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Old 04-04-16, 07:03 PM
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79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
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Location: Portland, OR
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Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Get some rollers and ride on them for a few weeks.
My favorite response! But, OP, don't take it too seriously. Riding rollers at this stage might well turn you off from cycling completely.

Rollers are "trainers" that consist of three cylinders about 18" long and 6" in diameter in a low rectangular frame. Two cylinders run across the frame at one end and one at the other. The bicycle rear wheel fits on top of the two. A belt drives the one at the other end. You ride the bike just like you are on the road but this road is only 18" wide and has no visual guides to assist balance. Very demanding balance-wise. And if you can get comfortable on them, riding a precise straight line on the road doing anything at all is child's play. (There are racers who can sit up and pull their jerseys over their heads riding them but I'll wager they have hundreds of hours on them.)

Rollers have been around for 100 years. Racers still use them. Races are held on them.

I forgot to point out that any time you deviate from that 18" "road", you crash. Zero speed so the road rash is negligible. But plan your furniture around your rollers accordingly.

The friends who kept an eye on me after my head injury set me up on rollers and would not let me get back on the road until I had proven to them I had mastered the rollers. True friends.

Ben
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