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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    27 inch studded tire?

    I'd like to put studded tires on my old Motobecane fixie, but 27" studded tires are a little hard to come by. I'm also considering studding my own. I saw a kit in the Quality Bicycle catalog from Innova the looks better than just using sheet metal screws. Has anyone tried this kit or know where to find 27" studded tires?

  2. #2
    Year-round cyclist
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    AFAIK, forget it. Nobody seems to make 27" studded tire.
    Your next best deal would be to find a knobby tire with a soft compound. This year, I just tried a set of Continental Twister (700x32 and 700x37, but I think a similar tire is also available in 27"), and I found in the last two days that they offer very good traction in snow or soft ice.

    Another option would be to change your wheel -- or actually your front wheel -- for 700c. A used front wheel would be fairly cheap, would add fender clearance and would allow you to use (a) studded tire(s).

    As for the stud kit, if it is the one I know, it is basically a set of 100 studs that fit in the holes of Innova studded tires. So that's good if you want to replace worn out or lost studs, but you need to have the studded tires in the first place. And quite frankly, the Innova tires and studs aren't worthed your money. I have used one for about 1 month (total, split on 2-3 years) and worn out studs completely. Besides, the rubber is so hard that the tire itself is slippery so you don't have that much traction.

    So if you want studs, invest in a Nokian.
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  3. #3
    Long Live Long Rides
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    The tricky thing about studding narrow tires is that the tires won't ride on top of the snow. I studded a pair of 26x1.5 knobbies and rode them in the snow to work. The tires seemed to find every frozen rut. I went down a couple of times.
    I have also studded 26x1.95 knobbies. With a wider, more agressive tread, the tires have an easier time riding on top of the snow.

    Of course, the rule of rules: Try it! It's always fun to try new things. I used real small screws and used a worn out slick as a liner. I cut the bead off to make installing easier. The screw only stuck out about 2 threads. Let us know if you get something to work!
    Jharte
    Touring...therapy for the soul.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Thanks for the info! I didn't realize the Innova kit was just to replace missing studs.

    I guess I'll just stick to my SS mtb once the snow gets deep.

  5. #5
    Year-round cyclist
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    Quote Originally Posted by jharte
    The tricky thing about studding narrow tires is that the tires won't ride on top of the snow. I studded a pair of 26x1.5 knobbies and rode them in the snow to work. The tires seemed to find every frozen rut. I went down a couple of times.
    I have also studded 26x1.95 knobbies. With a wider, more agressive tread, the tires have an easier time riding on top of the snow...

    Using narrow tires successfully depends a lot on the type of snow. I have used quite successfully 700x32 slicks a few times (with a real width of 29 mm, or 1 1/8") in snow. The 1,5" knobbies don't dig as efficiently in snow and tend to float only sometimes, so they would work fine on roads but not offroad (I presume, because I don't offroad that much and not at all in winter). Narrow tires fare best either in light fluffy snow (i.e. easy to cut) or when there is a layer of wet snow on unfrozen ground. In that situation, the best tires are those that allow contact with asphalt.

    One small detail: most people who ride in snow with narrow tires talk about 700x23 to 28 slicks maximum. IOW, your 26 x 1.5" would be considered as wide tires by those folks!
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

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