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The 41 refugee thread

Old 01-09-18, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by TMonk
I moved into a new place in August and I have no water hose access. How do you guys clean you bikes who don't have access to a hose? I've been keeping the drivetrains clean but the frames are kinda gross.
I just spray Pledge on it and wipe with a rag. I never use a hose unless it's a muddy mtb.
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Old 01-10-18, 04:55 AM
  #1777  
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If there's no caked-on dried mud, something like Pledge works well, or you can get a can of stronger but similar stuff in motorcycle shops - one of our customers runs the local Honda shop and brought us a case of it. Just spray it on and wipe it off. If there's chain grunge on the chainstay, use the solvent you've been using on the drive train, dampen a paper towel with it and clean the chainstay off, followed by the Pledge.

If you've been muddin' ...get a drop cloth from the paint section of a hardware store, spread it out on a section of uncarpeted floor, spread a bunch of rags/paper towels underneath the bike, and carefully do the bucket/soap/water thing. Or take it to a DIY car wash and use the sprayer there to blast off the mud and bring the bike home to finish it off.
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Old 01-10-18, 05:26 AM
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Be careful with pledge around the tires. I'm not sure but I would assume it would make them very slippery (pledge makes everything slippery).
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Old 01-10-18, 07:08 AM
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Haven't had to do it myself, but I've heard of people taking their bike into the shower.
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Old 01-10-18, 07:19 AM
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Originally Posted by himespau
Haven't had to do it myself, but I've heard of people taking their bike into the shower.
I was going to say bath tub.
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Old 01-10-18, 07:21 AM
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Mine has never been dirty enough to use a hose, so I just use some kind of spray cleaner...lately i've been using White Lightning Matte Finish cleaner. Works great and I havent had to actually buy any since the guys at the LBS let me use their stuff from time to time
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Old 01-10-18, 08:40 AM
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Good suggestions. Thanks!
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Old 01-10-18, 09:13 AM
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baby wipes, I've managed to do a lot of cleaning with them
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Old 01-10-18, 10:44 AM
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just damp microfiber cloth with maybe a little dish soap. I have hose access, but there's no reason to inject water into every crevice like that.
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Old 01-10-18, 08:50 PM
  #1785  
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Originally Posted by TMonk
I moved into a new place in August and I have no water hose access. How do you guys clean you bikes who don't have access to a hose? I've been keeping the drivetrains clean but the frames are kinda gross.
Bucket full of warm, soapy water with a brush or sponge. Works well then you just pour plain water out of the bucket to get off the soap. Pull the chain off if you can before doing this.
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Old 01-10-18, 11:41 PM
  #1786  
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Ah! A bucket works .

I like using soapy water and those big hydrophilic auto sponges because they cover a lot of surface and you can just squeeze them into any nook and cranny and the sponges just cover everything.

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Old 01-14-18, 05:11 PM
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I never used a power washer until this week at a cx race. Those things are fun. Think DIY car wash pressure X 3? Maybe they just had the good pumps. Hard part was keeping the bike from being sprayed away. I was truly worried about peeling the tread off the tire, and paint off the frame, so was careful with my angles. I avoided the hubs and BB, but that thing cleans a chain by getting everything off.
See video: https://www.homedepot.com/tool-truck...DEC/index.html

Last edited by Doge; 01-14-18 at 05:15 PM.
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Old 01-14-18, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Doge
I never used a power washer until this week at a cx race. Those things are fun. Think DIY car wash pressure X 3? Maybe they just had the good pumps. Hard part was keeping the bike from being sprayed away. I was truly worried about peeling the tread off the tire, and paint off the frame, so was careful with my angles. I avoided the hubs and BB, but that thing cleans a chain by getting everything off.
See video: https://www.homedepot.com/tool-truck...DEC/index.html
https://www.******.com/r/powerwashingporn/

censors the website for some reason.. It's red(dit)
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Old 03-09-18, 12:01 PM
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I'm trying latex tubes on my race bike and have suffered my second blowout in 6 or 7 rides. The tubes are Michelin AirComps spec'd for 22-23c tires, but riding a 25 mm tire on a 24 mm width rim. I'm thinking they're just too narrow and fold up in there.

Anything else I could be missing? All together the tire+tube combo (Corsa G+ and latex) is notably fast and soft and I'm enjoying the ride. Maybe I just need to try the Vittoria 25/28c tubes instead?

Also I'm using a Topeak valve extender, don't think it matter but thought I'd mentioned.

Thanks,
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Old 03-09-18, 12:16 PM
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Latex is very elastic and you'll get pinch flat much easier than with butyl. I first check to make sure the tube is sitting in the tire properly, pump it up to 80 or so, inspect, then deflate and repump.
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Old 03-09-18, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by TMonk

Anything else I could be missing?
Check the rim strips, they have to cover the spoke holes perfectly.
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Old 03-09-18, 03:35 PM
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latex tubes also age incredibly poorly, so if they are old or sat on a shelf for a long time they might just be dead.

When I tried to break into my stash of latex tubes to put in my TT disc I went through like 4 of those ****ers before I found one that held. Nothing wrong with the tire or wheel.
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Old 03-09-18, 03:41 PM
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I've never had any luck with latex.
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Old 03-09-18, 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted by furiousferret
Latex is very elastic and you'll get pinch flat much easier than with butyl. I first check to make sure the tube is sitting in the tire properly, pump it up to 80 or so, inspect, then deflate and repump.
This is the opposite of my experience: I get fewer flats with latex vs butyl.

Also, it is good advice about installation. Many people that I know who report trouble with latex have problems that stem from installation. I like the pink latex tubes because it is very easy to see when the tube is caught between sidewall and rim.

For an initial installation I like to inflate to 20, 30psi, then use my thumb to push on the sidewall, first on one side, then the other. I check to make sure the tube is not pinched. I then inflate to higher psi (70, 80) and deflate if I'm truly being careful.

After that you should be good to go until the tube is removed.

People who are used to butyl are often SHOCKED at just how easy it is to pinch that sidewall during installation, even when being somewhat careful. It's particularly common if someone is using any kind of tool/lever to assist with getting the tire on.
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Old 03-09-18, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by caloso
I've never had any luck with latex.
Keep trying!

It's a meaningful amount of watts saved, and the nice part is that the # is constant, which means that a lower-power rider benefits MORE (in %age terms) than a higher-power rider, all else equal.
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Old 03-09-18, 05:57 PM
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Originally Posted by tetonrider
This is the opposite of my experience: I get fewer flats with latex vs butyl.

Also, it is good advice about installation. Many people that I know who report trouble with latex have problems that stem from installation. I like the pink latex tubes because it is very easy to see when the tube is caught between sidewall and rim.

For an initial installation I like to inflate to 20, 30psi, then use my thumb to push on the sidewall, first on one side, then the other. I check to make sure the tube is not pinched. I then inflate to higher psi (70, 80) and deflate if I'm truly being careful.

After that you should be good to go until the tube is removed.

People who are used to butyl are often SHOCKED at just how easy it is to pinch that sidewall during installation, even when being somewhat careful. It's particularly common if someone is using any kind of tool/lever to assist with getting the tire on.
That's my issue. I tried using latex tubes on my race wheels (Williams 58) and tires (Vittioria Corsa G+), which are pretty tight as it is. I think part of the problem was that these were brand new tires when I installed them, so they hadn't been inflated and rounded out.
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Old 03-09-18, 07:08 PM
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I got to change some tires for the cadets last weekend. It is pretty amazing the different tire fit between models and brands. I took a Gatorskin off and put on a Michelin. That was tough. Great tire. A cadet showed me his trick of pinching the whole beads from both sides to the center where there is more room to make things a bit easier.
I never really knew that/did that having my life spent with tubulars and tires that I can get on the rim with my hands, although quite obvious why it works better.

But latex tubes only for me.
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Old 03-09-18, 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by caloso
That's my issue. I tried using latex tubes on my race wheels (Williams 58) and tires (Vittioria Corsa G+), which are pretty tight as it is. I think part of the problem was that these were brand new tires when I installed them, so they hadn't been inflated and rounded out.
that certainly makes it tougher.

100% it was just an installation issue. anyone who has been successful has had a problem with latex tubes before figuring out the necessary modifications to our technique. some people move on before figuring it out, though.

it's worth it.*

* - except maybe when you are traveling an only have access to a mini-pump... then it is super annoying to have to try to get the tire back up to the right pressure before every ride, when a butyl tube needs just a couple pumps.
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Old 03-09-18, 10:49 PM
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[MENTION=99188]tetonrider[/MENTION] - I agree on the latex tubes - for racer junior, for old guy me.
But recently having experiences with near 10 different tire combos - those matter easily as much. Those going to latex tubes should also be going to supple tires.
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Old 03-09-18, 11:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Doge
[MENTION=99188]tetonrider[/MENTION] - I agree on the latex tubes - for racer junior, for old guy me.
But recently having experiences with near 10 different tire combos - those matter easily as much. Those going to latex tubes should also be going to supple tires.
well, yeah--tons of people are riding (or racing on!) bad tires that don't really afford more protection but are measurably slower.

latex tubes, though, will improve any setup, regardless of one's chosen tire.
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