View Single Post
Old 09-07-08, 12:23 PM
  #12  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9,232
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 153 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by stokell View Post
I guess the bottom line is to do a few shakedowns before the big trip and only take the stuff you actually use.
Maybe, but I think there is still reason to send stuff home on a long tour even if you planned perfectly.

A lot of what gets sent home is because of poor planning, but not all.

If your trip is long enough to take you from one climate or season to another you may find it worth having different stuff sent to you from home and or sending stuff home.

You may acquire things along the way, like souvenirs etc. Also maybe you just ran into some great deal on gear that you liked but didn't need on this trip. One 106F day in Dillon Montana we escaped the heat by spending the afternoon in the Patagonia outlet store. We all had stuff sent home. In that case the store handled the shipping and there was no charge for touring cyclists to have stuff shipped home.

If you are using expensive maps or guide books you probably don't want to carry the whole set on a multi month tour, but also don't want to throw them away. I am inclined to take all of the maps with me so I can look ahead, but send the ones I am done with home.

Some trips you may want to travel lighter than others. Your mood for this may change as a trip progresses. Those who are inclined to motel it sometimes may decide they don't want to camp any more at some point on a trip (I am too cheap for that).

Also if not riding solo... needs may change depending on group dynamics or group decisions.

Bottom line... There are lots of reasons you may want to send stuff home and not all of them are the result of poor planning.
staehpj1 is offline