Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Cyclist storckm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    My Bikes
    Yuba Mundo; Early 70's Free Spirit (Reynolds 531) fixie; 80's Shogun 500; Mid 90's Iron Horse tandem; trailer and tag-a-long; Schwinn Range for commuting, with lights and front and rear racks.
    Posts
    544
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Do studded tires make a difference on wet metal?

    Yesterday, we had our first snow in Columbus, OH, and a bit of ice on the roads. Of course, I put my snow tires on before taking my daughter to kindergarten. Later in the day, I found myself riding over some (dry) steel plates in the road, and fell to wondering whether the carbide studs would bite into the steel and give on traction on notoriously slippery wet steel. Does anyone have experience with this?

  2. #2
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    West Village, New York City
    My Bikes
    too many
    Posts
    18,295
    Mentioned
    24 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I don't think they would help. I would think they make traction worse. On a wet, slick surface, I think you'd want the most surface area possible.
    Please email me rather than sending me a private message. My address is noglider@pobox.com

    Tom Reingold
    Residences: West Village, New York City and High Falls, NY
    Employer: Larry's Freewheeling, 301 W 110 St, New York, NY 10026
    Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

  3. #3
    ride for a change modernjess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross-check & Moonlander, Pivot Mach 429, Ted Wojcik Sof-Trac, Ridley Orion. Santa Cruz Stigmata
    Posts
    2,011
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I wouldn't count on it. I'd treat it like ice with no studs, keep it straight, no leaning, no sudden moves.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Ultimate 2006, Litespeed Pisgah , Specialized Roubaix 2008, Trek Madone 2011
    Posts
    894
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Lots of variables. I run a set of Schwalbe Ice Spiker Pro 26 X 2.35. This tire has 361 studs in 5 rows. When I run the tire at 35 to 40 PSI the grip on bridge decks is far better than with a smooth tire on a wet deck. I checked and under those conditions, 3 rows of studs are in contact with the deck when cornering. Tungsten carbide does bite into mild steel deck plates.

  5. #5
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Norwalk, CT
    My Bikes
    2012 Cruzbike Sofrider, 2013 Cruzigami Mantis
    Posts
    2,771
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    I don't think they would help. I would think they make traction worse. On a wet, slick surface, I think you'd want the most surface area possible.
    Does it make a difference? Yes!

    Does it make it better? No. As Tom says, you want surface area and the studs are getting in the way of that.
    http://Charles.Plager.net
    http://RecumbentQuant.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    25 miles northwest of Boston
    My Bikes
    Bottecchia Sprint
    Posts
    11,962
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    studs are for something to dig into
    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

  7. #7
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    West Village, New York City
    My Bikes
    too many
    Posts
    18,295
    Mentioned
    24 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Right. Can't dig into water or steel. When they're "mixed," you still don't have an advantage.
    Please email me rather than sending me a private message. My address is noglider@pobox.com

    Tom Reingold
    Residences: West Village, New York City and High Falls, NY
    Employer: Larry's Freewheeling, 301 W 110 St, New York, NY 10026
    Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

  8. #8
    Senior Member urbanescapee's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    My Bikes
    2012 Marin Four Corners, 2013 Soma Saga
    Posts
    130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jimblairo View Post
    Tungsten carbide does bite into mild steel deck plates.
    +1

  9. #9
    Senior Member iforgotmename's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    1,528
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I went down while turning left while crossing a big manhole cover with studs last yeas...slippery.

  10. #10
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,303
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by urbanescapee View Post
    +1
    If you have a few thousand pounds to push it into the steel,it might. With a couple of hundred pounds? Nope. The studs are going to skate right over the surface and water is going to act like oil.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    535
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think studs help you much on steel plates. I try to avoid them when possible. I'm plus one on the lower tire pressure for more footprint. Around here the city will dig a hole this time of year for a repair and fix the road , maybe, by spring next year.
    " If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand which feeds you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countryman " Samuel Adams, 1772

  12. #12
    tougher than a boiled owl droy45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Rocky Coast of Maine
    My Bikes
    Fetish Cycles Fixation / Fuji S12S / Gary Fisher MTB / Raleigh Grand Prix / Ross Professional / Kent comfort cruiser
    Posts
    1,126
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    If you have a few thousand pounds to push it into the steel,it might. With a couple of hundred pounds? Nope. The studs are going to skate right over the surface and water is going to act like oil.
    +1
    For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. John 3:16

  13. #13
    Formerly Known as Newbie Juha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,593
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by storckm View Post
    ...give on traction on notoriously slippery wet steel.
    As said, the difference will be for the worse, if any. Depends on your tyre pressure, among other things. Wet cobblestone is another surface where studs don't automatically help.

    --J
    To err is human. To moo is bovine.

    Who is this General Failure anyway, and why is he reading my drive?


    Become a Registered Member in Bike Forums
    Community guidelines

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,253
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    If you have a few thousand pounds to push it into the steel,it might. With a couple of hundred pounds? Nope. The studs are going to skate right over the surface and water is going to act like oil.
    The Chicago Department of Mysterious Holes in Streets is very fond of using 3/4" thick steel plates to cover Mysterious Holes in Streets, so I get to ride over them more often than i'd care too. They're slippery as snot when wet, and studs don't help. They don't really hurt, either, though, assuming you've got normal tires that are mostly rubber. If they're covered in ice, studs work great...

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    NJ cellphone central
    My Bikes
    Surly Ogre // (old and gone) Cannondale ST400, Rockhopper Sport
    Posts
    468
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Studs will make it worse, same with motorcycle tires too.

  16. #16
    Transportation Cyclist turbo1889's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Montana U.S.A.
    My Bikes
    Too many to list, some I built myself including the frame. I "do" ~ Human-Only-Pedal-Powered-Cycles, Human-Electric-Hybrid-Cycles, Human-IC-Hybrid-Cycles, and one Human-IC-Electric-3way-Hybrid-Cycle
    Posts
    1,206
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've scratched the living daylights out of some mild steel angle stock I have in my shop for the big door slide wheels to roll on with studded bike tires and they do seem to grab on that.

    On the other hand they do not grab on rail tracks and make it worse not better then just plain rubber tires and the same is true sometimes on concrete that has been polished really flat and really hard (one roundabout in my area with patches like that which is hell with studded tires on if there isn't snow pack or ice on top).

    Long story short if its soft enough they will grab a little, but if its hard enough and smooth enough it makes it worse. Just like a cat sliding down a tin roof, either the cats claws grab and give it some traction and scratch the daylights out of the roof or they don't grab and the cat slides down the roof even faster. I've actually seen that difference when I re-roofed a shed on my place from really old galvanized metal roofing that the few stray mouse eating cats around my place climbed up and down no problem to the new metal roofing which was too hard of metal and their claws wouldn't grab and they just slid off really fast (they didn't seem to like it when I re-roofed that shed since they couldn't get up into the main shop going up that roof anymore).

    Soft enough metal you can get some grab - BUT DON'T COUNT ON IT !!! That's the exception not the norm.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    241
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If the studded tires also have a stickier cold-weather rubber compound, they could still have a bit more traction than a normal tire.

  18. #18
    Transportation Cyclist turbo1889's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Montana U.S.A.
    My Bikes
    Too many to list, some I built myself including the frame. I "do" ~ Human-Only-Pedal-Powered-Cycles, Human-Electric-Hybrid-Cycles, Human-IC-Hybrid-Cycles, and one Human-IC-Electric-3way-Hybrid-Cycle
    Posts
    1,206
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AlanKHG View Post
    If the studded tires also have a stickier cold-weather rubber compound, they could still have a bit more traction than a normal tire.
    Provided that you aren't just "riding on the studs" and the rubber of the tire is gripping as well and its grip isn't substantially reduced by the studs taking most of the contact weight ~ could be. Or in other words, might have to reduce your tire pressure if your running high pressure tires to get the rubber to get a good grip too.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •