Bike Forums

Bike Forums (http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Winter Cycling (http://www.bikeforums.net/winter-cycling/)
-   -   Boots for cycling in the winter (http://www.bikeforums.net/winter-cycling/694728-boots-cycling-winter.html)

gholt 11-12-10 01:17 PM

Boots for cycling in the winter
 
I saw that REI was doing a good sale on their boots and was wondering what boot(s) would make winter cycling better on the feet if going to a flat petal and winter boot;

http://www.rei.com/outlet/search?ran...AMen%27s+Boots

Any suggestions

Captain Blight 11-12-10 03:03 PM

Gore-Tex or similar vapor-permeable membrane waterproofing; Thinsulate or Quallofil or the like for insulation. Not too, too aggressive a tread, you don't want your feet to 'default' to an uncomfortable spot on the pedals though you might get lucky. Mid-height; too tall an upper feels really funny, and too low admits cold and snow. The Hi-Tec boots look to be a good buy.

Hezz 11-12-10 05:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gholt (Post 11777907)
I saw that REI was doing a good sale on their boots and was wondering what boot(s) would make winter cycling better on the feet if going to a flat petal and winter boot;

http://www.rei.com/outlet/search?ran...AMen%27s+Boots

Any suggestions

The best non cycling specific boots for use with platform pedals are the ultra lightweight mountaineering boots. They are pretty expensive though. The reason they are so good is because they have a stiff sole made to use with crampons. They often are not insulated but are still very warm for street use with a thick wool sock. As long as you get an extra size bigger. The only problem is that they are more expensive as winter cycling boots. Generally around 200 dollars or more. Sometimes you can find a well built lightweight hiker that has a stiff sole. These make really good cycling boots. Unfortunately, the less expensive boots are not as good but can still be made to work with a large area platform pedal.

The High Teks are light and warm but have too thin of a sole. I have a pair of those. They are pretty good winter street shoes. Will work but not the best. I would be more inclined to try the Merrell Encore Trek boots since it most likely has a stiffer and more rugged sole than the Hi Tek.

The Bearpaw Alta would probably be the most waterproof (with treatment) due to it's upper construction. Can't say anything about the sole though, which is the most important part for any kind of longer distance bike rides.

These would be the ultimate non cycling specific boots to have for winter bike riding on platform pedals. KInd of expensive though.

http://www.rei.com/product/721444?pr...:referralID=NA

swwhite 11-14-10 09:20 PM

When I started riding in winter, I made it a game to go cheap ("I don't need no stinkin' high-end gear.") So I bought some insulated waterproof hiking boots at Payless Shoesource. The current price of a comparable model is $45.

These boots have worked well for several years. They are good to -20F with a couple pairs of socks, but after half an hour I can feel a bit of numbness in the toes. However, the "cheap" part of the equation is showing up now. A couple of the hooks for the laces have broken off. The boots as a whole are looking a bit worn.

When the current boots wear out, I will spend a bit more on better boots to replace them. I think this is one area where more money equals better quality, and one would be happier with better quality.

bijan 11-14-10 09:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by swwhite (Post 11787632)
When I started riding in winter, I made it a game to go cheap ("I don't need no stinkin' high-end gear.") .

I went the same route, and when I wanted a solution to keep my feet dry during extremely wet days, I got a pair of rubber "hunting" boots. They're basically thick rubber boots with insulation inside for $30 Canadian. They're rated to -40 or something, though I doubt they'd be warm past half that much, they are as warm as anything else I've worn. I rode about 250km in them this weekend, though I'm sure you could get "better" boots for more money.

Though if I were going to ride for an hour or less I could just as well wear sneakers or very light boots as long as it wasn't wet.

marley mission 11-15-10 02:44 AM

oneill 7mm surf booties w underarmour socks

Juha 11-15-10 02:50 AM

Depends on what kind of winter you have. For me, Goretex hiking boots in 1-1,5 sizes bigger than usual to accommodate for proper felt insoles and wool socks. Insoles and socks alone make even a thinly insulated shoe a lot warmer, but only if you have enough room for them inside the shoe.

wolfchild 11-15-10 04:25 AM

I use a pair of insulated hunting boots, very similar to "Sorrels" , they are cheap and very warm. I used to have a pair of expensive goretex boots but after two winters I had to throw them out. Salt destroyed them.Also I am not a big fan of goretex lined boots, they still get wet. Goretex doesn't seem to do very much when it comes to boots, it may be ok for outwear like jackets, pants, gloves etc, but not for boots.

dr. spectrum 11-15-10 09:20 AM

I am in a very small minority, but I like a well worn pair of Doc Martens.

nelson249 11-15-10 09:43 PM

Canadian Forces combat boots and a set of MEC shoe covers when it gets really nasty.

JimDDD 11-16-10 08:05 AM

Because of the many deep puddles I encounter on partly plowed, salted roads, I prefer fully waterproof boots. (I always use platforms for my somewhat urban commute.) I tried a pair of waterproof winter hiking boots, but ended up with cold wet feet far too often. I use a cheap-but-warm pair with rubber exterior that I got at a general shoe store. With these boots, I can stop in a puddle on the shoulder when needed, haul my bike over the 2 foot piles of snow left by plows at intersections, etc.

I am not a performance-oriented rider, so I'll gladly trade some efficiency for warm, dry feet and a pleasant ride.

Arcanum 11-16-10 09:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Captain Blight (Post 11778473)
Gore-Tex or similar vapor-permeable membrane waterproofing; Thinsulate or Quallofil or the like for insulation. Not too, too aggressive a tread, you don't want your feet to 'default' to an uncomfortable spot on the pedals though you might get lucky. Mid-height; too tall an upper feels really funny, and too low admits cold and snow.

Pretty much all this. I have a pair of Columbia boots that are good down to -20F and have Gore-Tex waterproofing. The soles are getting worn through, though, so I might have to replace them soon. Not looking forward to trying to find something comparable.

CharlieFree 11-16-10 11:02 AM

Though I personally have not tried them, a year-round bike commuting staff member at a local outdoor equipment store highly recommends non-SPD mountain bike shoes, sized a bit larger than usual for thicker socks, etc.. Stiff soles, good walkability, cut higher than a sneaker but lower than a boot, and excellent grip on platforms were his reasons.

Hezz 11-19-10 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CharlieFree (Post 11795428)
Though I personally have not tried them, a year-round bike commuting staff member at a local outdoor equipment store highly recommends non-SPD mountain bike shoes, sized a bit larger than usual for thicker socks, etc.. Stiff soles, good walkability, cut higher than a sneaker but lower than a boot, and excellent grip on platforms were his reasons.

Something like this might work. Probably be warm enough but might not be breathable enough. Made for DH mountain bike racing it has a sticky sole and is padded to protect the foot which should make it warm.

http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/211...ennie-Shoe.htm


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:54 PM.