45-50F rides, using a light Avalanche Wear jacket. It seemed like a great jacket, was light and windproof, but did not allow for moisture transmission enough. I recall stopping at 45-miles into a 58 mile ride (hybrid bike) and had to literally wring out my light merino wool mid-layer and the jacket. The top of my Oslo tights was soaked as well. Fortunately I had a dry back-up light merino wool sweater, and finished the ride.

    Discouraged, I broke down and purchased a Louis Garneau, Gemini 2 jacket. I compared the Massimo side-by-side to the Gemini and didn't think the Massimo was worth the extra coin. The front of the Gemini body and arms are windproof, while the back of the arms and about 80% of the back is breathable for moisture transmission. I had thought that this concept is similar to the Amfib lowers I use, which are great, and was optimistic.

    The problem is that the jacket has so much ventilation, that I almost always feel cold in it. Either that, or I'm just not dressing properly. For example, on a 25-30F ride (planned for 1.5 hours) I use a Smartwool base layer, and 1-2 light merino wool sweaters, and then the Gemini. I've read about having to be cold when you start, and from the air moving so well through this jacket, my core was indeed cold, starting out and through the ride. My hands/feet became cold within 45-minutes as well (Lake CXZ300 winter road shoes, REI Rainy Pass gloves, and LG balaclava).

    Upon return to the house, I checked my temperature by oral thermometer, and was down to 97F, which I figure was not serious, but not good either. I'm doing this to differentiate between perceived cold, and real cold.

    Question: Does anybody else check their core temperature when they get in?

    Since that last trip I have traded one of the light sweaters for a Columbia fleece vest, which has helped a bit.

    It seems that the vest "fills-in" the fit of the jacket and either reduces the air movement through the jacket or perhaps acts a little as a wind barrier. But when I got back, my base and mid-layer were wet as well. Frustration.

    Question: Does a winter jacket with ventilation like this need to fit tightly, like the Amfibs do on the lowers, in order to work properly? I can see how a tighter fit would reduce the ventilation. Or, would that tight fit reduce the insulating properties of the layers beneath? Could it be that this jacket has too much ventilation?

    I'm also going to throw a new angle in here, and that is the consideration of cycling intensity in the winter.

    I'm in pretty good aerobic shape now and ride a hybrid bike, averaging 15 mph on a 20-mile ride, with some hills. Heart rate runs in the 150-160 range, with peaks around 173 on hills and once in a while I'll cut back to 135 for 1-2 mile rest. That's a comfortable ride for me. Not exhausted afterwards, and not at all sore the next day.

    I spoke to someone yesterday who has been cycling for about 40-years, and he stated that I need to cut my intensity level, so that I don't sweat at all. He added that no clothing is going to keep you warm if you sweat in the winter.

    I understand his logic, but am frustrated by it, as I don't want to pull back so much, that I don't feel like I'm getting any exercise.

    Question: What considerations are given to this "intensity" aspect of winter cycling?

    I know that this is very a very individual issue, but can't help but think I'm missing something.

    Thanks in advance for any help and direction in this matter.

    Terry

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Northern NY...Brownville
    My Bikes
    Merlin Ti
    Posts
    1,786
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I love my Castelli soft/wind proof jacket. While a bit costly...$175...it is less expensive than some brands and with care will last a long time.
    I have an old Sugoi jacket...windproof front/sleeves...that is probably 15 years old. It still performs well in all but very cold conditions and is my cold weather running jacket. While it too was costly when purchased 15 years ago overall it is a very inexpensive per year cost.
    I'll be wearing it today when I go out running and it is currently -1f...
    I learned a long time ago it is better to buy quality and have it last and look good for a long time than buy something cheap that is also cheaply made and have it not fit well, not work well and not last...but it was cheap...you generally always get what you pay for.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Eclectus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kansas
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpy, Schwinn 974
    Posts
    1,874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For layering, use polypro (hollow core may be better than solid fiber) to pick up the water off your skin and transport it to a more hydrophilic layer. Merino and polyester fleece above the polypro both work well. Above that as temps drop, your choices are more woven wool or polyester and/or a wind-blocking shell.

    The Showers Pass Elite 2.0 is the most wide-ranging-conditions versatile jacket I have tried. I have an Assos airBlock 851, which is a beautiful jacket, fits like a glove due to stretchy material. Blocks rider-generated windchill in low-wind conditions. I love it in the 40s. Not able to block cold cross-winds, because windblocking panels are only on the front. It wasn't designed for Kansas winters, or even Swiss winters, where most people ski and pro cyclists head south and downhill to train.

    The 2.0 has one of the most breathable versions of Robert Gore's expired-patent expanded Polytetrafluorethylene (raw GTX precursor) membrane, called eVent. The vast majority of membrane/laminate products in bike and alpinewear have ePTFE, because no one has discovered a better waterpoof/windproof yet transpirable substance, and now it's dirt cheap, sans royalty payments to Gore & Associates.

    Every laminate or waterproof /windproof woven fabric with laminate or fiber coatings runs up against transpiration limits. A conventional jacket with single-action front zipper will cause sweat accumulation on your back, and if you ride long enough it will feel uncomfortably clammy, even if your core temp is reasonably maintained. By long enough, I mean 3-4-5 hours. Under 2 hours, you often won't notice it, except your underlayers will be wet when you take them off.

    Bulk airflow and sweat removal is essential to staying warm and dry in intense aerobic sports. This can be achieved with wind and water RESISTANT (not proof) woven fabrics, at the cost of restrictive multilayers in cold temps.

    The Showers Pass 2.0 represents very careful thinking and testing, and adoption of some alpine sports concepts. First, they put on a dual-action front zipper, allowing both top-down and bottom-up unzipping, and combinations thereof, which all the top-line alpine jackets have. Second, they put in pitzips, ala the better and best alpine jackets, which should be no-brainers for cycling shells, but oddly aren't standard. Thirdly, velcro tab wrist cuffs can be worn tight around or under gloves, or opened up as airflow scoops. Finally a back vent.

    This combination gives unmatched bulk-airflow and sweat removal, while still keeping you amazingly warm. You have to find your personal adjustment parameters, which will vary with temp and wind conditions, churning uphill, zipping downhill, cruising or hammering on the flats. The waterproof zips can be a bit balky requiring some stops or good no-hands riding to adjust on the fly, but all waterproof zips have this issue.

    This jacket proves it is possible to be warm and minimally damp, riding a long time. You can do what a lot of "experts" say is impossible: start out warm, rather than feel chilled when you get on the bike, then when you generate heat and feel the sweat starting, open zips and be warm but not overheated, not dripping wet, from start to finish.

    I've ridden in many GTX, Windstopper and Polartec jackets, as well as airBlock and other proprietary materials, softshell and hardshell. Cycling and alpine brands like Assos, Gore Bike Wear, Castelli, PI, Bellwether, Arc'Teryx, Marmot, Mountain Hardwear, The Northface and Swix. They all perform decently to excellently in specific condition ranges.

    The 2.0 has by far the widest varying-temps versatility I have encountered. It's not body-hugging, but the undershell space is the secret to good sweat-removing airflow. You won't feel like your wearing a tent, but it's not an aerodynamic racing shell. It's got a huge fanny pocket, enough to stash extra underlayers, some thick mitts, food, sat phone, whatever. A nice MP3 pocket with internal cord port.

    I can't guarantee you will find the 2.0 is the best jacket you've ever worn that can keep you comfy from peri-0F January blizzards to July showers, although it can.

    You be the judge. Get it from REI, try it all winter, spring, summer and next fall, and IF YOU DON'T LOVE IT, SEND IT BACK FOR A FULL REFUND. You don't have to claim a defect, you just have to say, it's not working for you. Doesn't matter if 99.9% of other buyers love theirs, REI, as a consumer-member owned co-op strives to satisfy buyers, and help mfrs develop improvements. If you join REI, for a one-time fee, I think its 20 bucks now, you get lifetime end-of-year dividends, usually 10%. You qualify for non-dividend-eligible 20% off members-only sales. This is a great deal.
    Last edited by Eclectus; 12-29-09 at 09:14 PM.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hatfield (Western), MA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Sequoia Elite, Specialized Allez, Iron Mountain Adventure (Hybrid)
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow. Great information Electus. Thank You.

    "polypro"? As in polypropelene as a base layer? Pardon my ignorance here. Do you have any recommendations, as I don't recall seeing any base layers in polypropelene, but I could be looking in the wrong places.

    Just Monday I saw some Solstice brand ski jackets, that had the pit-zips. That seemed like a great idea, but those jackets looked very heavy, like they'd be overkill.

    At this point, it has not been a financial constraint. Out of being tired of being cold, I ordered 5 Louis Garneau jackets, and told my shop that I would keep 2-3 of them, and send the others back. I wound up keeping the Gemini 2 and the Enerblock Nordic Running/Cycling jacket. I haven't tried the Enerblock yet, but expect similar results to the Gemini, as I can only regulate from the front zipper. But then again, if you feel fold throughout your ride, then you won't unzip for more ventillation anyway.

    On the Showers Pass Elite 2.0, is this jacket good for when it's just "dry" and cold?

    I'm already an REI member, and their return policy is great.

    Kind Regards

  18. #18
    Senior Member mudpuppy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    tip o' the mitt, MI, USA
    Posts
    63
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry_Zak View Post
    Wow. Great information Electus. Thank You.

    "polypro"? As in polypropelene as a base layer? Pardon my ignorance here. Do you have any recommendations, as I don't recall seeing any base layers in polypropelene, but I could be looking in the wrong places. ...
    This stuff is great.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Eclectus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kansas
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpy, Schwinn 974
    Posts
    1,874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes polypropylene. This is basically a plastic, with similarities to polyethylene. It's actually hydrophobic, for example water beads up on sheet polypro. In woven form, particularly hollow-core, it acts as a nice sweat transport/conduit agent, to deposit water on hydrophilic outer layers. For example if you wear it with merino, under a non-breathable shell for an intense or prolonged ride, and you remove your clothes, you will notice the merino is heavy and wet, the polypro is minimally damp. Hang them up indoors for 4 hours, the merino is still heavy, the polypro is completely dry. UnderArmour is polypro. It's widely available from many mfrs. I have mostly Cabelas. I have one interesting Heli-Hansen dual-material jersey, hollowcore polypro skin layer woven with a merino outer layer using this hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic-water-transport concept.

    https://www.hellyhansengear.com/p-63...ip-turtle.aspx

    Polyester absorbs less water than wool, wool less water than cotton.

    I tend to wear polyester more than wool. The polypro gets stinky and makes the wool stinky. To avoid this, you have to go all-wool. But wool gets too unpleasantly clammy next to my skin. It's a personal preference. If wool-only riders are comfy, they're the best judges of what makes them comfy.

    The trick is to get the sweat water to evaporate while still feeling warm. Evaporation per se imposes a high heat-loss. (Chem 101).

    One extreme is to wear open-weave layers with maximal evaporation, and be cold (which then reduces sweat production), The other is to be totally enclosed, sweating with no evaporation and getting very wet, and experiencing a high core temp that the body cannot prevent because its homestatic mechanisms are defeated. Trying to find a middle-zone is what modern winter sports apparel, wicking layers, breathable but windproof / water resistant or waterprof out layers are about.

    The Showers Pass 2.0 is waterproof. It was / is designed primarily to be a rainjacket. But it's excellent for cold-dry conditions too.

    I've ridden with a lot of jackets. This one comes out as, "Wow, this is AMAZING. I'm gettin hot, let me open some zips. I'm feelin a bit chilled, let me close some zips a tad."

    If you read some reviews, they're "eVent is so much more breathable than Gore-Tex." Except, their GTX comparisons don't have bottom-opening zips, plus a backvent. Often not even pitzips. The undershell-airflow adjustability of this jacket is what sets a new benchmark. If you totally zip it closed, and ride hard you will overload the eVent. If somebody makes a GTX Paclite or Performance shell with 2.0's multi-zip design, it will get raves. So far, nobody has done this.

    My only rain ride so far was cold rain turning to sleet, then followed by snow. Early on, no rain came through the jacket. I got home covered in frost and ice pellets after 2.5 hours. My bike derailleurs locked up from road slush that turned solid in the mechanisms, and I was doing some unsettling sliding on ice. But I was totally comfy.

    Otherwise, I've been doing 23-52 F dry windy Great Plains winter days, and I love the 2.0s wind-chill-eliminating capability.

    Don't believe me, but if you get one at REI, test it against what you already have, wear it in widely-varying conditions, and don't feel it is really great, you can return it and get a refund. Trash it to your friends and in the blogosphere. If you find it is a fantastic jacket, be an evangelist and spread the good word.
    Last edited by Eclectus; 12-30-09 at 04:41 PM.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hatfield (Western), MA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Sequoia Elite, Specialized Allez, Iron Mountain Adventure (Hybrid)
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you again for your time Eclectus, and the technically supported response. Something I can relate to.

    Looks like I'll be headed to my REI next week when I'm back to work for the 2.0.

    I have tried an UnderArmour "Cold Gear - Metal" base layer,

    http://www.underarmour.com/shop/us/e...ck/1000592-001

    and it seemed like it was soaked when I got in. Could it be that the light merino sweater over it, and jacket were not tight enough to keep in contact with the UA baselayer, to allow the moisture to get pulled away?

    I feel like such a fledgling!!

    Thanks Again.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Eclectus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kansas
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpy, Schwinn 974
    Posts
    1,874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It sounds like you overloaded your kit's ability to remove water. It happens. Merino or polyester that gets saturated will stop polypro from transferring water, so you get wet. And if you ride long enough, you will feel clammy.

    SP 2.0 works because it redirects wind into a body-tangential airflow, versus cold air penetrating to your skin cold airflow with woven non-windproof materials, or no underflow with windproof body-hugging jacket's fabric/membrane's vapor-transpiration capacity being overloaded.

    I have tight softshells that get vapor-overloaded, worse if they don't have pitzips. I have an alpine parka, Marmot Exum GTX Pro, with great undarshell airflow, but designed to accommodate many layers, including a down jacket, it's tenty. SP 2.0 has the airflow with a decent riding cut.

    You can probably size one tightish, which will impair its under-shell airflow and put more transpiration load on the eVent membrane. But at REI, if you do this, and feel wet, you can upsize it and try that. Try the options.

    I have a Marmot Exum GTX Pro shell that is very versatile. Being made to accommodate multilayers including a down jacket, it's tenty. But it rides dry, with zips adjusted (no back vent). I like the SP 2.0 better on the bike.

    I like heavy-thickness Cabelas polypro and REI polyester.

    Wool is very good. If it isn't next to your skin, or you're hardy like me, it doesn't have to be merino. I've worn Irish oiled wool "naked". I used to live in Pendletonland.

    I like polyester for its throw-it-in the washer and dryer convenience, it's quicker-drying hang-up property. It also wicks sweat away faster than wool.
    .
    It's fun to try different things and see what you like. All the alpine sports mfrs are selling wool now, but they're not dropping polyester either.
    They're working with silver ino and bamboo to deal with stinkiness.

    Going to REI, the SP 2.0 doesn't have to work for you. You can get your money back and resume your search for something that meets your needs. The odds are your search will be ended, if you want a wide-variation-weather jacket for 6, 8, 10 months of the year, but if it isn't that good for you, you're not out 200 bucks.

    You will have to spend some time learning to tweak all the zips, but you'll dial it in pretty quickly.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •