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Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

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Old 12-21-12, 01:07 PM   #1
jawnn
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Wool or fishnet??

I have been thinking about fishnet long under pants, and need to know if they are as good as nylon reinforced Moreno wool.
This is the fishnet: http://wiggys.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=35

Any one use the fishnet for cycling? The maker does and he says they are good because they keep the cold pants off the skin, trapping an eighth in thin air pocket next to the skin.

I live near Seattle so I donít need arctic wear. But it does get windy as 40mph, and at 32 degrees that ainít no joke.
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Old 12-21-12, 02:06 PM   #2
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In theory maybe in real life the pants stick to the front of your legs exactly where more insulation is needed to protect against cold wind (front of the legs, knees) due in part to a mix of casimir effect, surface tension, static electricity and wind pressure. The only thin air pocket is on the back of your legs where you don't really need it.
Secondly the bellows effect don't work well in cold weather because there isn't any opened areas for the moisturized air to move out because of the discomfort due to cold air coming in through the opened area. Have you ever tried to ride without any neck protection in 25F weather?
Thirdly, thin air pockets generate good insulation only when the thickness of the air is not too much (less than 1/3 in) when it is thicker like with loose clothing for instance convective heat transfers through air movements like the bellows effect for instance are generated which reduce insulation

Last edited by erig007; 12-21-12 at 02:31 PM.
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Old 12-21-12, 02:33 PM   #3
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so the fish net would work better if the pants are not very loose?
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Old 12-21-12, 03:07 PM   #4
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so the fish net would work better if the pants are not very loose?
The open area problem remains.
The only thing i know is that wool has the higher insulation value (CLO per inch) on the market. But insulation is nothing without a windproof layer

You should rather try to find something really windproof to put over your pants.

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Old 12-21-12, 03:32 PM   #5
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Try polar fleece pants under your rain gear trousers.

I got some a few years back they sew a windblock shell and fleece lining together..
but sewing them together, as one is not necessary..

+ I've 'dried' polar fleece, by slapping it on a fence rail, etc.
and flinging the excess moisture out, then putting it back on.

Last edited by fietsbob; 12-21-12 at 03:40 PM.
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Old 12-21-12, 06:18 PM   #6
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The one brand of 'fishnet' thermal underwear I am familiar with were designed to be worn under another non-fishnet base layer. There are three reasons for this, I think: the layer of air is insulation, and the lack of material touching your skin in most places allows your sweat to dissipate as vapour, and when the outer layer gets damp it is not touching your skin.
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Old 12-22-12, 01:02 PM   #7
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I have totally rain proof pants, but it holds in too much sweat.

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You should rather try to find something really windproof to put over your pants.
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Old 12-22-12, 01:58 PM   #8
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I have totally rain proof pants, but it holds in too much sweat.
There are pants with windproof panels only on the front which allow the sweat to move away from the back. I have a sugoi RS zeroplus 320 bib tight which does that but i'm pretty sure there are pants like this as well. I think the sugoi RPM thermal pant has that

Last edited by erig007; 12-22-12 at 02:14 PM.
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Old 12-22-12, 04:23 PM   #9
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The woven track pants I wear for cool & cold weather bicycling have something like that fishnet built in, inside the outer layer.

http://www.underarmour.com/shop/us/en/pid1232850

It does seem to work well at insulating some while also allowing good breathability. I wear the track pants alone down to the mid-40's F (depending on wind); colder than that and I add midweight merino wool leggings underneath.

I haven't ever tried a fishnet specific layer like you are looking at, though.
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Old 12-24-12, 07:47 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
I have been thinking about fishnet long under pants, and need to know if they are as good as nylon reinforced Moreno wool.
This is the fishnet: http://wiggys.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=35

Any one use the fishnet for cycling? The maker does and he says they are good because they keep the cold pants off the skin, trapping an eighth in thin air pocket next to the skin.

I live near Seattle so I don’t need arctic wear. But it does get windy as 40mph, and at 32 degrees that ain’t no joke.
The fishnet stuff works great for your first base layer. With the nylon Merino wool over that for insulation. The wool which will absorb more sweat and will pull it away from the body. But I would only use on your torso and arms. On the legs long cycling tights work best in my opinion. Either as a base layer or as the only layer. They have the right amount of stretch and breathability that your legs need. You need less insulation and more breathability on your legs since they are doing most all of the work.

If your wearing some kind of pant just wear a light duty long cycling tight under your pants. That will be really warm. Too warm for above 40 degrees. I think it's better to have two or three pairs of cycling tights in different weights to use in various situations. If it's 32 F with 40mph winds you can put on the heavier pair. If your commuting to work. Just carry your pants in a back-pack or messenger bag. Or tied to your rear rack. The cycling tights can come off at work to dry out when you put your normal pants on.

If your riding for recreation. Ditch the pants and wear cycling tights. They work better than anything else for cycling. You can carry some rain pants to cover up if your on a long ride and might get caught in a cold rain. Check out Nashbar or Performance bike or PricePoint to get some deals on cycling tights/pants. You don't have to buy name brand.

Even if you only buy one piece of cycling wear get some winter tights. In my opinion the most important cycling specific thing you can have is the cycling shorts or tights for cold weather. Even if you are just a casual rider. If your worried about looks just get some cheap nylon uninsulated track pants at the local cheap-mart to go over your cycling tights or shorts.

The cheap nylon track pant over cycling shorts works well for those who's legs seem to stay warm easily. The Problem with nylon is that it doesn't stretch so you will get sores between your legs on long rides. This might not be an issue if your only riding five miles to work though.

Last edited by Hezz; 12-24-12 at 07:55 PM.
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Old 12-26-12, 12:30 PM   #11
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I wear work pants over light thermal pants. the heavy ones are too warm. I hate the way tights look but maybe under the pants will work.

Actualy I was thinking about something that will keep the wet pants off my skin. As is my long under pants get wet also.

My rain pants hold in to much steam. I need fish net on the back third.
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Old 12-26-12, 11:05 PM   #12
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I wear work pants over light thermal pants. the heavy ones are too warm. I hate the way tights look but maybe under the pants will work.

Actualy I was thinking about something that will keep the wet pants off my skin. As is my long under pants get wet also.

My rain pants hold in to much steam. I need fish net on the back third.
The problem is that you are wearing the wrong kind of gear for bike riding. Pants are usually cotton and that is the worst thing you can wear while bike riding on your legs.

It seems your ride is long enough for you to get real hot and sweaty. And you should not be getting wet if dressed properly. Trust me one this. Get the mesh for the top and a pair of cycling specific long pants. They make some for winter that are not as snug as tights but they are the right kind of material. Don't wear your work pants while riding but carry them with you to put on at work. You have too much on your legs so your whole body is running too hot.

Your pants are wet because they are made out of a type of material that absorbs water very well. Cycling pants are designed to not hold water and be the right combination of breathable and wind resistant. The air movement keeps them from getting to wet as they dry even at the same time that they are getting damp. Only in a hard rain should you put on your waterproof rain pants.

You want the kind of pants or tights that are stretchy with a soft shell.

You can get something like these inexpensive cycling tights and wear them over a pair of cycling shorts to get double coverage on the thighs.

http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/122...anel-Tight.htm

Last edited by Hezz; 12-26-12 at 11:14 PM.
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Old 12-27-12, 07:49 AM   #13
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You would need another layer on top of the fish net. The fish net just helps moisture escape into that second layer. I usually use a nylon shirt covered by a fleece and a "breathable" windproof layer on top. The breathable layers never let close to enough moisture out and the inside of it is always soaked after my ride. But because the wicking action of the other 2 layers, the moisture is away from my body and therefore I am comfortable.

I use Performance Thermal Tights for my legs which have worked well. Link here.
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Old 12-28-12, 12:50 PM   #14
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I don't use the rain pants and I realy need a good rain cape that will keep my legs dryer.

But the fish net seems good for keeping the wet off skin.

It's true that I need to remove the wool under shirt befroe riding home in less cold days.
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