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-   -   Tips for riding in snow? (http://www.bikeforums.net/winter-cycling/926090-tips-riding-snow.html)

wphamilton 12-30-13 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by technoD (Post 16368233)
Does anyone suggest the zip tie trick around your wheels for added traction??
I wimped out on my ride to work, 3.3 miles due to the hard pack snow/ice combo with the knobbys on my 29" hardtail.
I have plenty of panduit zip ties but wanted to hear from someone who's done this??

Thanks!

Everyone that's tried it and reported here has said that it doesn't work. common sense: you wouldn't expect that the flexing plastic would dig into ice. Or stay on without breaking if they did.

We might get deep snow here (I mean four inches) once every five years. I just ride light snow loose and balanced, it works well enough for the few days I have to. Ice ruts under the snow stops me, deeper snow stops me, but just a little is easy without special measures.

technoD 12-30-13 02:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wphamilton (Post 16368303)
Everyone that's tried it and reported here has said that it doesn't work. common sense: you wouldn't expect that the flexing plastic would dig into ice. Or stay on without breaking if they did.

We might get deep snow here (I mean four inches) once every five years. I just ride light snow loose and balanced, it works well enough for the few days I have to. Ice ruts under the snow stops me, deeper snow stops me, but just a little is easy without special measures.

Ok ,just wondered. I saw some pics awhile back where the latched ends of the zips were placed so that they alternated at about 10 deg either side between the sidewall and center of the tire to help with cornering.
The hardpack/ice we've had so far this year here in N. Ill. sucks bad. :(
Studded 29" tires are a tad pricey but another option I guess...
Thanks for your input.

SnowJob 12-30-13 04:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by soze (Post 16349725)
See, this is my argument as to why *I* need a Moonlander, but husband says "nooooo, we can't fit it with the rest of the bikes/Bob trailer/etc." :(

My wife bought a Pug Ops earlier this year and rides it almost every day. Some days she does like 30 to 40 miles, riding around to the kids she tutors. She's a ****ing badass.

xuwol7 12-30-13 04:45 PM

Invest in some good studded tires, as there may be some ice under the snow (cheaper than a visit to the ER).
Balance is the key heavy pedals, light hands and keep your center of gravity over the bottom bracket.
It is not a race, don't make any sudden moves, slow and steady and it is a great workout.

A lot of great advice on this forum, a background in Mountain Bike Riding may help.

Check out this book:
http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&key...sl_36v3e384p_b

SnowJob 12-30-13 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cyccommute (Post 16368276)
Sorry but this is wrong. Riding snow is like riding sand. A front wheel that digs down will become hard to control and keep moving forward because you lose momentum and the bike holds the line too much because the wheel is trapped. The front tire should float as much as possible.

Nah, depends on what kind of snow it is. Sometimes you do want your front tire to dig in, for example if you're coming down a hill, or you've just come over a pile of snow/slush (such as what plows leave behind near intersections), and your weight is low and to the rear of the bike, and you need to make a turn.You do want your front tire to be a bit weighted so it can dig through the snow to, hopefully, find some grip. Even more so if you run a studded front tire. Best thing to do is shift your weight up, tap the brake to shift weight forward than carefully turn, without leaning the bike too much.

xuwol7 12-30-13 05:46 PM

I agree, there is no hard and fast rules as you have to adjust to the weather, conditions, etc.
Here in North Dakota it can be sometimes crazy out there and you have to adapt to the ever changing conditions.
The weather may change within the hour so always be mindful and aware.
One word I can say is "balance".

Be one with your you and your bike and the weather and prepare for the worst
People think I am crazy to ride at 100+ (summer)and 40- (winter) all year long, but it is all good.

HTFU rule #5 .....http://www.velominati.com/the-rules/

scoatw 01-01-14 08:24 AM

One thing is for sure. Your bike handling skills will greatly improve. I can ride in about 4 to 5 inches of snow without squirreling out. Anything above that and it gets iffy. That's when riding down a tire track comes in. It gets easier the more you do it. You slip down to a lower gear and find a good pedaling cadence, and try to make good time. I'm usually doing this at 4am on my way to work.
Anytime they call for an 1" or more of snow, I'm putting the studs on. One less thing to worry about, is slipping and falling. You put studs on and you can pretty much ride in anything out there and you get to extend your riding season.

social suicide 01-01-14 08:11 PM

Step one: Get some snow. http://vimeo.com/clearcoldcinema

niuoka 01-02-14 09:07 PM

so far this year have only had 4 days of snow on the road, but next year I might invest in some stud tires and hope for snow so I can add it to my ridding experience
I know, im a strange old guy


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