Old 08-08-08, 07:20 AM
  #11  
HandsomeRyan
Pants are for suckaz
 
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Mt. Airy, MD
Posts: 2,578

Bikes: Hardtail MTB, Fixed gear, and Commuter bike

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Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
This hitch works but......Boy! it sure is fugly!!
Haute couture is not a part of utility cycling.

Originally Posted by Cynikal View Post
Why not just drill a hole through the center of the caster and attach it to the skewer? That may be claener and just as strong. Or use your disk brake mounts. Just talking out loud...I think it's a great design.
I think your ideas could work in some situations but i'll address why I did not use them on this design-

The "arms" of my hitch distribute the load of the trailer over a large area of the seat and chain stays; a skewer mount would put a lot of load on skinny little piece of steel that wasn't designed for those types of forces. I see a lot of homebrew trailer hitches that use the factory skewer but personally I think thats not a safe design. They sell a specailly made trailer hitch skewer mechanism but I've never used one so I don't know anyhting about it.

Disc mounts would be great to use if the bike didn't actually have disc brakes. It's not worth messing up a pair of $100+ hydraulic disc brakes because every time I put the hitch on or take it off I have to unbolt the whole caliper assembly.

You can't drill a hole in the center of the castor because the way it's made. Drilling out the center would cause the 'swivel' to detach from the 'base plate'. It's easy to see when you are holding a castor wheel in your hand but hard to explain in words, if you look at the first picture at the top of the page you can kind of see what I mean.


Originally Posted by surfimp View Post
Can't tell from the pictures, so maybe you've got one already - but it wouldn't be a bad idea to use an "uh oh" strap
The strap is on the trailer side of the hitch mechanism. It loops through the bike's frame and connects back to the trailer's arm.
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