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Old 08-31-12, 06:32 AM
  #7  
Hydrated
Reeks of aged cotton duck
 
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Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Middle Georgia, USA
Posts: 1,176

Bikes: 2008 Kogswell PR mkII, 1976 Raleigh Professional, 1996 Serotta Atlanta, 1984 Trek 520, 1979 Raleigh Comp GS, 1995 Trek 950, 1979 Raleigh DL-1 Tourist

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Originally Posted by Abe Froman View Post
Are you a bigger fellow or hauling stuff? Might consider going to a wheel with more spokes. Your wheel could also be all around under tensioned as well. Shop replaces the broken spoke and trues the wheel but doesn't fix (or makes worse) the problem that causes the spokes to break in the first place.
+1

I see this quite often.

Start with wheel that was not built up to the highest standards to begin with. Not built badly enough that you can call it a poor build... but not built the way that I'd build it. Then you pop a spoke. The LBS shoves a spoke in to replace the broken one and tweaks the nipple enough to get the wheel true... but they never fix the condition that caused the broken spoke.

When I build a "normal" wheel... 32 or 36 spokes laced 3 cross... I expect them to never pop a spoke under reasonable use. If they break one spoke, I fix it and go on riding the wheel. If they pop another spoke then it usually means one of two things:

1) Something is wrong with the build.
or
2) You are using the wheel under conditions for which it was not intended.

Another problem is that #2 is often confused for #1... I once had a guy insist that his wheels were defective, when the real problem was that he weighed north of 300 pounds and wanted to ride a 16 pound carpet fiber bike with a 16 spoke wheel set.
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