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  1. #26
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    i would never want to clean my bike in the shower because i would not want to have to clean the mess it would make. the closest my bike gets to being washed is me parking it in a snowbank and the snow starting to melt.

  2. #27
    tsl
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazzywolfie View Post
    i would never want to clean my bike in the shower because i would not want to have to clean the mess it would make.
    What mess? The dirt off the bike runs down the drain just the same as the dirt, hair and whatever that comes off me. The only time you can tell I've washed a bike in the shower is when the shower already has a coating of soap scum and the dirt sticks to the soap scum.

    Anyway, I have only one choice: Mop the slush off the living room floor, or rinse it down the shower drain. I'll choose shower drain, thanks.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  3. #28
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monkey Face View Post
    We do have salt over here, but it's reassuring to hear from clx1, who's basically articulated what I kind of suspected.
    Don't be reassured, he's mistaken. Salt is the killer but the crud from winter roads also gets ground into a fine paste that does very little good to your drivetrain, even here in the UK. If you really are conscientious enough to clean your bike thoroughly after every ride, the additional wear will be limited. Very few people are, however; especially not those of us who use a bike twice every working day to commute.

    I agree (GriddleCakes) - over here it seems more like an excuse to buy another bike rather than a necessity. In which case I think I need a singlespeed!
    This isn't a joke. A fixie/singlespeed is pretty much the ideal winter bike over here. Nothing in the way of expensive cassettes and derailleurs to chew up - and no need to use a rear brake, which even saves one of your rims!
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  4. #29
    Senior Member CharlieFree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheik_Yerbouti View Post
    The mixed blessing about Calgary is the chinook. It's wonderful when it melts the snow and drys out the roads, and you can ride your road bike in warm clothing and enjoy a sunny day. It sucks when all it does is turn the snow to ice before a re-freeze - the most fun you can have on two wheels
    Very true. The melt/freeze cycle inevitably produces ice. I like to use studded tires to be safe.

  5. #30
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    This is directed for TSL............If you don't mind me asking.............What is the story behind all of those locks on your bikes?

  6. #31
    Dances With Cars TRaffic Jammer's Avatar
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    To prevent a B&E runaway with all his bikes

  7. #32
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    I never thought about locking my bike up inside my house ............... until now.

  8. #33
    Senior Member Absenth's Avatar
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    I live in Indiana, but grew up in Wisconsin. I actually think I'd be better off winter commuting back in Wisconsin. At least they get the roads cleaned up pretty quickly. The ride from where I live, out into the country town I work in is going to be pretty brutal.

    I'm going to try it with the Surly as is, but I imagine I'll end up with studded tires before long, and lusting after a bike with an IGH.
    2010 Surly Long Haul Trucker -- Blue Velvet
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  9. #34
    Single-serving poster electrik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Riding View Post
    I never thought about locking my bike up inside my house ............... until now.
    You should, most renters insurance or home insurance won't cover more than one bicycle - and not for very much at that either.

  10. #35
    tsl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Riding View Post
    This is directed for TSL............If you don't mind me asking.............What is the story behind all of those locks on your bikes?
    There are 46 units in my building. I don't get to pick my neighbors, or their deadbeat boyfriends. I don't get to pick who the landlord hires, or who his contractors hire.

    The only time I had a bike stolen was from the locked storage bin (concrete block walls, solid wood door) in the locked basement of the locked building where I used to live. I had thought about locking that bike to a drain pipe in the storage bin, but figured that would be an early sign of paranoia. Anyway, it was definitely an inside job. I suspect my neighbor, the landlord suspected the painters.

    Who knows how many copies of the building key and my apartment key are out there, and how secure any of them are. The only locks I control are the bike locks. Thus, no bike is ever left home alone and unlocked.

    I'm also car-free. So if my bikes are stolen, I'm SOL. Imagine if all your transport was stolen all at once…

    Funny how no one ever asks why people hit the little lock and alarm button on their cars when they park in their own garage. But lock a bike inside, and it's question time.
    Last edited by tsl; 09-01-10 at 09:31 PM.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  11. #36
    tsl
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrik View Post
    You should, most renters insurance or home insurance won't cover more than one bicycle - and not for very much at that either.
    Depends on the country, province or state, and the company.

    Here in New York State, all my bikes are covered at full replacement cost, with no extra rider or schedule on my insurance through Amica Mutual. My old insurance company, State Farm, covered all bikes to only $500, period--no riders or schedules available. My deductible was also $500, so essentially, the bikes were uninsured. Found that out the hard way, see post above.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  12. #37
    Senior Member trustnoone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post


    It's not so much that I'm a clean bike freak, but that the only place I have to store my bikes is the living room...

    ...and I do so dislike slush on the hardwood floor.
    I love the living room

  13. #38
    Senior Member wolfchild's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post
    There are 46 units in my building. I don't get to pick my neighbors, or their deadbeat boyfriends. I don't get to pick who the landlord hires, or who his contractors hire.

    Funny how no one ever asks why people hit the little lock and alarm button on their cars when they park in their own garage. But lock a bike inside, and it's question time.
    Hey TSL I agree with you 100%. I also live in a one bedroom highrise apt. Personal security is very important to me and I always keep my bikes locked up. I have three bikes . Whenever one of them gets used , the other two stay locked together. I have a little storage room inside my apt and I keep my bikes locked inside there, they all locked together to a solid object with a bunch of u locks and a chain.

  14. #39
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    I'm a UK resident, and either the original poster is just winding people up, or chester miraculously missed all the snow and ice last winter. OK, that was exceptional, but we did have weeks at a time of ice on the roads for most of the day. Normal winters in the north of england commonly present riders with black ice.

    Road salt is heavily used here, mixed with grit. It wears out drivechains very quickly.

    I didn't have a winter bike last winter, just used my normal road bike, at times riding on snow/ice for 25miles to work. One of the biggest problems was snow/ice build up on the tyres, jamming between tyre and frame. A winter bike with big frame clearances would have avoided that problem. This year I'm planning on having an old mtb ready with at least 2" clearances, Continental Top Contact Winter tyres (the ones with granules in the rubber) and a rear wheel with a fix cog one side, freewheel the other.

  15. #40
    Senior Member trustnoone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clx1 View Post
    It's absolute tosh when people say riding in bad weather ruins your bike, I ride every week of the year(except for holidays and snow) on a carbon bike with decent wheels and 23mm tyres.
    When I lived in Vancouver I rode about 1200 days straight on 23mm tires before I took a snow day.

    23mm tires reduce riding months to about 5 on the prairie. See enclosed April weather:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #41
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    someone say Winnipeg

  17. #42
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bain19 View Post
    someone say Winnipeg
    I already did... gotta give those guys props for riding in the weather they have.

    Am pondering going back to using a three speed as a winter bike... did that for a season and really liked the way the hub and gears were unaffected by the coldest of temperatures.

    Having a really low gear for slogging through the snow is a good thing too.

  18. #43
    12mph+ commuter
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    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post


    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    It's not so much that I'm a clean bike freak, but that the only place I have to store my bikes is the living room...
    [IMG][/IMG]
    ...and I do so dislike slush on the hardwood floor.

    In any event, three years of winters on this bike with no adverse effects, other than expected chain wear.
    Do you ride studs in the winter? Does that scratch up your shower at all? Your idea tempts me; my winter bike was totally thrashed after a winter of sand and salt in Minnesota.

  19. #44
    Senior Member Monkey Face's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairytoes View Post
    I'm a UK resident, and either the original poster is just winding people up, or chester miraculously missed all the snow and ice last winter.
    We normally do miss out on snow here - either Snowdonia gets it first, or the Pennines/Peaks - but we did get some this winter; the first real snow here since 1986 if memory serves me right.

    I can see, if you really have to use your bike every day, the need for a bike with some tyre/mudguard clearance, but it's the recreational riders, on crappy old bikes that can't be much fun to ride, that make me wonder 'why?'

    Anyway chaps, you've enlightened me... at least to the extent that I'm picking up my first 'winter' single-speed tomorrow!

  20. #45
    tsl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scheherezade View Post
    Do you ride studs in the winter? Does that scratch up your shower at all?
    Yes. No.

    You'll notice in the first photo that the hook's backing plate keeps the tire off the wall. It gets scratched up a bit from sliding the bike sideways on to the hook. While the rear tire does directly contact the tile, I'm careful and don't let the bike swing back and forth, and when I need to spin the tire, I pull it back off the wall first.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monkey Face View Post
    We normally do miss out on snow here - either Snowdonia gets it first, or the Pennines/Peaks - but we did get some this winter; the first real snow here since 1986 if memory serves me right.

    I can see, if you really have to use your bike every day, the need for a bike with some tyre/mudguard clearance, but it's the recreational riders, on crappy old bikes that can't be much fun to ride, that make me wonder 'why?'

    Anyway chaps, you've enlightened me... at least to the extent that I'm picking up my first 'winter' single-speed tomorrow!
    In the past 5 winters I lived 7 miles from a train station and 25 miles from work. The first 2.5miles was on a country road that had black ice at least 2 months of the year. I really really regretted not getting my act together and getting a bike sorted with studded tyres. One memorable morning I had 5 falls in the first 2 miles - and two more in the next 5. All I was trying to do was to get to the train station!
    The grit and mud meant I went through 2 chains in winter alone.
    If I'd sorted a fat tyre winter bike, I could have ridden 5 miles on frosted/snowy bridlepaths instead of an icy road. Oh, this is in Yorkshire, btw.

  22. #47
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    Winter bike = summer bike.

    Just sayin'

  23. #48
    Junior Member Coupon's Avatar
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    ice is ice no matter how bad your winters are

  24. #49
    Senior Member CharlieFree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post

    Having a really low gear for slogging through the snow is a good thing too.
    Speaking of which, I am converting my winter bike to single speed. My road bike has a 42t/16t combination which works well for me in summer with my terrain, but I would think I need to gear it lower for snow/ice. If I use a 42t chainring on the front, should I go 17 or 18 or even higher? Also I'll likely be using platforms not clipless for this bike. Any experience with this?

  25. #50
    Senior Member Fynn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monkey Face View Post
    , so I want to go ride through wind and rain and save the turbo trainer for when it's icy.


    Thanks.
    Wow, that is just the opposite for me. With studded tires ice isn't a problem at all. However, wet windy freezing cold conditions are to be avoided and that is what i do. Even the road is less desirable when temps are above freezing. I much prefer a hard pack frozen surface to a slushy wet one. Regardless, back to the question at hand...do you need a "winter bike?" It appears that is ultimately up to you. I usually set up a couple different bikes for winter mainly because I have them configured differently. One has platform pedals with very aggressive studs while the other has clipless pedals with less agressive studs. Then i just ride my regular bike when road conditions don't require studs.

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