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Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

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Old 12-03-13, 11:06 PM   #26
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Pogies on the handlebar means the gloves dont have to be so bulky.
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Old 12-03-13, 11:23 PM   #27
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I manage to do really well with a wool / thinsulate flip mitten with a wool / thinsulate glove underneath and this has kept my hands warm below -40C... it makes for a lot of wool and a rather windproof but breathable covering.

A similar wool / thinsulate glove under an insulated shell mitten is my other choice for hand coverings.
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Old 12-04-13, 07:25 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormdog42 View Post
(these are the Dogwood Designs regular pogies)
How do any of you who use them and like them fill in the gap that's left at the small end that goes over the bars (the gap between the brake cables and handlebars) when they're mounted on the bike? I tried stuffing it with some washcloths, but I'm not sure that helps. I think it's where the cold is coming from. I emailed the maker, and she said that in the 20 years she's made these, no one has ever said they've had this problem, so maybe there's something really obvious I'm not getting. But I'm about ready to send them back and try a lobster glove 'cause they're just not working for me.

I'd love advice and ideas from more experienced winter cyclists!

Not sure how the gap is since i don't own dogwood pogies. Have you tried with some
handlebar foam or inner tubes that go on the handlebar
+
old inner tube or balloon or plastic film
+
black tape
+
black zip tie or velcro or a rope?




Insert the handlebar foam first.
Insert a 1 foot long inner tube piece that will go over the brake cable and over the handlebar foam.
Insert your pogie the opening of the pogie going over half the foam that fit on the handlebar. Tighten the pogie's opening that goes over the handlebar up the max you can. Then slide the inner tube one half over the foam and one half over the pogie's opening. Seal the inner tube opening that is on the foam with tape and seal the other inner tube's opening (that is over the pogie's opening) with zip tie. Done

Last edited by erig007; 12-04-13 at 07:45 AM.
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Old 12-04-13, 02:13 PM   #29
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Flip mittens with a light weight glove are the way to go. Mittens are far superior to gloves and the flip aspect with the light weight glove gives you instant dexterity if you need it. I usually buy something similar to this. http://www.sierratradingpost.com/sco...women~p~5886d/

Just look for something in fleece or similar. Then again, put a light weight pair of gloves underneath. Do this and you will have no more cold hands guaranteed. I have used this set up for years in temps below 0 degrees F with no problems.
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Old 12-04-13, 02:21 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Fynn View Post
Flip mittens with a light weight glove are the way to go. Mittens are far superior to gloves and the flip aspect with the light weight glove gives you instant dexterity if you need it. I usually buy something similar to this. http://www.sierratradingpost.com/sco...women~p~5886d/

Just look for something in fleece or similar. Then again, put a light weight pair of gloves underneath. Do this and you will have no more cold hands guaranteed. I have used this set up for years in temps below 0 degrees F with no problems.
-20 C today with a windchill pushing things down to almost -30C... my hands were toasty warm.



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Old 12-04-13, 02:24 PM   #31
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You don't want something over those that the snow doesn't stick to?
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Old 12-04-13, 02:28 PM   #32
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You don't want something over those that the snow doesn't stick to?
I wear these in snowstorms, clinging snow has not been a problem.

For wetter conditions those shell mittens replace the flip mitts.
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Old 12-04-13, 03:22 PM   #33
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I confirm that going all the way for wool without a shell can work.
Last winter i ended up with the same temps results going with just my wool liners (2 wool layers) that i did adding some old motorcycle leather gloves that didn't breath well above the same wool liners (1 wool layer). I believe i can explain that by the fact that going all the way wool without a shell can limit blood flow restriction and maximize wick ability which lead to dryer skin which is the warmest solution among the multi-layer systems (skin dry - layer dry > skin dry - layer wet > skin wet - layer dry > skin wet - layer wet) as i read in some study. As long as the skin and the layer stay dry and that the blood flow toward the fingers is not restricted it will works with wool. When my wool liners became wet after grabbing some stuff in the snow it wasn't so comfy anymore.
An easy test is to try one system in one hand and another one in the other hand.

Last edited by erig007; 12-04-13 at 06:06 PM.
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Old 12-06-13, 02:58 PM   #34
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I can't stand having cold hands, and gladly chose form over function to keep them warm
at 30 degrees I switch over to these military surplus trigger finger mittens

http://www.surplusnation.com/product...ittens-w-liner

at 20 degees I throw one of these into each of them

http://www.amazon.com/Hand-Warmers-H...YXE/ref=sr_1_9

(cheap copies vailable on eBay)

It's really true that a mitten is essential for warm hands, your fingers will keep each other warm if they can touch. I'm sure several of the other mittens in this thread will work equally well, I like mine because
A) I can slip my index finger into the trigger part when I need to do a bunch of shifting
B) They are big enough to fit a heater into when its really cold
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Old 12-06-13, 03:13 PM   #35
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I've been wearing bike gloves under extra-large mittens, so I can just take them off when it goes from 20/-6 in the morning to 36/2 in the evening. I'm waiting to see what it is like when it is colder.
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Old 12-06-13, 03:21 PM   #36
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I have bought some Hestra "lobster" gloves which comes with a removable wool liner and has some rubber on the palms.

They are really, really nice, and I used them today for the first time (we had hurricane force winds today and hail and snow).

I was very toasty.

Found them - they are called "Wool Terry Lobster":

http://hestragloves.com/en/gloves/ou...terry-lobster/

For a bit warmer weather, I use some "Mountainbike" [edit, I just took a look, those are Hestra's too] gloves, which are just right for cooler, but not cold, weather.

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Old 12-09-13, 03:31 AM   #37
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As an update: I bought some silk glove liners, specifically ones from Cocoon/Travellers' Tree. They were absolutely brilliant (although it was still a bit cold with my current gloves)... and then the second time I wore them I lost one of them. Note to self: Be very careful with very small, light, thin gloves...

So now I'm ordering the Outdoor Research Alti gloves...
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Old 12-10-13, 08:55 AM   #38
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My wife has a pair of the Pearl Izumi Lobster Gloves, and they are astonishingly warm. I've borrowed them a couple times on rides in the low 20F neighborhood and after just a few miles my hands are sweating and I need to take them off (...which obviously presents a few problems of its own). Super-warm cycling glove; if i had to ride in sub-freezing (or subzero) temps alot I would definitely get a pair of my own

...but I would also definitely get a single-speed bike dedicated to winter riding. Becauise I hate trying to operate brifters while wearing lobster claw gloves! So I own an assortment of 5-finger winter gloves, and I'll be honest, I'm disappointed in all of them when it gets down to the low 20s. The Specialized Sub-Zero two-piece system and the Assos Winter three-piece system have come the closest to providing me with a reliable off-the-shelf product, but if I really want warmth, dryness, and dexterity I need to do a lot of crazy a la carte mixing & matching between all the gloves & liners & whatnots that I've amassed.
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Old 12-10-13, 11:15 AM   #39
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http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=18667476

no one's fingers gets colder faster than mine... I bought those gloves, if they can't help me then nothing will..I also bought liner gloves for them
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File Type: jpg pEMS1-14978721venh.jpg (39.5 KB, 10 views)
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Old 12-11-13, 01:47 AM   #40
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Just picked these http://www.evo.com/mittens/burton-ap...lack-front.jpg up at TJ Max today for $19.95 marked "past season"! I went with the extra large to be able to have plenty of room and still fit my merino wool fingerless gloves inside the liners if I need to. I also picked up glove liners for the Burton 2-in-1 glove for $9.99 as the outer shell was missing?

I had been using the 0 deg neoprene gloves from Dicks Sporting Goods but after trying 2 different pairs they were falling apart. I took got them back and got these for cold rainy weather http://www.marinegeneral.com/product...parentid=10906 for $29.95. Great deals today! Temps are supposed to get down to the single digits the rest of the week, so I will be trying them out on my late night commute!
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Old 12-11-13, 09:30 AM   #41
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As confessed from others on this forum, I also have Renaud's syndrome. I wear different gloves for different temperatures but for anything below -4 degrees C I wear battery powered gloves that are good up to -20 before my hands feel the cold. So far a full battery charge is good for my 10 kilometer ride into work and return.
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Old 12-12-13, 08:01 AM   #42
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Update on my previous post on temperature for comfort wearing electric gloves. With the wind chill, and unfortunately a head wind, the temperature for this mornings commute was -21 degrees C. Thumb and forefinger on my right hand was uncomfortably cold. It took about 10 minutes longer because of the slush and snow depth, a hard slog for cyclists today.
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Old 12-12-13, 01:16 PM   #43
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My wife has thyroid issues in that, she does not have one and although being on the right medications keeps those levels normal she still suffers more from having cold hands and feet.

We went and picked up some very nice insulated shell mittens that she can combine with a wool / thinsulate glove and her hands are toasty... we were considering pogies but were not pleased with the commercially available ones we saw and I can make them.

The glove / mitten combo is also useful on and off the bike and we deal with severe enough cold here that most gloves just don't cut it for cycling. With a mitten you can also slip your thumb out and slide it up against your fingers to warm it up.
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Old 12-13-13, 03:08 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluish Green View Post
For the truly bitter cold, I have a pair of mountaineering mittens that are so incredibly warm and waterproof that I cannot imagine even attempting bicycling in weather that would be too cold for them.
When biking in serious cold...-10F...-30F...(and that's my limit) even those gloves may not be sufficient. I have not had the same luck others seem to have had with mittens in extreme cold. I've worn similar mountaineering mittens in cold temps when biking and found them wanting simply because biking involves holding onto handlebars without moving your hands/arms much. When climbing you are virtually always moving your entire body and you may have an ax or gear in your hands but your hands and arms are moving and keeping blood flowing. Not so when biking. Locally (North Pole, Alaska) almost everybody uses what we call pogies...bar mitts by any other name. You can use relatively thinner gloves inside pogies. For my money pogies are the only way to go when it gets cold.
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Old 12-13-13, 12:55 PM   #45
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pogies for the win!!!
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Old 12-13-13, 01:52 PM   #46
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Update:
I brought bad luck to myself just a few days after praising wool gloves.
Yesterday after riding all day long going from A to B to C to D with just my wool gloves without a shell I noticed that my left thumb had turned dark blue and some dryness at my fingertips like after playing guitar. Nothing life threatening at this time but more and i would have probably lost my fingers. The worst part is that i never felt cold with my wool gloves. Just noticed the wind going through the gloves.
From now on i will add a wind resistant leather layer to my wool gloves even if i don't feel cold.

Last edited by erig007; 12-14-13 at 02:12 PM.
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Old 12-14-13, 02:21 PM   #47
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-22C/-7.5F 1hr one way with my snowmobile gloves. Not comfy but ok. I wouldn't ride more than 2hr with these.
Glove system: leather shell - aluminum reflective tape on the glove fingertips - 100g thinsulate liners - always on thin wool liners - lots of room for wiggling.
On my way back they were too warm so i had to switch to my shell mitts.
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Old 01-05-14, 03:24 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drbenjamin View Post
I can't stand having cold hands, and gladly chose form over function to keep them warm
at 30 degrees I switch over to these military surplus trigger finger mittens

http://www.surplusnation.com/product...ittens-w-liner

at 20 degees I throw one of these into each of them
After reading this a few weeks ago I picked up a pair of these from another vendor. Haven't tried them on the bike yet but I used them today plowing snow on an open garden tractor. I used the liners and outer mittens, no hand warmers. Outside for about an hour, temperature about 8 degrees with wind chills of around -15 and blowing snow. Hands stayed nice and warm and I had no problems working the controls.
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Old 01-06-14, 09:35 AM   #49
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I smoked for about a decade and my circulation is still recovering, so my hands and feet are perpetually frigid. I've found that XC ski gloves are good for fit, ie, having fingers that'll fit between the brake lever and bar, as well as insulation/windproofing. More importantly, they're reinforced in most of the same places as dedicated cycling mitts. I've literally torn gloves apart that weren't reinforced along the base knuckles and meat of the thumb just from daily riding. My commutes now don't feature a whole lot of wind, but there are some positively massive downhills and I do some winter mtb'ing as well. So this is what I'm using: 50-35= Pearl Izumi Cyclone gloves; 35-25= Toko light XC gloves; 25-10= Auclair XC ski gloves (which I love, but can't find on their site to link); <10= Marmot 3-Sixty ski gloves. Favorites are definitely the Auclairs. I'll link when I find it.
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Old 01-09-14, 07:09 AM   #50
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At the end of last winter I picked up a pair of these Planet Bike Borealis gloves at the LBS. I really like them, especially for the price. They combine the ring and pinky fingers for warmth, but allow the trigger and middle fingers to work independently which helps with shifting. They come with fleece liners. Eventually, I'd like to get around to replacing the liners with wool, but so far I haven't needed to. They've been fine for me through this cold snap so far (-20F/-29C, with -45F/-43C Windchill), though in these temps I've been sticking to around town riding (3mi/5k). Around 0F/-18C, I can last all day. I'm sure there are alternatives with less bulk, but these work fine.
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