Old 08-12-07, 05:13 AM
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Podolak
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Originally Posted by mgbiker View Post
I have 2 bikes and I am just getting back into riding. I will be riding mostly off road trails, intermediate level at most. I am 5'9 and 195 lbs.

The 1st bike is a Mongoose Rockadile - 100% Cromo Frame and Fork.
- STX Front and Rear Derailer
- STX Hubs
- STX brakes
- STX brake leavers and gear changers
- Mongoose neck
- Shimano Crank: just says FC-MC30


2nd bike is a GT Avalanche 2.0 - Heat Treated Formed Alum
- Fork is Rock Shox Judy TT
- Formula Hubs
- Rims X2000 made by Alex
- Tektro brakes
- Shimano V brake handles, shifter says CI Desk Plus
- Acera Front Derailer
- Alivio Rear Derailer
- Crank has an "S" with a crown over it and MX3L
- Neck says "handcrafted bicycles since 1972 southern california"


I don't know much about the components on each bike, how would you recommend I assemble the two of them to take advantage of the "best" parts?
I like steel so I'd stick with the steel frame. Although older I think you are probably better off with the STX stuff on that steel frame. If you prefer the aluminum and the front suspension move the STX stuff over. This is of course if you are just looking for a project. Otherwise I'd suggest riding it as it is. Even if others tell you it isn't worth it to move the parts around I still think it is. From a pure learning perspective that is. Become proficient working on your old bikes and when you buy a new one you will have a lot of knowledge and comfort level going into it. Feel free to post here for help if you run into a snag with your project. If you do stick with the steel frame and STX stuff, tear it down anyhow and grease/lub everything up. That will still give you the experience it seems you are looking for.
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