Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 46 of 46
  1. #26
    Daily Rider hairlessbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    My Bikes
    89 Bridgestone MB-3, 93 Bridgestone RB-1,93 Bridgestone MB-1, 95 Klein Fervor, 02 BikeE AT, 06 Surly Cross-check, 8? Schwinn Frontier
    Posts
    638
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jaidog View Post
    Thanks for all the great suggestions and replies. I have started to log what I am wearing everyday I ride along with weather conditions. What I've found so far is that if the temp is above 65 and it's not dark, I'm comfortable with bike shorts and a poly T-shirt. At 55-65, bike shorts, poly T-shirt with a poly jersey on top works well. Between 45-55, I tried UnderArmour coldgear longsleeve jersey with a poly jersey on top and bike shorts. With this gear, I'm comfortably cool during my entire ride and don't work up much of a sweat.

    I'm in the Chicago area and the ground is still warm. I haven't had to ride in sub-45 degree weather, yet. Based on the posts above, I am planning on purchasing a Bellwether Coldfront jacket and will use this along with my UnderArmour jersey for 35-45 degree rides. I'll add leg warmers, as well.
    Haven't tried it yet but you could go with the windproof base layer shirts from Castelli:

    http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=C2355

  2. #27
    No fashion sense cyclist IR Baboon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Near Port Angeles, WA
    My Bikes
    Surly LHT
    Posts
    104
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, I'm still wearing shorts and a windbreaker until temps drop to 32F. Its highly variable from person to person.

    The log thing is the best suggestion here. A month of uncomfortable experimentation will yield years of comfortable winter riding.

  3. #28
    Member jaidog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OP here again. Wanted to provide an update. Bellwether Coldfront fell through, but I found a Gore Performance Shell at a clearance price of $50 which I couldn't pass up. So, I'm now waiting for temps to drop to mid-30s at which time I'll try my UnderArmour coldgear jersey with the Gore Shell. I have a feeling I'll require even one more layer since the Gore Shell has very little insulation, but I'll need to wait for lower temps before I know for sure. Will provide results soon -- hopefully not too soon since I'm perfectly fine with 60 degrees in October.

  4. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Texas
    My Bikes
    Walmart mountain bikes. Its all about my muscles.
    Posts
    33
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow. 35 to 55 is not considered that cold? Can you operate at VO2 max in those temperatures? Is your maximal power less under these conditions?

  5. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Toronto, ON, Canada
    Posts
    409
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AaronTX View Post
    Wow. 35 to 55 is not considered that cold? Can you operate at VO2 max in those temperatures? Is your maximal power less under these conditions?
    You will find that you can push yourself until drenched in sweat in colder temperatures than that. The maximal power you can generate is probably not a problem, but the colder it gets the less useful power yield you get, as you wear more layers of clothes, adopt a less aerodynamic position, and heavier/"draggier" bike accessories.
    بیژن
    --
    semper ubi sub ubi

  6. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Toronto, ON, Canada
    Posts
    409
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AaronTX View Post
    Wow. 35 to 55 is not considered that cold? Can you operate at VO2 max in those temperatures? Is your maximal power less under these conditions?
    Quote Originally Posted by bijan View Post
    You will find that you can push yourself until drenched in sweat in colder temperatures than that. The maximal power you can generate is probably not a problem, but the colder it gets the less useful power yield you get, as you wear more layers of clothes, adopt a less aerodynamic position, and heavier/"draggier" bike accessories.
    Actually if anything power output might go up if it weren't for dealing with snow/ice/wind. So a stationary bike protected from wind, but kept at lower temperature would probably result in better output as the person pedaling wouldn't overheat as easily. It would actually be interesting to see what the optimum ambient temperature would be.

    Probably part of the reason why marathon season is in the fall...
    بیژن
    --
    semper ubi sub ubi

  7. #32
    Member jaidog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jaidog View Post
    OP here again. Wanted to provide an update. Bellwether Coldfront fell through, but I found a Gore Performance Shell at a clearance price of $50 which I couldn't pass up. So, I'm now waiting for temps to drop to mid-30s at which time I'll try my UnderArmour coldgear jersey with the Gore Shell. I have a feeling I'll require even one more layer since the Gore Shell has very little insulation, but I'll need to wait for lower temps before I know for sure. Will provide results soon -- hopefully not too soon since I'm perfectly fine with 60 degrees in October.
    Well, temps haven't dropped into the 30's yet, but windchills have. Today, it was 44 degrees with 20mph winds, yielding a windchill of 36. I wore an UnderArmour coldgear jersey, longsleeve poly midweight jersey, and the Gore Shell. Mixed reviews -- I was definitely warm, but maybe a bit too warm. The UnderArmour was fairly sweaty at the end of my commute. Almost feels like the Gore Shell is trapping a lot of heat which is good and bad. I'll need to experiment with different base layers or less base layers to get the right combination. Definitely think the Gore Shell will be enough to keep me warm down to 35 with one or two base layers.

  8. #33
    Member jaidog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just in case anyone is still monitoring this old thread ... Original OP back. Rode in 40 degree weather tonight through a surprise unforecasted downpour. My toes were frozen by the time I arrived home, but my core was warm AND DRY. Not a single drop made it through the Gore Shell!! And, I've found that the UnderArmour coldgear jersey was just trapping in too much heat or was too warm. With two long-sleeve polyester layers underneath the Gore Shell, I'm toasty at 40 degrees (and dry as I found out tonight). Needless to say, I'm extremely happy with the Shell and the layers I'm using under it for my semi-cold rides.

  9. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jaidog View Post
    Just in case anyone is still monitoring this old thread ... Original OP back. Rode in 40 degree weather tonight through a surprise unforecasted downpour. My toes were frozen by the time I arrived home, but my core was warm AND DRY. Not a single drop made it through the Gore Shell!! And, I've found that the UnderArmour coldgear jersey was just trapping in too much heat or was too warm. With two long-sleeve polyester layers underneath the Gore Shell, I'm toasty at 40 degrees (and dry as I found out tonight). Needless to say, I'm extremely happy with the Shell and the layers I'm using under it for my semi-cold rides.
    That's good to hear. Now you'll have to work on the toes.

  10. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hairlessbill View Post
    Haven't tried it yet but you could go with the windproof base layer shirts from Castelli:

    http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=C2355
    In my experience the last thing you would want is a windproof base layer. The problem is that windproofness is directly opposed to breathability and the inner layers need to be as breathable as possible. The only place you want windproofness is on the outer layer. In order for things to wick vapor they need to be as breathable as possible. With the outer layer you have to strike a compromise to keep a certain amount of cold air out of the warm body layer. But it has to breath enough to let out some body vapor.

  11. #36
    Member jaidog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Regarding the cold toes: I don't plan on riding in the rain often, so I'll keep a couple of plastic bags with me and insert those between my socks and shoes. Dry toes = warmer toes, I hope.

    Regarding layering: After experimenting for the past month in conditions ranging from 40 degrees to 70 degrees, I've concluded that there are two ways for me to layer. The first involves two to three layers of polyester with none of it being windproof. This seems to work down to about 48 degrees. With this approach, my core is not toasty, but I arrive less sweaty and feel that any sweat I'm producing has a chance to evaporate. I feel a lot more wind on my core, and I think the wind is helping remove the sweat (and heat). The second method of layering is to use one or two base layers with my Gore Shell on top. This seems to work well in sub-48 degree temps, especially at night. This keeps my core much warmer probably due to the fact that I am protected from wind, and the heat from my body is trapped within the shell. The flipside is that my base layers are more sweaty, but not too bad as long as I layer appropriately.

  12. #37
    Senior Member digibud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Further North than U
    My Bikes
    Spec Roubaix, three Fisher Montare, two Pugs
    Posts
    1,496
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I generally agree with jaidog but I would add that you can find jackets that are windproof on the front and not on the back. That allows moisture to escape from the back. When it's below freezing and my wife and I ride it's not uncommon to stop and brush off the frozen moisture off the back of our jackets. Even using the lightest weight windproof (back and front) jacket causes a lot of moisture to remain trapped inside. I also prefer more layers of polyester and hold off any windproofing layer till I really need it.

  13. #38
    Member jaidog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by digibud View Post
    I generally agree with jaidog but I would add that you can find jackets that are windproof on the front and not on the back. That allows moisture to escape from the back. When it's below freezing and my wife and I ride it's not uncommon to stop and brush off the frozen moisture off the back of our jackets. Even using the lightest weight windproof (back and front) jacket causes a lot of moisture to remain trapped inside. I also prefer more layers of polyester and hold off any windproofing layer till I really need it.
    I think the Bellwether Coldfront jacket I was thinking about getting was windproof on front and not on the back. Would be nice to try that out and compare it to the Gore Shell I ended up with. But, as long as I don't go too heavy underneath the Gore Shell, I seem to be okay. It also has a horizontal zippered vent in the back that I've opened midway through rides where I'm heating up. And, my ride is only an hour each way with showers available in both directions. So, if I work up a little too much sweat, it's not a big deal. Also, as I found out first-hand, the Gore Shell is very waterproof, and I don't think the Coldfront is, making the Gore Shell somewhat more versatile.

  14. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not sure what shell you have, but a few are designed so that their pockets double as vents. If you're still having evaporation issues that might be worth a shot.

    Hope you're enjoying the warm weather--40's here this morning.

  15. #40
    Member jaidog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ScottRock View Post
    Not sure what shell you have, but a few are designed so that their pockets double as vents. If you're still having evaporation issues that might be worth a shot.

    Hope you're enjoying the warm weather--40's here this morning.
    The shell I have has only one pocket and it is in the back. As you stated, this pocket doubles as a vent, and I am opening it more often now that I'm building up some heat. I suppose it helps, but a jacket that is breathable across the entire backside would be better at releasing heat. Little odd that my shell has just this single pocket. I would have expected more.

  16. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jaidog View Post
    Little odd that my shell has just this single pocket. I would have expected more.
    That is weird, but i guess that's what you get for $50 gore.

  17. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Jackets typically have fewer pockets than jerseys. Usually one in the rear. Some have side pockets or a chest pocket. If you need to carry more stuff you can use a winter weight long sleeve cycling jersey as a middle layer. The jacket will need to be a little loose for this.

  18. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    My Bikes
    '07 Trek 1500, '08 Surly Cross Check, '09 Masi Speciale Sprint custom build
    Posts
    4,568
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd do the jersey and a fitting shell. You can unzip the shell as you get hot.

    Or get a nice base layer, and wear a summer jersey over it and use a shell. I'm a big fan of wind blocking layers. I also tend to get cold rather than hot, so....

  19. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    My Bikes
    '07 Trek 1500, '08 Surly Cross Check, '09 Masi Speciale Sprint custom build
    Posts
    4,568
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ScottRock View Post
    That is weird, but i guess that's what you get for $50 gore.
    My Capo shell as no pockets. You use your jersey pockets and skip them on the shell so it can be as light and foldable as posible.

  20. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    My Bikes
    '07 Trek 1500, '08 Surly Cross Check, '09 Masi Speciale Sprint custom build
    Posts
    4,568
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Hezz View Post
    In my experience the last thing you would want is a windproof base layer. The problem is that windproofness is directly opposed to breathability and the inner layers need to be as breathable as possible. The only place you want windproofness is on the outer layer. In order for things to wick vapor they need to be as breathable as possible. With the outer layer you have to strike a compromise to keep a certain amount of cold air out of the warm body layer. But it has to breath enough to let out some body vapor.
    I would agree. Wind proofing is the last layer.

  21. #46
    Dough Mestique
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    349
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AaronTX View Post
    Wow. 35 to 55 is not considered that cold? Can you operate at VO2 max in those temperatures? Is your maximal power less under these conditions?
    According to my personal experience, power and speed start to fall off at around 45-50 degrees. At around 25 degrees F, I notice my pedal stroke becomes less smooth, whether from the abundant clothing or something else (frozen brain stem?) I am not sure, but my legs definitely feel clunkier. Power continues to slowly fall off as temps drop till someplace in the lower single digits (F) when it starts to hurt to breath. That's the coldest I have ridden. To me, 15F or below is cold.

    BL


    www.lanterne-rouge-bikeworks.com

    "Next time, I will not make the same mistake twice!"

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •