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Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

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Old 12-18-10, 09:24 AM   #1
wkatastrof
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DIY Studs on 27" tire (Tioga Bloodhound) Question

Hello everyone,

Main question: I was thinking of studding (as per the stickied DIY studs thread) the Tioga Bloodhound 27 1-3/8 tire that I just bought for the week or two of snow here. What do you think?

Background:
I've got a '76 Schwinn continental that is my only bike for all-year round use. I commute to work only about 4 miles (one way) in a city/suburban environment for about two years now on this bike minus snow and ice. This is the bike I've got, so I'm not really concerned that I could spend more money on a lighter bike or something more recent. I've recently gotten alloy 27" wheels for it, new sunrace 5-sp freewheel, chain, schimano tourney RD, kool stop continental pads, rear specialized tri-sport 27 1-1/4 tire, and a kenda k35 tire on the front and replaced all cable/housing except for the front brake. Everything else is stock. - I'll be getting Crane Creek SCR-5 brake levers in the next week or so to replace the stock levers.

I'm done with the kenda tires as the rear didn't take glass very well, and the front tire, even if its only 2 months old, is already starting to show long cracks between the black and tan rubber. (Though, I've been using them for 2 years... started going through them too fast).

I'm in New Jersey so the winter here can get down to the 10's and 20's (F). In the winter there could be up to 1ft+ of snow at a time, usually melting and refreezing for about a week or longer. Not as cold as some of the places I've read about here, but still pretty cold.

I bought a Tioga Bloodhound 27 1-3/8 tire as I've heard they're pretty good for when there is some light snow. (Also, if my tires have thus far been 27 1-1/4... will the 27 1-3/8 fit OK as well? Hard to find any info on the differences between 1-1/4, 1-3/8, and 1-1/8.) For the few times it snows, I usually take the bus, but if I can stud this tire for the front, and people would think this would be OK I'll totally go for it. I would probably get another 27 inch alloy rim so that I could switch them out easily. What do people think?

Since I ride in the rain, (no snow yet) my bike gets really dirty, really really fast, any suggestions? All of the bikes I've seen here look almost absolutely pristine like no one ever rides them.

One more question... I still have my old steel rims. How can I learn to build wheels so I can build 700 size wheels with the schwinn hubs? Would I need to service the hubs too? How do I learn to do that?

I would love to find another old neglected Schwinn continental or alike chap for a project bike. Its hard to want to tinker with the one I have when that means not being able to ride it as a main form of transportation. I was thinking of trying a fixed-gear bike/put one together. Never ridden one before, but I hear one gets more control with one. Don't know what all the hype is about with the hip kids though... and not really my concern. I just like bikes!

Thanks!


Here is a photo of my bike right before I bought it. I've noticed a lot more of the paint has come off in certain spots since then from riding and keeping a lock on it at bike racks filled with bikes. Oh well...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg tbikea.jpg (102.5 KB, 38 views)
File Type: jpg tioga.jpg (16.0 KB, 41 views)

Last edited by wkatastrof; 12-18-10 at 11:16 AM. Reason: forgot attachments...
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Old 01-01-11, 02:57 PM   #2
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So, I went through with this and based my work on the sticked thread in the Winter Cycling forum.

I drilled the holes from the outside in, then installed 70+ 3/8 inch screws every four knobs, with every 4th screw on a knob closer to the center.

I then cut the beads off of an old Kenda K35 tire and used it as a liner. I used gaffer's tape to hold the liner in place and to cover the liner edges from the tube. For now, I put it on an old steel rim and reused the tube as well.

After mounting the tire, I used a dremel tool to cut the tips off of the screws so that they were flat instead of a point. I have plenty of clearance. Haven't tried the fender yet.

It works well. All the snow here is melting so I wasn't able to try it on black ice, but going through slush piles I could feel the tire bite.

Also, I might get another Schwinn conti which is 3 inches shorter than the one I have, but I think it'll still be ok. I'd use it for the winter, while then cleaning the current one I have and using it in the dry weather. Schwinn conti in good shape for $50-75. Is that a good deal? I see them going for $125+ so it sounds like it is.

Here are some photos. They are from my phone, so sorry about the quality.


Attached Images
File Type: jpg 0101111546-00.jpg (102.1 KB, 34 views)
File Type: jpg 0101111531-00.jpg (96.4 KB, 61 views)
File Type: jpg 0101111531-01.jpg (100.0 KB, 40 views)
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Old 01-01-11, 03:23 PM   #3
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Looks like you've done a very nice job... have used and have recommended the Bloodhound for folks running 630 wheels as they are a decent tyre that does not cost much at all.

Can't speak to how much Schwinns are worth as it's a market driven thing and we see very few of them here... I was sorely tempted to pick up a lemon yellow one a few months back as it got dropped off at the co-op.

People can slag them for their weight but at the end of it all when we have gone and cockroaches rule the earth, there will still be electroforged Schwinns waiting for someone to ride them.

It is nice to have a B bike if you are a committed commuter and then you do have a backup or a bike to use while you tweak the A bike and a pair of decent bikes still costs less than a crappy car.
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Old 01-02-11, 12:52 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wkatastrof View Post
Hello everyone,

Main question: I was thinking of studding (as per the stickied DIY studs thread) the Tioga Bloodhound 27 1-3/8 tire that I just bought for the week or two of snow here. What do you think?

Background:
I've got a '76 Schwinn continental that is my only bike for all-year round use. I commute to work only about 4 miles (one way) in a city/suburban environment for about two years now on this bike minus snow and ice. This is the bike I've got, so I'm not really concerned that I could spend more money on a lighter bike or something more recent. I've recently gotten alloy 27" wheels for it, new sunrace 5-sp freewheel, chain, schimano tourney RD, kool stop continental pads, rear specialized tri-sport 27 1-1/4 tire, and a kenda k35 tire on the front and replaced all cable/housing except for the front brake. Everything else is stock. - I'll be getting Crane Creek SCR-5 brake levers in the next week or so to replace the stock levers.

I'm done with the kenda tires as the rear didn't take glass very well, and the front tire, even if its only 2 months old, is already starting to show long cracks between the black and tan rubber. (Though, I've been using them for 2 years... started going through them too fast).

I'm in New Jersey so the winter here can get down to the 10's and 20's (F). In the winter there could be up to 1ft+ of snow at a time, usually melting and refreezing for about a week or longer. Not as cold as some of the places I've read about here, but still pretty cold.

I bought a Tioga Bloodhound 27 1-3/8 tire as I've heard they're pretty good for when there is some light snow. (Also, if my tires have thus far been 27 1-1/4... will the 27 1-3/8 fit OK as well? Hard to find any info on the differences between 1-1/4, 1-3/8, and 1-1/8.) For the few times it snows, I usually take the bus, but if I can stud this tire for the front, and people would think this would be OK I'll totally go for it. I would probably get another 27 inch alloy rim so that I could switch them out easily. What do people think?

Since I ride in the rain, (no snow yet) my bike gets really dirty, really really fast, any suggestions? All of the bikes I've seen here look almost absolutely pristine like no one ever rides them.

One more question... I still have my old steel rims. How can I learn to build wheels so I can build 700 size wheels with the schwinn hubs? Would I need to service the hubs too? How do I learn to do that?

I would love to find another old neglected Schwinn continental or alike chap for a project bike. Its hard to want to tinker with the one I have when that means not being able to ride it as a main form of transportation. I was thinking of trying a fixed-gear bike/put one together. Never ridden one before, but I hear one gets more control with one. Don't know what all the hype is about with the hip kids though... and not really my concern. I just like bikes!

Thanks!


Here is a photo of my bike right before I bought it. I've noticed a lot more of the paint has come off in certain spots since then from riding and keeping a lock on it at bike racks filled with bikes. Oh well...
Most of those old 27 inch road bikes have lots of clearance for wide tires. As long as the tires clear the brakes and everything else you can put as wide a tire as you want. I think someone makes a 27 inch carbide studded snow tire. That's what I would go with if possible. The alloy rims are a big improvement and help a lot in stopping and accelerating. And the old steel frame is heavy but bombproof. A good short and medium distance commuter bike when maintained. Once you get the right tires you might want to put on a second thicker wrap of bar tape and maybe an anatomical seat to make it more comfortable. You could probably put on tires as wide as 1.75 inches or so on that bike. But in my experience road bikes don't handle that well with tires much over 1.5 inches wide.

Last edited by Hezz; 01-02-11 at 01:00 AM.
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Old 01-02-11, 04:11 PM   #5
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Tioga Bloodhounds

They tend to be a softer rubber and do hold pretty well on snow. Using a road bike where you live makes sense, but if you're into serious ice and snow fine yourself an old mountain bike and use knobbies(2.1) with lowered air pressure. Your Schwinn is ideal for converting into a commuter cycle to use during the other 50 weeks of the year. I got my MTB free from the dump and use it predominantly, during the winter. I live in the country and do a lot of gravel roads, without studs and do just fine. Watch your momentum and don't make any sharp turns.
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Old 01-02-11, 04:26 PM   #6
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wkatastrof, I have a 19" Varsity that I'll give you. It needs a ton of work, but it's possible to get it going.
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Old 01-17-11, 06:00 AM   #7
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wkatastrof, I have a 19" Varsity that I'll give you. It needs a ton of work, but it's possible to get it going.

Cool; thanks very much. I'm interested in this. Do you have a photo of it, or could you atleast explain its condition? I wouldn't mind putting work into it. My current bike is at about 23 inches from bb to the seat post. Do you think 3 inches will make a big difference in comfort?
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