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-   -   Running on dry pavement hard on carbide studs? (http://www.bikeforums.net/winter-cycling/929514-running-dry-pavement-hard-carbide-studs.html)

Myosmith 01-11-14 09:55 PM

Running on dry pavement hard on carbide studs?
 
Just as I got my Marathon Winters on my bike, the temps went from -25F to +30F and the roads have gone from thick ice to clear except for the occasional sheltered spot. Since there are still some slick spots and a few snow patches, does it hurt the carbide studs to run them on dry asphalt 90% of the time just to have some insurance for those few slippery spots or in case the conditions change? Kind of a PITA to change tires due to a warm spell mid-winter but I want to get a lot of riding in while the conditions are good.

prooftheory 01-12-14 09:38 AM

The best solution is to have an extra set of wheels.
edit: scratch that. The best solution is n+1.

TuckamoreDew 01-12-14 09:39 AM

Nope, that shouldn't be a problem; carbide is tough stuff. They'll wear down a little bit more quickly than if you were riding mostly on ice/snow but it shouldn't be a big deal. Those are pretty much the conditions that I use I use my Marathon Winter tires in. I ride with them in late fall and early spring when there's lots of asphalt and only occasional ice.

chriskmurray 01-12-14 10:12 AM

I would not worry about it, with the Marathon Winters, you can bump up the air pressure up to keep the studs from contacting the road as much when in a straight line.

The carbide will outlast the rubber in your tires so stud wear with carbide should not be any type of problem. I would make sure you are not cornering or braking as aggressively on dry pavement though as you can pull out studs easier.

scoatw 01-12-14 10:44 AM

I've had my Nokian Extreme 294's going on winter #7 and the studs are still looking and performing good. I used to worry about the studs wearing down on the pavement. But now I don't even think about it. These tires are hardy and I don't see why I shouldn't get a good 10 or 15 years out of them. If I did, that would be great.
But I also have them mounted to a second wheel set. So I only use them when they're needed. It takes me less than 10 minutes to switch wheels. Lots of times you'll encounter dry roads after they plow and clear the snow. And having the ability to switch tires saves wear and tear on the studs. Not to mention the relief of going back to the road tires.

Barrettscv 01-12-14 12:07 PM

Just be careful not to corner or brake hard, except for an emergency. Tearing out studs is the biggest issue when using studded tires on pavement.

Spld cyclist 01-12-14 01:45 PM

+1 on N+1. I have an old mountain bike that has studs all winter and ready at a moment's notice.

soze 01-12-14 03:11 PM

Peter White says you're fine, as long as you're not completely tear-assing around.

I've run my Hakka's on similar ground for several seasons. It's the same as running studs on a car; you have them for those odd moments of black ice.

Myosmith 01-12-14 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chriskmurray (Post 16404005)
I would not worry about it, with the Marathon Winters, you can bump up the air pressure up to keep the studs from contacting the road as much when in a straight line.

The carbide will outlast the rubber in your tires so stud wear with carbide should not be any type of problem. I would make sure you are not cornering or braking as aggressively on dry pavement though as you can pull out studs easier.

Quote:

Originally Posted by prooftheory (Post 16403926)
The best solution is to have an extra set of wheels.
edit: scratch that. The best solution is n+1.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Barrettscv (Post 16404240)
Just be careful not to corner or brake hard, except for an emergency. Tearing out studs is the biggest issue when using studded tires on pavement.

Thanks for the advice everyone. Actually the winter bike was this year's N+1. The bike is an older Trek Multitrack which I use as my Plan B bike. It's heavy, has full fenders and a rear rack, so there isn't a lot of tearing around corners or hard braking. Most of my activity in the winter is tooling around town, or when the weather permits, some long, straight base miles on rural paved roads. Not much for hills or sharp turns anywhere in the immediate area. I was running the pressure at about 40 psi (range 35-50) but bumped it up to 50 today which did reduce the stud buzz on the road but still handled any slick spots admirably. I'm really liking these tires.

alan s 01-12-14 08:14 PM

I run Marathon Winters 26x1.75 at 65 psi for mostly clear roads, and drop them to 40 psi when more traction is needed. At 65, the outer rows of studs do not contact the ground, reducing rolling resistance.

chriskmurray 01-12-14 09:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Myosmith (Post 16405261)
Thanks for the advice everyone. Actually the winter bike was this year's N+1. The bike is an older Trek Multitrack which I use as my Plan B bike. It's heavy, has full fenders and a rear rack, so there isn't a lot of tearing around corners or hard braking. Most of my activity in the winter is tooling around town, or when the weather permits, some long, straight base miles on rural paved roads. Not much for hills or sharp turns anywhere in the immediate area. I was running the pressure at about 40 psi (range 35-50) but bumped it up to 50 today which did reduce the stud buzz on the road but still handled any slick spots admirably. I'm really liking these tires.

Sounds like you will have no problems then. I still want to get me a set of Marathon Winters, I have a set of Nokian studded MTB tires that work great but are REALLY aggressive and kill my motivation to use them unless it is really nasty out.

fietsbob 01-13-14 01:39 PM

No .. My Nokian tires are 25 years old and still grip adequately ... (not a bat out of hell rider, on ice)

a cars' studded tires get worse wear and tear .. and it's the Highway that wears down.


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