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Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

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Old 12-15-04, 01:53 PM   #1
Trix
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Frozen parts...not on the bike.

So as you would expect things are a little cool up accross the border. I just went for what turned out to be the coledest ride of the year to date (no really!!?!?!?). In any case, temperature registered around -1 fahrenheit with the wind (and I got to ride into that wind as well....yeay). In any case, got about 14k and realized wow, I've frozen my...."kick stand". So now I'm in pain, I mean real pain. I get back to the office and spend an excruciating 5 minutes warming up the boys.

Question, I'm already wearing shorts and full leggers, what's it going to take?

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Old 12-15-04, 02:44 PM   #2
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Winter bibs and if you do live north of the border I think you may need a Gortex shell. Shorts and leggings are not going to cut it. Colorado cyclist,Performance, Nashbar ect. all sell winter gear.


http://www.nashbar.com/index.cfm

http://www.performancebike.com/

www.coloradocyclist.com

Check out ice bike too

http://www.icebike.com/Default.htm
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Old 12-15-04, 04:30 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trix
Question, I'm already wearing shorts and full leggers, what's it going to take?
A fleece jock. preferabley with a windstopping nylon layer. There's a company that makes long underwear with the shape of a hand in nylon protecting the appropriate area.

Otherwise maybe a battery operated sock?
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Old 12-15-04, 07:45 PM   #4
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if you're riding in negative 1, you have more than enough b***s to spare
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Old 12-15-04, 07:56 PM   #5
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if you're riding in negative 1, you have more than enough b***s to spare
-1 windchill.
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Old 12-15-04, 08:38 PM   #6
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Wow you have balls of steel, i salute you. A nice warm fireplace might do well.
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Old 12-15-04, 09:15 PM   #7
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My coldest ride to-date (1st year winter-biking) was -22C(-8F) / -28C(-18F) windchill.
My "kick stand" was fine... a little cool maybe, but fine.
Clothing: padded clycling shorts, micro-fleece long johns, thinly lined wind pants.
You could also try inserting a piece of fleece.
I think keeping the wind out is key though.
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Old 12-15-04, 09:19 PM   #8
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Hi,
I wear two layers of winter tights. The outer one is
a Sugoi that is huge, and doesn't restrict movement the
way most things will. But I don't usually ride when it's
freezing.
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Old 12-15-04, 10:00 PM   #9
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When factoring in wind chill be sure to factor the speed of passing cars and your own speed to the wind chill. So -1 and then if you're moving at 15mph you really need to dress for -16!

I have not yet figured out how to guess wind chlls for cars that are passing at 40mph.
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Old 12-16-04, 02:31 PM   #10
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Another think you might want to try is angling the nose of your saddle down a few more degrees. When you sit on a level bike seat, often it puts pressure on the soft tissue between your legs, cutting blood flow to certain organs which most people would not like to have frostbite on. Makes a big difference for me.
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Old 12-16-04, 04:38 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vrkelley
When factoring in wind chill be sure to factor the speed of passing cars and your own speed to the wind chill. So -1 and then if you're moving at 15mph you really need to dress for -16!

I have not yet figured out how to guess wind chlls for cars that are passing at 40mph.
You may want to check up on how windchill is calculated:

http://www.weatherimages.org/data/windchill.html
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Old 12-17-04, 10:23 AM   #12
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Yes this chart appears to be the "new" recalculated wind chart for USA and Canada. What they don't seem to factor in is your own speed, surrounding vehicle speeds etc.

Last edited by vrkelley; 12-17-04 at 11:48 AM.
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Old 12-17-04, 11:35 AM   #13
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My point is: I don't think you just subtract 1° for each MPH of wind speed to calculate windchill. Yes, if you're cycling at 15mph your windchill will be different from someone standing still. I'm not convinced that surrounding vehicles' speeds will have a huge impact on perceived temperature either.

Or maybe I'm just being pedantic.

Also, some friends and I had this conversation last night; one postulated that you dress for temperatures 20° higher than actual, to account for exertion-generated warmth. Seems like a reasonable ballpark.
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Old 12-17-04, 11:47 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by halfbiked
My point is: I don't think you just subtract 1° for each MPH of wind speed to calculate windchill. Yes, if you're cycling at 15mph your windchill will be different from someone standing still. I'm not convinced that surrounding vehicles' speeds will have a huge impact on perceived temperature either.

Also, some friends and I had this conversation last night; one postulated that you dress for temperatures 20° higher than actual, to account for exertion-generated warmth. Seems like a reasonable ballpark.
You could be right. Seems that if it's around 25F and my feet are cold, slowing down seems to help warm them up...the 20 degree higher theory jives w/ my experience ... *except* for feet, hands, ears and neck.
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Old 12-17-04, 12:30 PM   #15
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Well this should all work well. I think I'll have to go with thinly lined windbreakers from the get go, I might try adjusting the seat a bit and try to find a fleece soft-cup.

Now all I ask for are roads that are relatively snow free 3 days a week.

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Old 12-19-04, 12:13 AM   #16
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If windchill is a real problem, there's the old Alpiner trick of lining your clothes with newspaper. I've never tried it myself but I know some folks who do and say it's remarkably effective.
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Old 12-19-04, 07:25 AM   #17
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I have found that by stretching the front hem of my windbreaker jacket over the nose of my saddle I can provide additional wind protection to my crotch.Plus, it looks darn funny from the side............
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