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  1. #51
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bac
    I only use these on the VERY cold days. They are a bit pricey, but your toes will thank you over, and over again! I run Lake MXZ 300 winter clipless mtb shoes. They are also a bit pricey, but man do they ever work. I use wool, or thick, wicking-type socks underneath. Sporting both the Lakes, and the toe warmers, I can ride all day in the coldest temps, and my feet are always warm.


    Bac,

    I'm gonna try your combination.
    I just got my MXZ 300's for xmas and, let's say, i tried to push the limits of the shoes without wool or wicking socks.
    my experiment didn't work....
    i tried another kind of "aerospace" design sock that uses your body heat to generate heat.... they left my toes cold..not numb but cold.

  2. #52
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    Senior Member bac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by landrover

    Bac,

    I'm gonna try your combination.
    I just got my MXZ 300's for xmas and, let's say, i tried to push the limits of the shoes without wool or wicking socks.
    my experiment didn't work....
    i tried another kind of "aerospace" design sock that uses your body heat to generate heat.... they left my toes cold..not numb but cold.
    How cold was it when you rode? When it gets REALLY cold (single digit, and below), I also use chemical toe warmers. Also, make sure that your sock isn't so thick that it compress your toes, and cuts off circulation.

    Let us know how you make out!

  3. #53
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Hey Bac,

    I got the MXZ 300's in a size 50 instead of my usual 48.
    It wasn't that cold yesterday, maybe 25/28 degrees before sunrise.
    I also had a polypro liner on,too.
    it could have been operator error---maybe i had em strapped too tight.
    Last edited by landrover; 12-29-04 at 06:51 PM.

  4. #54
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    I had a nice three hour ride the other day. It was 15 degrees f. I was not cold I just had to come home for something else. On my feet I have at this temp...

    fleece socks

    chemical toe warmer under toes, in shoe. Only below about 20 f, Shoes not laced too tight.

    small sandwich bag over toes.

    cycling shoes

    larger bag over front of shoe

    huge stretched out size 13 socks.

    plastic bag, just the front.

    neoprene bike shoe cover lined

    plastic bag

    another neoprene shoe cover

    Flat pedals not clipped in no cleats.

    this has been working for years. It's as warm as my heavily insulated Sorrel boots, but it's very light and easy to pedal with. I can go for six hours in this temp On the MTB in the snow.

  5. #55
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    aha ,

    i see the common denominator here..going clipless in winter.
    i think that may help my digits endure the ride

  6. #56
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    Wool socks, cycling shoes with no mesh and when it gets really cold i'll put the booties on. So fat this year I have only had to use the toe warmers twice

  7. #57
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    I am vegan myself, and in my search for animal-friendly winter boots I found out that the Baffin boots models Impact, Vanguard, Snowstorm, Heat and Tribute all contain no leather or wool. Even though the site doesn't show, these boots are rated from about -40c to -70c (-40F to -100 something F). Their website is http://www.baffin.com I haven't tried any of these boots out riding, but it's nice to know they're there just in case I need them. (just in case someone were to mail order something like these, I tried on some of the colder rated boots in town, and they would be way too warm even for a northern Alberta climate I figure)(Marks Workwear House and MEC in Canada sells them)


    >I don't know about temperature control, but I am a veggie and although I have a few pairs of leather >shoes that I inherited as hand-me-downs, I will not buy any that have leather in them because I just >feel wrong wearing it. I have been looking everywhere for something though.
    >
    >I have found New England Overshoes, but they seem pretty big as you put them over your own shoes. >They are supposed to be rated down to -20F, but I would really like to find an alternative that isn't so >cumbersome. I still want to be able to use my toe clips.
    >
    >If you find anything let me know, and I will do likewise if you want. It seems that everything that is warm >just doesn't work!! Grrrrr....
    >
    >Kat
    >
    >>>Is leather bad for temperature control? Or is it an animal rights thing? Because I'm a vegetarian also >>>looking for animal-friendly winter boots.

  8. #58
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    I cycle untill around -25 C and use a pair of well lubricated prospector boots (sorry leather) and find they work great.

    One point. Your feet and hands will be the first to get cold if you do not wear enough on your upper body, no mater what you put on your feet. The body consentrates blood flow to the central body trying to keep it warm.

  9. #59
    a human
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    I just found an interesting product online which some people may be interested in. A chemically heated insole for your shoes or boots. Go to http://www.heatfactory.com to check it out.

  10. #60
    Senior Member giorgios's Avatar
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    Or you can just do it KILL BILL style..."OK know wiggle your toe"

  11. #61
    Senior Member giorgios's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdale56
    I also suffer from cold feet.

    I use a polyprolene liner sock with a thick smart wool sock.

    I bought a pair of shoes on E-bay that was one size larger for winter, I like to stay SPD.

    I also got a pair of neoprene booties. The brand I got was Sidetrack(Ebay for $20,LBS $30) because they are one brand that is big enough for my feet.

    I use chemical footwarmers too, you have to trial and error those for a good brand because some are better than others.

    All in all, gives me heavy feet, but so is the rest of me.

    Still looking for goretex SPD bicycling shoes.

    What size feet do you have?

  12. #62
    Senior Member cdale56's Avatar
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    I wear size 13 regular and 14 in winter.

    Since I posted that I have switched to a mid weight smart wool sock with good results.

    Does pretty good with dry cold conditions, still looking for wet cold perfection......

    On a few snowy/sleet/freezing rain rides with slush/snow on ground, I just used Goretex hiking boots with no change to my Time ATAC pedals. That worked well except I got a little cold,(two hours riding) I did not use toe warmers. Too bad no SPD

  13. #63
    bici accumulatori pinerider's Avatar
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    Fellow Canadians, this is your lucky week!!!

    $10 off Battery powered socks, mitts and gloves at Canadian Tire! Regular $24.99, on for $14.99.
    I'm going to pick up a pair of the socks, I don't like having feet that feel like bricks after a 45 minute commute when it's -15C outside. (Last winter I got that brick feeling while wearing polyester sock liners under wool socks under insulated hiking boots) I'll try the electric socks, I plan on not plugging them in until my feet start getting cold.
    ...!

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenyBen
    Anyone knows where one might find electric socks? And how about electric gloves?

    I found this place for socks
    http://www.allsportsocks.com/batpowbrlecs.html (but they are currently closed)
    and this one
    http://www.thunderboltsocks.com/newproducts.htm (WAY too expensive)

    A search on elecrtic gloves turned out nothing but motorcycle gloves.
    Canadian Tire has battery powered socks and gloves on for 14.99 40% off batteries sold separatly.

  15. #65
    bici accumulatori pinerider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cristoff
    Canadian Tire has battery powered socks and gloves on for 14.99 40% off batteries sold separatly.
    I had a good look at the socks today and didn't buy them! I can't see how they stay up with a D cell hanging on top of each of them (I hate socks that don't stay up!) and I'm sure the battery pack would interfere with my pants somehow, plus the electrical arrangements look real chintzy and not long lasting.
    ...!

  16. #66
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    For cold feet try poly socks, thermal or wool socks,mtb shoes ,homemade thermal shoe covers made out of socks with cutouts for cleats and neoprene booties over that.Make sure can wiggle your toes.

  17. #67
    Listen to me powers2b's Avatar
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    Cotton socks and leather insulated winter boots (JEEP brand for no particular reason).
    Cages on the pedals.
    6 deg F no cold toes.
    I could not feel my knees for a while after the ride so I will be looking for some 80's leg warmers soon.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by coldairheaven
    I just found an interesting product online which some people may be interested in. A chemically heated insole for your shoes or boots. Go to http://www.heatfactory.com to check it out.
    I think I saw these at MarksWork Warehouse.

  19. #69
    CYCLEBUM slone130's Avatar
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    I normally commute anywhere from 0 to 35F this time of the year. My commute is about 7 miles one way. I usually wear one pair of cotton socks, my shimano road cycling shoes adn an old pair of cotton socks over the shoes. I have yet to get annoyingly cold on any of my rides. I think the main key is keeping the circulation going. I've tried layering inside my shoes, even buying bigger shoes, and I just can't get past the constriction.

  20. #70
    Senior Member bkbroil's Avatar
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    I've been out in -10f with Neoprene Sidetrac booties, two pairs of socks and (THIS IS A MUST) Grabber Toe Warmers. I picked up a bunch of hand and toe warmers from Dick's Sporting Goods for $1.50 each.....The great thing is I read a post on these forums about putting the warmers in a zip lock baggie and then in a small tupperware container as soon as you are done. The warmers last 8 hours and I use them 4 times each. I think that's pretty cheap to keep my toes warm (not sweaty).

    I'm looking at my little tupperware container right now and thinking I'll have to take the warmers out soon to go shovel all of this snow that we're expecting.
    bkbroil

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  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaskCyclist
    I bought a pair of North Face hiking boots and I wear polypropylene or wool socks but my feet are just barely warm and it is only -5 celcius. I don't want to have an excuse when it hits -30C. I have read some people use some type of neoprene boot covers. What are these and where can I find them? I suppose another alternative is to shell out more cash for actual winter boots. What are the best bang for the buck? Someone here also suggested maybe using putting a plastic bag over the socks inside existing shoes to keep the wind out. What do you think?

    Thanks in advance for the feedback.
    The neoprene booties you've heard about are intended to cover cycling shoes while riding. You're in Regina man, you need winter boots anyway. Go get them. However if you're feet are getting cold at -5c take more time at the store getting them fitted and get them fitted for wearing with wool socks rated to -40 and below. It sounds like you've got issues with circulation if you've got issues with boots and wool at -5c, be sure you're next pair is fitted properly with lots of room to move around.

  22. #72
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    I have a 20-25 minute commute at 2am in NYC. I have various woolsocks that I wear between 20F and 35F. When it dips below 20F, I'll usually wear SmartWool socks with an Acorn fleece sock over them inside Clark boots. They've worked fine for me so far this winter, although I've thought about another thin cotton layer when the wind chill dips below 0F.

  23. #73
    go go go go -=solewheelin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes
    I had a nice three hour ride the other day. It was 15 degrees f. I was not cold I just had to come home for something else. On my feet I have at this temp...
    fleece socks
    chemical toe warmer under toes, in shoe. Only below about 20 f, Shoes not laced too tight.
    small sandwich bag over toes.
    cycling shoes
    larger bag over front of shoe
    huge stretched out size 13 socks.
    plastic bag, just the front.
    neoprene bike shoe cover lined
    plastic bag
    another neoprene shoe cover
    Flat pedals not clipped in no cleats.
    this has been working for years. It's as warm as my heavily insulated Sorrel boots, but it's very light and easy to pedal with. I can go for six hours in this temp On the MTB in the snow.
    Ok now,
    Reading this informative thread for the past few months has got me realizing how difficult it is for us who would just rather go clipless.
    So ive been considering throwing in the towel, and buying the power grips kit (w/ pedals) to use with my winter boots.
    But as im sure id get used to it, im also sure id miss my spds.
    Here are some obvious issues with bike shoes in the winter:

    -Too much breathability
    -Not enough room to really layer
    -Metal to metal contact gets soles cold fast
    -No coverage on ankles
    -Usually thin materials without much insulation
    -need of extra gear gets expensive
    -extra steps making preparation time too long

    Gaiters are a great idea for ankle to shin warmth but are between 15-50$.
    And if you need feet to be waterproof as well, Totes rubbers (boot style) can be found 4$-9$ on sale.
    Grabber warmers are cheap and work great.
    So, I could go with the Lake MXZ 300, winter shoes to save some hassle (i hear they dont fit well for wide feet). They look sweet, but who wants to buy another pair of shoes till you absolutely need them? and seasonal shoes? well, i say theyre worth it if youre a serious winter cyclist or you live up in the great north. (other options are Gaerne Polar Winter and Northwave Celsius)

    But im brainstorming ideas. Practical, inexpensive, creative, simple, effective and sensible ways to stay warm going clipless in the winter, but using methods like circulation, body heat and perhaps a needle and thread as your main sources for warmth. My idea here is to prepare and temporarily winterize the shoes. To perhaps add some warmth without restricting circulation. but without spending money on extra gear.
    ideas:
    -Find the roomier, stretchier meshed parts of the shoe (top, sides) and temporarily sew some custom fitted wool (or material of choice from the fabric store) along the inside lining of the shoe to team up with the sock where it counts.
    -Perhaps some kind of nylon shell sewn or even super glued along the outside to add windproofing, or better yet, felt lined vinyl to add some insulation
    -stop making that shoe so damn tight
    -Even stretch your shoes with an old shoe stretcher if you must for circulation purposes.

    theres have to be more ways...

    -=stevey

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by -=solewheelin
    Ok now,
    Reading this informative thread for the past few months has got me realizing how difficult it is for us who would just rather go clipless.
    So ive been considering throwing in the towel, and buying the power grips kit (w/ pedals) to use with my winter boots.
    But as im sure id get used to it, im also sure id miss my spds.
    Here are some obvious issues with bike shoes in the winter:

    -Too much breathability
    -Not enough room to really layer
    -Metal to metal contact gets soles cold fast
    -No coverage on ankles
    -Usually thin materials without much insulation
    -need of extra gear gets expensive
    -extra steps making preparation time too long

    Gaiters are a great idea for ankle to shin warmth but are between 15-50$.
    And if you need feet to be waterproof as well, Totes rubbers (boot style) can be found 4$-9$ on sale.
    Grabber warmers are cheap and work great.
    So, I could go with the Lake MXZ 300, winter shoes to save some hassle (i hear they dont fit well for wide feet). They look sweet, but who wants to buy another pair of shoes till you absolutely need them? and seasonal shoes? well, i say theyre worth it if youre a serious winter cyclist or you live up in the great north. (other options are Gaerne Polar Winter and Northwave Celsius)

    But im brainstorming ideas. Practical, inexpensive, creative, simple, effective and sensible ways to stay warm going clipless in the winter, but using methods like circulation, body heat and perhaps a needle and thread as your main sources for warmth. My idea here is to prepare and temporarily winterize the shoes. To perhaps add some warmth without restricting circulation. but without spending money on extra gear.
    ideas:
    -Find the roomier, stretchier meshed parts of the shoe (top, sides) and temporarily sew some custom fitted wool (or material of choice from the fabric store) along the inside lining of the shoe to team up with the sock where it counts.
    -Perhaps some kind of nylon shell sewn or even super glued along the outside to add windproofing, or better yet, felt lined vinyl to add some insulation
    -stop making that shoe so damn tight
    -Even stretch your shoes with an old shoe stretcher if you must for circulation purposes.

    theres have to be more ways...

    -=stevey
    Try duct taping over vented areas,insulated insoles,old thermal socks ,over shoes,booties Etc. I know what you mean that's why I made my version of the gripper.re;pedal adaption.I tried them yesterday and worked well. I had no problems getting my boots in and out .Had good contact on full pedalling almost like my old Welgos.Only thing was that a couple of bolts got loose, I will put bigger washers on so I can tighten down onto the rubber, the small star washers dig in too much.

  25. #75
    Enjoy
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    Agreed. There's always the dressing contraints at work. Spend 15min's russling baggies, socks, underwear, etc in the bathroom and notice the reaction you get when departing from the stall For dressing, it needs to be a quick in-out kind of thing.

    For most people, a racing shoe just doesn't cut it. For year around cycling you need more of a waterproof mountain bike shoe with a recessed cleat. A shoe that you can actually walk on the ice, snow and muck). These are good down to about 40F and for colder temps and wind chill they still need a windproof layer like sealskins and *still* need at least 1 set of baggies for the toes.

    Haven't found a good solution even with the Diadora H20 Pablanos (Mt. Bike shoe).

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