Old 11-28-07, 08:48 AM
  #13  
Marylandnewbie
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I found over the past couple of winters that I can actually fine tune body temp by baring my wrists and or neck to cool off a little when shedding a full layer is not called for. The other thing to add or remove is your hat.

The body prioritizes areas to keep warm. Your head and torso with the brain and vital organs are high priority so the colder they are the more blood flow will be restricted to the extremities in order to save the heat for your core. The warmer you keep your core the more blood will flow out to your extremities as the body tries to regulate its temp. This is most evident with hands, but also holds true for feet. Covering your ankles well is probably not going to have as noticeable an effect on cold feet as covering your wrists. Your blood vessels simply don't run that close to the surface in your ankles -- hence why we don't check pulses or draw blood from ankles.

I have found that to keep my toes warm I really need to minimize the effects of wind as I ride. When it gets really cold I switch to some lightly insulated hiking boots which completely block the wind. If I throw in a pair of chemical toe warmers, my toes can be downright toasty.

So keep experimenting until you hit the right combinations. Its a good idea to keep track of temps and windchills at which you were comfortable and uncomfortable so that over time you will get a very good sense of what to where at what temps.
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