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Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs Have a need for adaptive equipment to ride to compensate for a disability or loss of limb or function? This area is for discussion among those of us in the cycling world that are coming back from traumatic circumstances and tell the world, "No, you are not going to beat me down!"

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Old 01-10-17, 12:16 PM   #26
fietsbob 
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OK, can you sit in a chair? you can ride a Recumbent bike or trike..
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Old 01-10-17, 08:32 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Reviewing all the available data and deciding that PSA testing is not something you want to do is not "burying their head in the sand." It's actively managing one's personal risk vs. reward tradeoff and making your own decisions rather than relying on doctors and a health-care system that may have a completely different agenda than yours.

- Mark
What is the difference between PSA and free PSA? - Harvard Prostate Knowledge - Harvard Health Publications

PSA is simply another tool that can be used, or not, in the decision making of one's future direction of treatment, or not. Being a fairly non-invasive or expensive test, why one would not take advantage of the test?
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Old 01-10-17, 10:05 PM   #28
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PSA is simply another tool that can be used, or not, in the decision making of one's future direction of treatment, or not. Being a fairly non-invasive or expensive test, why one would not take advantage of the test?
Certainly there is no great harm in taking the test, lousy as it is. But if you take the test, then this presumes you would go the next step and act upon the results if they show an elevated score. And the next steps ARE invasive, expensive, and have significant side effects. If you are not prepared to do the next steps, then there is no point in taking the test. The PSA test is Pandora's box and you better have a good plan to deal with what you find inside. If you're not willing to do this, just skip it.

Here is what the inventor of the PSA test has to say:
Ablin has been frustrated by the widespread use of the test. Each year, he notes, some 30 million men undergo PSA testing, at a cost of $30 Billion. Yet “the test is hardly more effective than a coin toss. As I’ve been trying to make clear for many years now, P.S.A. testing can’t detect prostate cancer and, more important, it can’t distinguish between the two types of prostate cancer — the one that will kill you and the one that won’t. “
There is certainly nothing wrong with taking the test, but you should think through what you're trying to accomplish and what you would do if it shows an elevated score. And to bring this back to the OP, deciding to give up bicycling to lower your PSA score is just plain silly stupid. It's like giving up exercising because it raises your blood pressure during exercising and will all know that high BP is bad, just like a high score on a PSA test.

- Mark

Last edited by markjenn; 01-10-17 at 10:15 PM.
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Old 01-11-17, 03:07 AM   #29
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Certainly there is no great harm in taking the test, lousy as it is. But if you take the test, then this presumes you would go the next step and act upon the results if they show an elevated score. And the next steps ARE invasive, expensive, and have significant side effects. If you are not prepared to do the next steps, then there is no point in taking the test. The PSA test is Pandora's box and you better have a good plan to deal with what you find inside. If you're not willing to do this, just skip it.

Here is what the inventor of the PSA test has to say:
Ablin has been frustrated by the widespread use of the test. Each year, he notes, some 30 million men undergo PSA testing, at a cost of $30 Billion. Yet ďthe test is hardly more effective than a coin toss. As Iíve been trying to make clear for many years now, P.S.A. testing canít detect prostate cancer and, more important, it canít distinguish between the two types of prostate cancer ó the one that will kill you and the one that wonít. ď
There is certainly nothing wrong with taking the test, but you should think through what you're trying to accomplish and what you would do if it shows an elevated score. And to bring this back to the OP, deciding to give up bicycling to lower your PSA score is just plain silly stupid. It's like giving up exercising because it raises your blood pressure during exercising and will all know that high BP is bad, just like a high score on a PSA test.

- Mark
Just curious as to what you might suggest be done as a course of action regarding prostate health monitoring as one gets older.

As far as giving up cycling.....that was addressed early on, and by myself, as to a simple refrain from cycling for 5 to 7 days and retest.

As far as prostate issues, I do not know your personal history but mine has included everything from irritation issues to GleasonScore10 prostate cancer. Been there and still am there for the rest of what ever life I have left. My journey has only begun and quite frankly, a blood test is not all that invasive and I just had my monthly PSA test on Monday as per my doctor's orders.
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Old 01-11-17, 05:03 PM   #30
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Just curious as to what you might suggest be done as a course of action regarding prostate health monitoring as one gets older.
Same as we did before the PSA test - monitor for other symptoms, urinary difficulties, DRE, etc. And monitor the research..... this is an active area and there should be more data coming on the effectiveness of the current PSA testing options and on more reliable tests coming. But for the record, with the data available today, I personally am not doing PSA testing.

On the subject of "getting older" keep in mind that even current pro-PSA testing guidelines generally do not recommend testing past 75 or so.

- Mark

Last edited by markjenn; 01-11-17 at 05:09 PM.
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Old 01-12-17, 07:00 AM   #31
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The new PCA3 is much more accurate, but for most men it's very expensive.
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Old 01-12-17, 08:38 AM   #32
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Saddles: I ride touring-ish road bikes with saddle and the top of the drop bars roughly level. After a prostate cancer diagnosis and prostatectomy a few years ago I went from using any handy inexpensive saddle (over the years, that includes a few long tours and a dozen or so double centuries usually on padded plastic-based saddles) to split saddles; Koobis on three bikes, one Terry Fly, and one WTB Laser. I tried a couple of Sella An Atomicas and was not happy at all with the stretch factor--wonder what species of road kill their leather comes from!? About noseless saddles; they might not be very good unless you are accustomed to a triathlete-like position. Just looking at one of those ISM units makes my forearms ache.

Last edited by Feldman; 01-12-17 at 02:11 PM. Reason: Wanted to add information
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Old 01-13-17, 11:27 AM   #33
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VERY INFORMATIVE.......well worth watching......

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPwM...ature=youtu.be
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