Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Upgrade old CCM bike or get another bike

    Hi, I was looking to use an old (20yr) steel CCM mountain bike for commuting in the winter. It gets very cold (-20 -30) , snowy and slushy here. I am starting with shorter distances (3KM one way). Not much climbing, but if I'd want to venture a little farther out, there is a larger hill that stands in the way of several destinations.

    The shifters on the bike are very stiff (very hard to move), changing gears and in gear is very noisy, not smooth at all. The bike also feels very slow. It's been giving me quite a workout thus far which is good as it keeps me warm . Looking long term though Id like a bike which will give me a better ride and durability. Given the age of the bike, I'm not sure how much longer the components will last anyways.

    Should I upgrade the components on the bike or would it be better value to get an inexpensive and durable used mountain bike? If it would be better to get another bike all together, I can get a GT Timberline 2.0 for about 250 CAD tax in come spring, or would a used bike get me better value for my needs, hopefully for less money as well?

    Thanks for taking the time to answer this noob question.

  2. #2
    Senior Member chriskmurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    My Bikes
    Borealis Echo, Ground Up Designs Ti Cross bike, Xtracycle, GT mod trials bike, pixie race machine
    Posts
    927
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It comes down to what is your budget and what are your expectations of the bike?

    If you just want something practical some basic maintenance could go a long way in fixing some of your complaints. Cables/housing should fix the shifter issue and are very cheap to replace, for the being slow, it could be something as simple as not enough air in your tires, brakes rubbing or even bearings needing serviced but you should be able to make a 20 year old bike still work really well.

    If you simply want an excuse to upgrade, I say go for it if the budget allows. If we are more excited about our bikes we tend to ride them even more which is always a good investment.

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the reply Chris, I will take the bike down to the shop and see what they say about alleviating my concerns with the bike keeping your recommendations in mind. At what price point , if any, is it no longer "worth it" to fix/upgrade the bike? For example what if I need a new cassette, chain, derailleur (not sure if that would even cause my shifting and noise issues, or drastically improve my ride quality, i.e. faster , smoother) etc... Just want to make sure before I start putting money into the bike as it may be more costly to change directions later on as I probably wont recoup most of the money I put into the existing bike.

  4. #4
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Middle of da Mitten
    My Bikes
    Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, homebuilt recumbent
    Posts
    7,337
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A 20-year old CCM would be "newer" than the ones I have experience with. In the mid-to-late 70s, the steel CCMs were bad enough to make dept store bikes look good, not only because of the cheap frames that would spontaneously sprout rust from every angle, but for extremely cheap parts, too. If yours is anything like those, then upgrading anything on it would be wasted effort.

  5. #5
    Senior Member chriskmurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    My Bikes
    Borealis Echo, Ground Up Designs Ti Cross bike, Xtracycle, GT mod trials bike, pixie race machine
    Posts
    927
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would simply ask your shop what it would cost to make everything work as it should and go from there. It is always hard to put a price on how high is too much. Your personal budget, sentimental value the bike may have, how well the bike currently fits you, your cycling goals, etc all will dictate if it is "worth it" or not.

    If your goal is simply to have an efficient commuter that is cost effective and the bike fits you well, fixing it up is probably your best option. The nice thing about 20 year old bikes is parts are usually pretty cheap, the labor can get pricey if there is a lot needed but still well less than a new bike. The other option is to buy any parts needed and fix it yourself or with the help of a co-op. This time of year bike shops are usually slow so you may even be able to talk them into teaching you a bit as they fix your bike or ask if they offer classes on repair. If asking for anything out of the ordinary, a good quality 6 pack goes a very long way in a bike shop!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •