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Asymmetrical handlebars

Old 01-27-23, 08:23 PM
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Asymmetrical handlebars

A bicycle wreck 6 months ago shattered my left elbow. Mistakes were made. My left is crooked and shorter than my right. I can reach the drop barsí hoods, but I canít hold the position for very long.

Can anyone recommend a different handlebar configuration other than drop bars or some other modification that I havenít yet thought about? Iím picturing something asymmetrical. Thanks in advance.
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Old 01-30-23, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Klausw
A bicycle wreck 6 months ago shattered my left elbow. Mistakes were made. My left is crooked and shorter than my right. I can reach the drop barsí hoods, but I canít hold the position for very long.

Can anyone recommend a different handlebar configuration other than drop bars or some other modification that I havenít yet thought about? Iím picturing something asymmetrical. Thanks in advance.
I'd look for some tri-bars (or just the one) that allowed me to stack the arm rest extra high: the closer to your elbow the arm rest is located, the less leverage on the bad joint. Rest the bad arm while maintaining normal position with the good arm, and retain original controls, possibly with an auxiliary brake lever for the bad side.
You might just get used to your arm, given time. I have a shortened twisted leg that was weak and weird when I started riding again.
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Old 01-30-23, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by grumpus
I'd look for some tri-bars (or just the one) that allowed me to stack the arm rest extra high: the closer to your elbow the arm rest is located, the less leverage on the bad joint. Rest the bad arm while maintaining normal position with the good arm, and retain original controls, possibly with an auxiliary brake lever for the bad side.
You might just get used to your arm, given time. I have a shortened twisted leg that was weak and weird when I started riding again.
Thanks! Iíll give that a try.
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Old 01-30-23, 08:45 PM
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Can you find two different handlebars that would work on the same stem? Like a drop bar for your good side with a deep reach and a much shallower bar that would work for your rebuilt arm? If you could, I bet each be cut in half and a sleeve of steel tubing inserted. Then drill and tap each side for screws to prevent twist.

Caution - this is an idea I just had. Needs engineering.
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Old 01-31-23, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney
Can you find two different handlebars that would work on the same stem? Like a drop bar for your good side with a deep reach and a much shallower bar that would work for your rebuilt arm? If you could, I bet each be cut in half and a sleeve of steel tubing inserted. Then drill and tap each side for screws to prevent twist.
Caution - this is an idea I just had. Needs engineering.
No need to cut and shut - the late great Sheldon Brown had a multi-bar setup. You could do similar with two a'head stems on a long steerer.
If I were to combine two bars into one (or one and a half) I'd be using clamps to hold them together rather than sleeves and screws - like those handlebar extenders you can get but meatier.
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Old 03-22-23, 03:15 PM
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interesting idea! Thanks

Iím trying riser drop bars on an adjustable stem now.

Originally Posted by 79pmooney
Can you find two different handlebars that would work on the same stem? Like a drop bar for your good side with a deep reach and a much shallower bar that would work for your rebuilt arm? If you could, I bet each be cut in half and a sleeve of steel tubing inserted. Then drill and tap each side for screws to prevent twist.

Caution - this is an idea I just had. Needs engineering.
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