Go Back  Bike Forums > The Racer's Forum > "The 33"-Road Bike Racing
Reload this Page >

Why do so many racers really live in Spain?

Notices
"The 33"-Road Bike Racing We set this forum up for our members to discuss their experiences in either pro or amateur racing, whether they are the big races, or even the small backyard races. Don't forget to update all the members with your own race results.

Why do so many racers really live in Spain?

Old 12-10-04, 07:46 PM
  #1  
Figaro
Fortunatissimo
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Baja Canada
Posts: 215
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Why do so many racers really live in Spain?

Well, Jesus Manzano might be telling us why in his statement to the Spanish press quoted in cyclingnews.com yesterday: "I'm disappointed at the world of cycling. The truth is: I don't know if my accusations have served anything. Spain is a third world country in terms of justice. For the Spanish federation I've gone from being a witness to being the accused. It's shameful. I envy France or Italy where doping is fought with courage." In case you've forgotten, Manzano did a "tell all" against his former team, Kelme, last year. He talked about how he was almost killed by a bad transfusion.

I am very much in favor of all the progressive things that have been happening in Spain. I also believe that recreational drugs are a personal matter. However, from what I've read and seen in Spanish movies, there is a heck of a lot of drug use and easy availability there. It seems that the Spanish authorities are soft on the distribution and use of both recreational drugs and performance enhancing ones.

I have often wondered why a number of American cyclists, including Armstrong, Hamilton, Leipheimer, and VandeVelde, chose to live just over the border from France rather than in France itself. In LA Confidential, the author, Walsh, says that his main informant told him that she went to Spain to get the drugs for the Postal Service team.

And why not live in Italy? The weather there is very good and there are great places for training. Why did Postal avoid any involvement with the Giro? Maybe what Manzano said, gives a clue.

The official story on the foreign cyclist community in Gerona is that at first one American cyclist lived there, I think it was Armstrong, then a number of others followed suit. But maybe there is another story about why cyclists choose to live there, when much of their work is further north in Europe.
Figaro is offline  
Old 12-10-04, 08:19 PM
  #2  
JBBOOKS
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Maybe they like the rice.
JBBOOKS is offline  
Old 12-11-04, 03:28 PM
  #3  
poululla
Great guy
 
poululla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Denmark
Posts: 397
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tax is lower for starters. Spain is also Europe's number one holiday destination. Given the choice I would move there as well.
poululla is offline  
Old 12-11-04, 03:39 PM
  #4  
cyclezealot
Senior Member
 
cyclezealot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Fallbrook,Calif./Palau del Vidre, France
Posts: 13,195

Bikes: Klein QP, Fuji touring, Surly Cross Check, BCH City bike

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1261 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I have been to Spain in the summer..It is hotter than hell...Winters nice though...Don't most training camps go to Spain in January..Thought roads better for cyclists in other parts of Europe....
Anyone recall 3-4 years ago Spain passed some really regressive laws regarding the rights of cyclists...Was it not after some pro got killed on a Spainish highway...Laws seemed pretty restrictive/anti - cyclist as I recall....Anyone confirm that.please..
cyclezealot is offline  
Old 12-11-04, 03:50 PM
  #5  
SamDaBikinMan
Crank Crushing Redneck
 
SamDaBikinMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: A van down by the river.
Posts: 2,600

Bikes: Bikes are environmentally damaging

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Because the French will kick in their door once a week to test them and search for drugs.
SamDaBikinMan is offline  
Old 12-12-04, 09:16 PM
  #6  
Figaro
Fortunatissimo
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Baja Canada
Posts: 215
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SamDaBikinMan
Because the French will kick in their door once a week to test them and search for drugs.
Wow, I wish I could be as succinct as you. But that's the answer I was looking for.
Figaro is offline  
Old 12-12-04, 10:16 PM
  #7  
extomesm
Senior Member
 
extomesm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 135
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
its an amazing place
extomesm is offline  
Old 12-13-04, 06:21 AM
  #8  
roadwarrior
Senior Member
 
roadwarrior's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Someplace trying to figure it out
Posts: 10,651

Bikes: Cannondale EVO, CAAD9, Giant cross bike.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Figaro
Well, Jesus Manzano might be telling us why in his statement to the Spanish press quoted in cyclingnews.com yesterday: "I'm disappointed at the world of cycling. The truth is: I don't know if my accusations have served anything. Spain is a third world country in terms of justice. For the Spanish federation I've gone from being a witness to being the accused. It's shameful. I envy France or Italy where doping is fought with courage." In case you've forgotten, Manzano did a "tell all" against his former team, Kelme, last year. He talked about how he was almost killed by a bad transfusion.

I am very much in favor of all the progressive things that have been happening in Spain. I also believe that recreational drugs are a personal matter. However, from what I've read and seen in Spanish movies, there is a heck of a lot of drug use and easy availability there. It seems that the Spanish authorities are soft on the distribution and use of both recreational drugs and performance enhancing ones.

I have often wondered why a number of American cyclists, including Armstrong, Hamilton, Leipheimer, and VandeVelde, chose to live just over the border from France rather than in France itself. In LA Confidential, the author, Walsh, says that his main informant told him that she went to Spain to get the drugs for the Postal Service team.

And why not live in Italy? The weather there is very good and there are great places for training. Why did Postal avoid any involvement with the Giro? Maybe what Manzano said, gives a clue.

The official story on the foreign cyclist community in Gerona is that at first one American cyclist lived there, I think it was Armstrong, then a number of others followed suit. But maybe there is another story about why cyclists choose to live there, when much of their work is further north in Europe.
There is a ton of variety in terrain near and around Gerona. They are friendly to Americans and cyclists in particular. The weather is outstanding.
roadwarrior is offline  
Old 12-13-04, 06:49 AM
  #9  
Grasschopper
He drop me
 
Grasschopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Central PA
Posts: 11,646

Bikes: '03 Marin Mill Valley, '02 Eddy Merckx Corsa 0.1, '12 Giant Defy Advance, '13 Salsa Vaya

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Figaro
Wow, I wish I could be as succinct as you. But that's the answer I was looking for.
Yea but the problem is the French will do that even if they aren't doping and it would be a huge distraction to the training.
__________________
The views expressed by this poster do not reflect the views of BikeForums.net.
Grasschopper is offline  
Old 12-13-04, 07:09 AM
  #10  
Jaco
Italo-racer
 
Jaco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 300

Bikes: 03 Bianchi Veloce, 04 Surly Steamroller

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yeah, but when it comes to cycling, in the end you have to pick Italy.
Jaco is offline  
Old 12-13-04, 03:53 PM
  #11  
c.j.monty
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Feutersoey, a small village in the Alps
Posts: 40

Bikes: GIOS compact '89, TREK 8600, Cinelli Aliante

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Gotta admit that I like Italy for my spring training the best. Here in Switzerland where I live, there isn't any Spring. It kind of stays a mushy sort of winter until June and if we are lucky, it turns into summer. I think though that the scenery here in Switzerland has them all beat. Spain is probably the driest of the European countries during that season, but the two times I went there for Spring training, I wasn't very impressed with the landscape and as a purely hobby type bicyclist, landscape plays an important part of my bicycling. I have also heard that Spain is pretty lax about doping controls, though don't take my word for it.

Monty
c.j.monty is offline  
Old 12-13-04, 03:57 PM
  #12  
squeegy200
Senior Member
 
squeegy200's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,377

Bikes: Colnago Altain, Klein Pulse II, Stumpjumper FSR, GT Zaskar LE, Pedalforce RS2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Last Month's Cycle Sport is dedicated to Spanish riders. In addition to the articles on the legendary cyclists from that country and the exclusive interview with Miguel Indurain, there is an article by Jonathan Vauters that describes why so many professional cyclists have chosen to live in Spain.

From a cyclist perspective, it very different from the picture you just painted.
squeegy200 is offline  
Old 12-16-04, 05:01 PM
  #13  
B10Cycle
Permanent Amateur Mark
 
B10Cycle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 349

Bikes: Specialized Allez, Nishiki MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Because it's an incredible country. I went there this past summer and that's when I got interested in cycling. The South is hotter than hell in the Summer, but where I was in the North, Santander specifically, the weather was much cooler and very nice.

The people were very American and cyclist friendly. So far as I could tell Spain's recreational drug policy was quite lax.
B10Cycle is offline  
Old 12-16-04, 05:12 PM
  #14  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 38,320

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1955 Post(s)
Liked 353 Times in 196 Posts
Are you kidding? Have you been to Spain? It's beautiful! I'd move there in a minute.
caloso is offline  
Old 12-20-04, 10:27 PM
  #15  
Bontrager
Senior Member
 
Bontrager's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 2,339

Bikes: Road, MTB, Folding, Commuting bikes...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The women
Bontrager is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.