Old 04-03-08, 04:06 PM
  #12  
Bottomfeeder
Mr. cost-benefit analysis
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Agua Dulce, CA
Posts: 437

Bikes: Surly Crosscheck Single Speed, Novara 9 speed commuter/runabout

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I read the spec's. It sounds like a pretty good frame and decent, mid-level components. Here's what I'd consider to lighten the load and make it run better on the street... better than some road bikes, depending on how rough the roads you'll be riding on are.

http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...%20ATB%20Forks

http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...to%2026x1%2E75

http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...pless%20Pedals

OK. I'm spending a bunch of your money on pedals. But that's what you get by asking us to live vicariously on your dime. I myself, true to my screen name, make due with $20 nashbar MTB clippless pedals on my cyclocross commuter bike. Any clippless pedal, even inexpensive ones will help you down the road and up the hills.

Now if I had a MTB I wanted to ride on the road I'd seriously consider the carbon fork. It will fit your 1 1/8" headset. I've been riding a 700 sized Winwood carbon cyclocross version on my steel framed road bike (sure looks like the same maker to me) for about 4 years now and I'm happy with it. It's held up fine and believe me when I say, I don't baby it.

They make 1" slicks in 26", but I think they're too harsh. Stick with 1.25"-1.5" and get a light tread pattern. But do pay attention to the weight of the tire. Depending on your rim width, your choices might be more limited for wide rimes.

You should strip the tires off your wheels and weigh them in order to be able to tell if you could save enough weight in order to justify investing in new hoops. That will take a little research on your part. Having a shop build wheels is expensive. You can save some money mail-ordering wheels, but you'll need to do your homework and know exactly what your ordering. And still, you might need a shop, or a home mechanic, who can check the tension and true for you.

Hope this helps. Good luck. DanO

PS: Do a little soul searhing now. If you think for a minute you want drop handlebars, stop the madness and buy a proper road bike.

Last edited by Bottomfeeder; 04-03-08 at 04:18 PM.
Bottomfeeder is offline